Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week: Sparky


first_imgFacebook16Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-PetMeet Sparky!  He is a happy, 57 pound, 7-year-old, who loves exercise!  He has a blast in our agility yard, and really enjoys playing fetch! You can be sure that he will always greet his people with joyous enthusiasm. He loves car rides, knows how to sit on command, really likes water, walks great on a leash, and as a bonus can wave his paw in the air! He has a beautiful white coat, bold black markings with a touch of brown. Sparky is very loving, smart, and has an optimistic personality. My forever family will need to be active, have a securely fenced yard, and provide me with a grain-free diet.Sparky is an adorable pup looking for an active family to call his own. Photo courtesy: Adopt-A-PetAdopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit the Adopt-A-Pet website, our Facebook page or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email thedoghouse3091@hotmail.com or call 360-432-3091.last_img read more

Thurston County Public Health Talks Teens and Opiods


first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Gabrielle Byrne for Public Health and Social ServicesOpioids have two faces: they can reduce pain and they can trigger the body to release pleasure-related chemicals in the brain (dopamine is one you may have heard about). This can lead from use to misuse, and possibly to an addiction to opioid drugs.Teenagers are getting addicted not just to street drugs, but also to prescription pain killers. Opioids now represent a clear and present danger to kids everywhere. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, teen deaths due to opioid overdose rose by 19% in a single year. This includes deaths due to street drugs like heroin and fentanyl, as well as to prescription medications (like oxycodone). According to the National Institute of Health, some teens may use multiple drugs or combine drug use with alcohol.Okay, you say, but this is a huge national problem. What can we do here? How can we help our own kids, and friends in our community?Be aware. Opioids are commonly prescribed to teens for things like dental surgery (e.g.; wisdom teeth), or sports injuries.  Parents should ask their child’s doctor about alternatives to prescription pain medications, as well as non-drug pain relief methods (massage, physical therapy, acupuncture, etc.). If prescription pain medication is needed, ask for the lowest possible dose, and be sure an adult distributes and stores the medications. Monitor your child for signs of abuse, dependency, or over-medication.Stay connected. Playing an active, listening role for teens, to help them process what’s going on in their lives is important. Approaching touchy topics without judgment, as best you can, and sharing information shows you care.In fact, there have been a number of scholarly articles, and even Ted Talks, about the relationship between addiction and connection. The recent statement that seems to get the most play in the news is that “The opposite of addiction is not sobriety—it’s connection.”Beyond the blanket suggestion to “connect,” there are lots of concrete things that can help:Educate yourself and your teen about common substances and what they do.Talk to your teen and make sure they understand what they might, at some point, be offered, and the risks of that substance. Safe partying options are also an important discussion topic. Listen to their concerns. Offer to help them come up with creative ways to say no. Don’t put it off.Have the “Teen Link” number available on the fridge or other common space. If your teen needs to talk, and doesn’t want to talk to you, these are anonymous and confidential services. The Teen Link number is 866-833-6546 and it’s available in the evening from 6:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. The 24-hour Crisis line is also an option: 866-427-4747.Give medication as directed. If your teen’s prescription is not controlling their pain, talk to their doctor.Don’t leave opioids out where they can be seen. Store them in a locked drawer, cabinet, or tool/tackle/lock box. Hide the key in a different location.Always dispose of medications properly. Use free Medicine Take Back service locations to drop off meds you no longer need. Locations are listed at takebackyourmeds.orgAddiction, when it happens, can be scary and overwhelming. There are associated health risks—sexually transmitted diseases, blood borne infections spread through sharing needles, and worries about overdose. Talking to your teen may also become more difficult. It can be hard to know where to start. Support services for families who have a loved one struggling with opioid addiction are available. If you, or someone in your household has an opioid addiction, it is legal for you to have Naloxone, a product that may help reverse an opioid-related overdose, on hand. This drug will not help with other non-opioid drugs like methamphetamine. There are many places where Naloxone is available. In addition, there are local crisis and treatment resources.There are no easy answers when it comes to preventing addiction, nor is there an easy way forward when it happens, but there is a broad community of support—ready, willing, and able to step up and do the work at your side.last_img read more

