Free information


first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaBook stores and Web sites are filled with the latest manuals geared for both advanced and novice gardeners. But if buying the newest how-to book doesn’t fit your budget, turn to University of Georgia experts for free information online.Some 600 publications availableThe UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Web site (www.caes.uga.edu/publications) offers more than 200 research-based publications on gardening and landscaping. Another 400 publications cover subject areas ranging from how to raise horses, cattle, pigs and chickens to how to control carpenter ants and termites. To a home gardener, there’s nothing like nurturing a tomato plant and watching it produce ripe, red tomatoes. But seeing the fruit begin to rot on the vines can cause even a seasoned gardener to panic. For answers, home gardeners can turn to the CAES publications on blossom-end rot to learn how to combat this problem. View instantly or download for laterThe easiest way to find the information on the site is to do a Google search for your topic, said Amanda Swennes, the CAES publications editor who manages the collection. The Web-based publications can either be viewed online or downloaded as a PDF file. “We average about 2.5 million hits a month and 11 percent of those are from addresses outside the U.S.,” she said. The most requested publications in May were Rats and Mice – Keep Them Out of Your House and Yard, Fast-growing Shade Trees, Centipede Lawns, Camellia Culture for Home Gardeners, Dogwood Diseases and Problems, Home Garden Apples and Home Garden Strawberries. The newest or most recently updated CAES publications include Blossom-End Rot and Calcium Nutrition of Pepper and Tomato, Home Garden Blueberries, Home Garden Strawberries, Flowering Annuals and Perennials for Georgia Gardens and Growing Indoor Plants with Success.Most popular publications change with seasonsEach month Swennes keeps a record of the most popular publications. To make sure the publications remain current, Swennes asks UGA faculty to update their publications every one to three years. “This summer, we will release part two of the Native Plants for Georgia publication, which focuses on ferns,” she said. “The first one focuses on trees, shrubs and woody vines.” “Crape Myrtle Culture is usually one of our most requested publications,” she said. last_img read more

Beer: Be Grateful


first_imgCharlottesville craft beer powerhouse Starr Hill is about to release a brand new summer seasonal, Grateful Pale Ale, and we got a chance to knock out a six pack before the beer hits the shelves.Personally, I’m a sucker for anything that’s reminiscent of the heyday of Jam Bands (girls in flowy skirts, selling grilled cheese from the back of a van so you can buy beer for girls in flowy skirts…), so Grateful Pale started with a big check in the “Pro” category.The beer pours more like a pilsner than a pale, with a light straw, almost transparent color in the glass. You get a huge citrusy (grapefruit) aroma and flavor upfront followed by the typical bitterness associated with hop-heavy beers. But Grateful comes across lighter than most pale ales on the market, thanks in large part to its crisp, lean body and low alcohol content (4.7 percent abv).Now, I hate it when beer reviews stop after that first two or three initial sips. In my mind, you don’t know a beer until you hang out with it, drink several at one sitting, and then live with the consequences the next day. And this is where Grateful Pale outshines its competitors. I’m happy to say that this beer gets better and better as you move through the six pack and doesn’t leave a trace of regret the following morning, unlike many of the local pales you find out there today. I’m looking at you Wicked Weed Brewing! Bottom line: This is a session beer for American pale ale lovers, or a great intro into the hoppiness of pales and IPA’s for craft beer beginners. If you’re looking to transition a friend from the land of Blue Moon into the beautiful world of local beer, this could be your ticket.I’d say it’s my favorite beer from Starr Hill, although to be certain, I’d have to try every single beer they produce side by side…which I’m willing to do in the name of science.We got our Grateful Pale in a six-pack of bottles. If you live between Pennsylvania and South Carolina, you can do the same starting May 1, when Starr Hill releases this summer brew to the public. And here’s something else to look forward to in May—BRO is producing a feature about summer seasonal releases from local breweries, and the best outdoor bars in the South. So May is shaping up to be the best month of the year.Follow Graham Averill’s adventures in drinking and Dad-hood at daddy-drinks.comlast_img read more