O’Conner, Boatright Record Braces in Opener Loss


first_imgFacebook6Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Oly Town ArtesiansTJ O’Connor and Nate Boatright each scored twice in the Oly Town Artesians’ 9-6 loss to Tacoma Narrows FC in front of one of the biggest crowds in Artesians history on Saturday night at The Pavilion. Alex Vogt scored a hat trick to lead Narrows to their first victory as a member of the Western Indoor Soccer League.Tacoma struck first when AJ Nitzel found some space and pushed one past Artesians goalkeeper Ryan Perkins just a minute and a half into the game. David Cook answered for Oly just a minute and a half after that, tying the game 1-1 with 11:00 left in the first quarter. Jay Weinman scored the first of his two goals with 1:16 left in the first and Tacoma held a 2-1 lead after the first 15 minutes.Paul Park put Narrows up 3-1 with nine minutes left in the second quarter, but the Artesians rallied for the next two goals, including Nate Boatright’s first at the 7:16 mark and TJ O’Connor’s first with 5:51 left in the quarter to tie it up 3-3. Tacoma answered moments later with a goal by Travis Homestead and another with just 56 seconds left in the half by Alex Vogt to take a 5-3 lead into the break.A defensive third quarter led to just one goal, Boatright’s second, and Tacoma took a 5-4 lead heading into the fourth quarter. Vogt gave them a two goal lead before O’Connor got the Artesians back to within one. But Vogt and Weinman scored the next two goals to give Narrows an 8-5 lead. Christian Segovia scored a power play goal with 1:34 left to make it 8-6 before JC Henson capitalized on a pressing Artesians defense and added the goal that iced the game to give Narrows their first ever WISL win,Perkins and Tacoma keeper Nate Salveson both played fantastic games, making numerous saves and keeping the game competitive for both teams.The Artesians will look for their first win the weekend after Thanksgiving when they play host to the Snohomish Skyhawks on Saturday, December 1st. Kick off at The Pavilion is set for 6:30 p.m. Stay up to date with the Artesians by visiting the Oly Town Artesians website, following them on Twitter, and liking them on Facebook.last_img read more

The Hands on Children’s Museum Celebrates National Children’s Dental Health Month…


first_imgFacebook39Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Hands On Children’s MuseumThe Hands On Children’s Museum will feature National Children’s Dental Health Month and promote the importance of good oral health throughout the month of February. Children can get free dental screenings, explore an interactive dental office exhibit, and enjoy special guests and activities all month.The Hands On Children’s Museum is partnering with the Willamette Dental Group as the presenting sponsor for Dental Health Month.“Helping the Hands On Children’s Museum in educating families about the importance of oral health at an early age is a good way to get involved and build goodwill,” explains Kim Ziebell, Vice President of Marketing and Brand Strategy, Willamette Dental Group. “We believe that when we support the communities that we serve, better oral health is a result.”Special guests and activities are featured all month and are free with admission. Kids can meet and get their photo taken with costumed superheroes–Amazon of Olympia and Batman in Seattle on February 8 from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. In the MakeSpace, visitors can build toothbrush ‘bots, February 7-9, make a silkscreen smile print, February 14-17, and sew a monster mouth or tooth fairy pillow, February 21-23. Kids can explore the history of powerful pachyderms and see replicas of elephant, mammoth, and mastodon teeth February 14-16. For a full schedule of screenings and activities, visit the Hands On Children’s Museum website.Free dental screenings are another highlight of this month-long celebration giving many children who have never visited a dentist the chance to visit a dentist and learn about dental wellness. Screenings are completely free thanks to Screening Sponsor Small to Tall Pediatric Dentistry and over a dozen local dentists who donate their time. Screenings will take place from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. each Saturday in February and during First Friday Night, February 7, from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Families who bring their children in for screenings receive free admission to the entire Museum. This is the 19th year that Hands On has offered free dental screenings to its visitors.The Museum’s Dental Health Month kicks-off with the opening of the interactive Puget Sound Dental Office exhibit on Feb 1, sponsored by Dr. Bo M. Davidson of Hawks Prairie Pediatric Dentistry. The Museum transforms an exhibit space into a Dental Office complete with a dental chair, lab coats, x-rays, and examination tools, where more than 70,000 visitors can explore the dental office and young visitors can become the dentist for the day.last_img read more

Kiren Rijiju announces zonal committees to scout talent in the country for FIFA WC…