Paraguay’s Joint Task Force on Alert Against the EPP


first_imgThe EPP has continued to commit kidnappings for ransom. Paraguay’s Joint Task Force (FTC), a team consisting of Military and police personnel, is in a state of high alert in its fight against the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP), a terrorist group responsible for kidnappings for ransom and killings. “The knowledge we have gained about their behavior, their management methods, their food supply, the type of equipment, and other data provides a lot of material for analysts to design more effective strategies to locate them,” Urdapilleta said. The Military and police are continuing to work hard to secure the release of Police Master Sergeant Edelio Morínigo, who was kidnapped by the EPP on July 5, 2014. The EPP has not demanded a ransom, but instead proposed a trade, offering to free Morínigo in exchange for the release of 46 EPP members who had been sentenced to prison. In addition to battling the EPP, the FTC is also confronting an offshoot of the terrorist group, an organization which calls itself the Armed Peasant Association (ACA). This group, which arose in 2014, operates in the northern region of the country. The FTC is confronting a terrorist group that is comprised of family-based gangs, such as the Bernal Maíz, Larrea and Villalba organized crime groups, according to Urdapilleta. The FTC has compiled intelligence about the ACA that will help it fight the terrorist group. “The knowledge we have gained about their behavior, their management methods, their food supply, the type of equipment, and other data provides a lot of material for analysts to design more effective strategies to locate them,” Urdapilleta said. On January 6, FTC Troops and police were on patrol in the district of Horqueta, in the Department of Concepción, when they tried to capture ACA leader Albino Ramón Jara Larrea. He resisted arrest, and the FTC killed him, as well as another ACA leader, Rosalba Moraez. The two ACA members were carrying cash in local currency worth the equivalent of about $12,000. Kidnappings for ransom Paraguay’s Joint Task Force (FTC), a team consisting of Military and police personnel, is in a state of high alert in its fight against the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP), a terrorist group responsible for kidnappings for ransom and killings. “The fight is constant and the work does not cease. There are things we do not make public due to the security of the operations,” said Lieutenant Colonel Víctor Urdapilleta, an FTC spokesman. “This does not mean we are not working on it.” The FTC is confronting a terrorist group that is comprised of family-based gangs, such as the Bernal Maíz, Larrea and Villalba organized crime groups, according to Urdapilleta. In addition to battling the EPP, the FTC is also confronting an offshoot of the terrorist group, an organization which calls itself the Armed Peasant Association (ACA). This group, which arose in 2014, operates in the northern region of the country. By 2008, the outlaw group had changed its name to the Ejército del Pueblo Paraguayo, or Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP). The EPP has continued to commit kidnappings for ransom. “We cannot take credit for the release of Arlan Fick, but we can say that, thanks to actions that we undertook and other extreme actions we refrained from taking, he was released,” according to Urdapilleta. Security forces have also made great advances in fighting the EPP, according to Colonel Jorge Mieres, director of the Army’s Social Communications Division (DICOSO). In recent years, the Prosecutor’s Office has obtained convictions against 46 individuals who confessed to being members of the EPP. By Dialogo January 29, 2015 The terrorist group continued to use kidnapping for ransom. In September 2004, the outlaw group kidnapped Cecilia Cubas, daughter of former Paraguayan President Raúl Cubas Grau and current Senator Mirta Gusinky. Law enforcement authorities eventually found Cubas’ body in a grave outside Asunción, despite the payment of a $350,000 ransom. The kidnappers justified the killing by claiming that the payment was not a ransom, but a “fine against Cubas’ parents.” By 2008, the outlaw group had changed its name to the Ejército del Pueblo Paraguayo, or Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP). Paraguayan security forces have been battling the EPP since 2001, when the organization was the armed wing of the Marxist and anti-imperialist political party Patria Libre (Free Homeland). The first of six kidnappings committed by the illegal group took place against María Edith Bordón de Debenardi, the wife of a prominent businessman in November 2001 for whom they demanded a ransom of $1 million for her release. The ransom was paid, and the terrorist group released her after two months in captivity. “The fight is constant and the work does not cease. There are things we do not make public due to the security of the operations,” said Lieutenant Colonel Víctor Urdapilleta, an FTC spokesman. “This does not mean we are not working on it.” On January 6, FTC Troops and police were on patrol in the district of Horqueta, in the Department of Concepción, when they tried to capture ACA leader Albino Ramón Jara Larrea. He resisted arrest, and the FTC killed him, as well as another ACA leader, Rosalba Moraez. The two ACA members were carrying cash in local currency worth the equivalent of about $12,000. Paraguayan security forces have been battling the EPP since 2001, when the organization was the armed wing of the Marxist and anti-imperialist political party Patria Libre (Free Homeland). The first of six kidnappings committed by the illegal group took place against María Edith Bordón de Debenardi, the wife of a prominent businessman in November 2001 for whom they demanded a ransom of $1 million for her release. The ransom was paid, and the terrorist group released her after two months in captivity. “We cannot take credit for the release of Arlan Fick, but we can say that, thanks to actions that we undertook and other extreme actions we refrained from taking, he was released,” according to Urdapilleta. The FTC confronts the ACA The FTC has compiled intelligence about the ACA that will help it fight the terrorist group. That year, the EPP kidnapped rancher Luis Lindstron, who remained in captivity from June 21 until September 12, when his family paid a ransom. But in 2013, Lindstron was killed, allegedly by the EPP. Law enforcement authorities suspected the EPP killed Lindstron because he was not willing to pay a “toll” to the terrorist group. The government rejected the idea. “The government will not negotiate with terrorists,” Minister of Interior Francisco De Vargas said on December 25 in a telephone conversation with Telefuturo (Channel 4). The terrorist group continued to use kidnapping for ransom. In September 2004, the outlaw group kidnapped Cecilia Cubas, daughter of former Paraguayan President Raúl Cubas Grau and current Senator Mirta Gusinky. Law enforcement authorities eventually found Cubas’ body in a grave outside Asunción, despite the payment of a $350,000 ransom. The kidnappers justified the killing by claiming that the payment was not a ransom, but a “fine against Cubas’ parents.” That year, the EPP kidnapped rancher Luis Lindstron, who remained in captivity from June 21 until September 12, when his family paid a ransom. But in 2013, Lindstron was killed, allegedly by the EPP. Law enforcement authorities suspected the EPP killed Lindstron because he was not willing to pay a “toll” to the terrorist group. Kidnappings for ransom The Military and police are continuing to work hard to secure the release of Police Master Sergeant Edelio Morínigo, who was kidnapped by the EPP on July 5, 2014. The EPP has not demanded a ransom, but instead proposed a trade, offering to free Morínigo in exchange for the release of 46 EPP members who had been sentenced to prison. The FTC confronts the ACA On April 2, 2014, the EPP kidnapped Arlan Fick, 16. His father, Alcido Fick, paid $500,000 for his release. The terrorist group held Fick for 267 days before releasing him on Christmas Day. While the FTC did not rescue him, it helped make sure he was released safely. Security forces have also made great advances in fighting the EPP, according to Colonel Jorge Mieres, director of the Army’s Social Communications Division (DICOSO). In recent years, the Prosecutor’s Office has obtained convictions against 46 individuals who confessed to being members of the EPP. On April 2, 2014, the EPP kidnapped Arlan Fick, 16. His father, Alcido Fick, paid $500,000 for his release. The terrorist group held Fick for 267 days before releasing him on Christmas Day. While the FTC did not rescue him, it helped make sure he was released safely. The government rejected the idea. “The government will not negotiate with terrorists,” Minister of Interior Francisco De Vargas said on December 25 in a telephone conversation with Telefuturo (Channel 4).last_img read more

The Organic Chicken’s Story


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Summer is right around the corner.Time for cold beer, burgers on the grill, SPF 30 on the beach, and weekend escapes with the convertible top down.Farmers’ markets have bloomed everywhere, filled with organic foods by the bushel.But have you noticed that organic foods seem a little different this year?Suddenly, it’s no longer enough just to be labeled “organic.” Now everything organic has to come with a little story.From leaf lettuce “carefully tended by dedicated gourmet vegetarian monks,” to beef cattle “pampered by sensitive cowboys on isolated ranches in Wyoming,” the stories get more and more creative.Organic foods now compete with other organic foods for the best “back story,” to use Hollywood screenwriters’ favorite word.And even writing a menu for an organic restaurant is now an officially sanctioned academic course at some schools.Example: Do you only want a “Cobb Salad”?Or would you rather have “Fourme d’Ambert, preservative-free Applewood Smoked Bacon, Buttermilk ‘Panna Cotta’ from specially-bred Guernsey Cows, organic-certified Romaine Lettuce, Free-Range Hard Boiled Egg and Scallion Salad” on your plate?Same thing, my friends.So here’s the story of an organic chicken. We’ll call her Melinda.Melinda was hatched into a wonderful, loving family, as you might expect.And she was raised properly on a farm in Utopia, Vermont. That is, she grew up pecking away at organic corn and nine other natural grains, and she greatly enjoyed listening to Mozart’s beautiful “Piano Concerto in G Major, K. 453,” which was piped into her coop.The occasional yoga class kept her flexible, fit and helped her achieve a harmonious relationship with her barnyard world.A good-natured, sociable chicken, Melinda learned the art of meditation from her mother, one of the first Buddhist chickens in the coop. She learned that if she led a good life, she might eventually attain chicken nirvana.But also being a down-to-Earth bird, so to speak, Melinda knew that she would probably come back to Earth several times in various incarnations. In her next life, she hoped to return as a golden retriever, after enviously watching several on the farm who seemed to be eternally happy and filled with joy at the sight of something as simple as a small yellow ball.Melinda was, of course, a free-range chicken, which gave her the comforting illusion that she could wander around without care for the rest of her natural life.She loved the wholesome grain, the gentle breeze, the sun on her beak, the stars at night and the 15,000 other young chickens with whom she shared her cozy home.All in all, Melinda was the ideal organic chicken—with the perfect credentials to wind up in our local farmers’ market the other day: free-range, grain-fed, hormone-free, antibiotic-free, relaxed, at peace with herself, and looking forward to a happy afterlife.Melinda was priced at 10.50 a pound. (Hey, good “back stories” don’t come cheap. Also note that, following the advice of marketing gurus, I didn’t use the $ sign. Research tells us that would make Melinda look too expensive.)It’s a big, organic world out there—more than $30 billion worth of organic food is now sold every year in our country.So whether you buy chemically-free, or non-GMO, or naturally-sedated or whatever, as the Cockneys say in London, “you pays your money and you takes your choice.”It all comes down to whose story you believe.last_img read more