first_imgAdvertisement 1d0qNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsaq9blWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ecn1v( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 2lfzcWould you ever consider trying this?😱omCan your students do this? 🌚qqRoller skating! Powered by Firework Minister for sports and youth affairs Kiren Rijiju outlined an elaborate plan to scout talent across the nation in a bid to achieve FIFA World Cup qualification. The strategy involves five zonal committees and aims for the nation to qualify for the World Cup and the Olympics in the next 10-15 years. Advertisement The minister claimed that this approach aims to make India a sporting powerhouse. The programme would be funded by  Sports Authority of India under the Khelo India Programme in partnership with the All India Football Federation. Rijiju added that this would be the ‘most aggressive exercise’ implemented by the ministry.Advertisement He revealed to Suni Chhetri through a virtual programme organised by Football Delhi that the committee will be formed in the next few months. He stated:“We will form five talent scouting committees in the next few months, one for each zone — north, south, east, west and northeast — under Khelo India Programme of SAI in partnership with AIFF,”Advertisement “We cannot go with the usual approach, we have to go deeper in a professional way. It will be the most aggressive exercise we had ever done. We have to find out talented children below 12 years from every nook and corner of the country whether it is northeast, the tribal areas of central India, coastal areas, south or north,” he added.Rijiju aspires for World Cup and Olympic qualificationApart from scouting talent, the programme also aims to give financial assistance to state governments and the federation as well in order to conduct local leagues to nurture talent and giving them a platform to showcase their ability. This will also enable scouting at a grass-root level.AIFF president Praful Patel expressed his delight over the ministry’s decision. He said:“A more aggressive and comprehensive programme right to the last village of the country with SAI’s financial support is welcome. I am very happy to hear this from the minister,”Moreover, Sunil Chhetri who turned 36, was part of the virtual programme and gave his inputs to the ambitious and optimistic approach by the ministry. He stated:“Talent identification and right coaching is the most crucial thing. If we can identify all the talented children of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 years of age and give them right coaching, we will go miles and the change will be monumental,” he said.“We have not tapped the entire talent pool in this country. Since we have not searched the whole of the country, the idea that India is yet to arrive is wrong.”If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.com Also, follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.comALSO READ:Players required to sign SOP guidelines prepared by BCCI before resuming training Advertisementlast_img read more

Swimming to Fight Cancer


first_imgSwimmers stay in their lanes in the Chapel Beach Club pool during the swim marathon to benefit the American Cancer Society. Monday, July 23rd 2012Back row, from left, Gerri Kellett, Lisa Halikias, who is a cancer survivor, Marianne Vel Camp and event co-coordinator Emily VelCamp; front row, from left, American Cancer Society Director of Special Events Jen Hernandez, event co-coodinator Adele Kellett, Andrea LeLand, MiaRose LeLand, Chapel Beach Club owner Sandy Mulheren and swim teach coach Kyle DeLisa.Chapel Swim Team members from Chapel Beach Club in Sea Bright held a morning swim marathon on Monday, July 23, to raise funds for the American Cancer Society. Swimmers, ages 6 to 16, took part in the event that raised funds through pledges each lap the participants completed. Dozens of youngsters participated in a swim marathon to benefit the American Cancer Society.last_img read more

State’s ‘Free Fishing Days’ Slated for June 15-16


first_imgBy John BurtonTRENTON — Fresh water anglers next weekend will be able to take advantage of two days of free fishing.The Christie administration announced it will again hold the state’s annual Free Fishing Days on June 15-16.Fishermen can participate in their sport for those two days without needing to purchase a license or trout stamp, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).The free fishing days are held each year to coincide with National Fishing and Boating Week and to encourage the activity by residents and visitors, according to the DEP.While licenses aren’t needed for those two days, other regulations, including size and catch limits, will continue to be enforced.last_img read more

COVID-19 Update: Isolation Guidelines, Indoor Reopenings


first_imgAdditionally, New Jersey continues to ramp up its contact tracing program to control the spread of the virus as much as possible. During Wednesday’s press conference, Perry N. Halkitis, Ph.D., the dean of the Rutgers University School of Public Health, said that 1,000 new tracers are currently being trained by the school. “We have to continuewith our social distancing,folks. We have to wear theface coverings. There areno excuses to let up evenone bit. We are far fromdefeating COVID-19,” saidMurphy. “We are in a goodplace to contain it… but it isnot yet defeated.” Halkitis called the state’s contact tracing model “innovative” because it combines efforts of the governor’s office, health departments at the state, county and local levels and the “scholarly expertise” of the Rutgers School of Public Health. Anyone interested in becoming a contact tracer may apply by visiting jobs.rutgers.edu/postings/115779. “Wearing a face coveringis proven to help protectothers around you. It is aproven measure for furtherslowing the spread,” saidMurphy. We should all bein the practice of wearing aface covering by now.” In discussions with the governors of New York and Connecticut, Murphy said any visitors from highly-impacted states should self-quarantine upon arrival in New Jersey, New York or Connecticut. That includes states with current daily positive percentages over 10 percent as a seven-day average, or states with over 10 cases per 100,000 as a seven-day average. FILE PHOTO / JAY COOK Libraries, museums, aquariums and boardwalk arcades are among the next indoor businesses to reopen at 25 percent capacity July 2. He cautioned residents to be extra vigilant when indoors. These businesses will be required to provide heightened sanitation and other social distancing measures. More detailed standards will be released later this week, Murphy said. And like outdoor facilities, face coverings will be required unless customers are dining, or for religious or personal health and safety purposes. “Ours was the most impacted region in the nation and among the most impacted in the entire world. We welcome everyone to New Jersey; we simply ask you to join us in our shared sacrifice to keep ourselves moving in the right direction,” said Murphy. By Allison Perrine The article originally appeared in the June 25 – July 1, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Looking to the next line of businesses to reopen, the governor said that as of July 2, indoor facilities including museums, aquariums, libraries and indoor recreation spaces like bowling alleys and boardwalk arcades, can reopen at 25 percent capacity. “We would love to be able to open those things up; we just are not there yet,” said Murphy. “We just don’t think it’s the responsible thing to do.” NEW JERSEY – There’s been a slight uptick in daily positive rates of COVID-19 cases in New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy reported Wednesday. But businesses will continue to reopen during the second phase of the road to recovery. In a press conference Wednesday, Murphy announced that the statewide total of positive cases reached 169,892, with 12,993 total deaths and a daily positivity rate of 2.83 percent. At the same time, several indoor businesses will be permitted to reopen at 25 percent capacity as of July 2, with strict social distancing guidelines in place. Other businesses including movie theaters, performing arts centers and night clubs must remain closed for now. Fitness centers and gyms are also ordered to remain closed in the traditional fashion, but may open for individualized training and by appointment only. Indoor facilities present a greater chance of catching the virus than outdoors, he said. The students are completing an 18-hour online training course with basic COVID-19 contact tracing lessons, Rutgers training modules and data collection training with the CommCare system. They will be deployed to health departments across the state. Later in the week, July 6, NJ Transit Rail and Light Rail services will return to the regular full weekday schedule. The July 6 start date will allow NJ Transit to implement and communicate the new proper social distancing protocols to commuters before ridership increases as businesses and offices reopen. More information about different transit protocols are available at NJTransit.com/recovery.last_img read more

The Hills are alive with the sound of garlic


first_imgBy Timothy Schafer, The Nelson DailyYou don’t have to travel 1,900 kilometres and cross the Garlic Wall in eastern Saskatchewan to get your fill of garlic this weekend.In less than 90 minutes of slope-style driving up the Slocan Valley you can be in New Denver, amidst thousands of garlic lovers and admirers, reveling in the heady aroma of the herb at the 18th annual Hills Garlic Festival on Sunday (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) in Centennial Park. Although it has grown too large for the tiny community of Hills north of New Denver to host, the festival has stayed true to its roots — and its name — with an array of homemade and homegrown organic products, many made from garlic, from 160 vendors across the West Kootenay and beyond.With organic garlic (of course), garlic wreaths and other garlic snacks, the festival also features fresh organic produce, plants and plant products, local crafts — art, jewelry, wood, flutes, furniture, pottery, textiles, rocks — soaps, lotions, herbal remedies and an assortment of food vendors and live entertainment.Last year over 6,000 people poured into New Denver to pay homage to the herbage at the festival, watching as awards for largest head of garlic (soft-neck and stiff-neck), heaviest clove, best garlic poem and best garlic braid were handed out.Admission is $4 for adults with children under 12 allowed in for free. The event is a fundraiser for the Hills Recreation Society and has helped fund recreational facilities and services such as basketball, tennis courts and cross country ski trails.A reminder to festival goers: there is no cash machine on site and most vendors cannot accept credit cards.editor@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

Kimberley, 100 Mile House advance to KIJHL Championship


first_imgJason Richter fired a power play marker past Hawks netminder Tallon Kramer in the third period to snap a 1-1 tie and power the Nitros to the victory.Franco Colapaolo, added an insurance marker for Kimberley while Tyler Van Steinburg scored to give the host club a 1-0 first period lead.Allan Pruss scored the lone goal for the Hawks, ousted for the second time in as many years by the Dynamiters.Kimberley outshot the Hawks 35-30.In Okanagan/Shuswap Conference Finals 100 Mile House defeated Summerland Steam 3-1 to clinch the best-of-seven series 4-1.The KIJHL champ represents the league at the Cyclone Taylor Cup April 7-10 in Victoria. The Kimberley Dynamiters are four wins away from defending the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League title after disposing the Beaver Valley Nitehawks in five games in the Kootenay Conference Playoff Series.The Nitros booked a ticket to the KIJHL Final after edging the Hawks 3-1 in Kootenay Conference Playoff action Monday night in Kimberley.Kimberley won the best-of-seven series 4-1 and now meets 100 Mile House Wranglers in the KIJHL Final beginning Friday in the Bavarian City.last_img read more