Muslim Teen’s Arrest In Texas Over Homemade Clock Sparks Outrage


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The arrest of a 14-year-old Muslim high school student in Texas for bringing a homemade clock to class has sparked a national uproar about Islamophobia.Mohamed Ahmed, an eighth grader at MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas, has an affinity for building electronic gadgets in his bedroom. He rose to fame overnight as social media erupted over his controversial arrest on Monday. By Wednesday afternoon, he’d been invited to meet President Obama at the White House–with the clock in hand.Ahmed’s whirlwind ordeal began when he decided to bring it to school to impress his teachers. One science teacher complimented Ahmed but warned him not to show it to anyone else. Acting on his teacher’s advice, Ahmed left it in his schoolbag. But the clock’s alarm sounded during his sixth-period English class, prompting that teacher to notify the principal and confiscate the clock, which Ahmed had built at his home in 20 minutes.“It looks like a bomb,” the teacher purportedly told Ahmed, according to the Dallas Morning News.“I told her, ‘It doesn’t look like a bomb to me,’” Ahmed replied.Ahmed was eventually led into the principal’s office with a police escort. He was handcuffed despite vehemently explaining that the presumed “bomb” was indeed a working clock, according to news reports.“We have no information that he claimed it was a bomb,” said Irving Police spokesperson James McLellan, according to the Dallas Morning News. “He kept maintaining it was a clock, but there was no broader explanation.”Following his arrest, a photo of Ahmed in handcuffs surfaced on social media. The hashtag #IStandWithAhmed became the No. 1 trending topic on Twitter Wednesday morning, featuring a bevy of support and Tweets lampooning police and school officials for what many considered an overreaction and an example of blatant American Islamophobia. Dr. Hussein Rashid, an adjunct assistant professor of religion at Hofstra University and founder of the consultancy group islamicate, L3C, which focuses on religious literacy and cultural competency, began laughing when he was asked about Ahmed’s arrest.“I’m utterly flabbergasted,” said Rashid. “You got to think about the multiple failures that had to happen here, right? A student who wants to prove he’s good in science goes to his teacher and says, ‘I am a good student.’”Rashid criticized the teacher and school administration in Texas for involving law enforcement.“It’s a perfect storm of social factors,” continued Rashid. “There’s a culture of Islamophobia, where your first thought anytime you see a brown person acting smart is that they must be a terrorist because we’ve got this long history of racism where people of color are inherently stupid. And then, so a brown, smart person is a terrorist.”When it was first revealed that the NYPD was spying on Muslim communities on Long Island, the five boroughs and in New Jersey, Muslim groups said such tactics would discourage members of the community to speak their mind, and in some cases pray at their mosque, out of fear that something they say or do could make them a target of law enforcement.“This has a real impact beyond getting eighth graders arrested for trying to impress the teacher,” Rashid added. “This has a very casual [message]: we’re all being surveyed right now.”Dr. Isma Chaudhry, president of Westbury’s Islamic Center of Long Island, was mystified when a Press reporter informed her of Ahmed’s arrest in Texas.“For how long will ethnic minorities walk on eggshells?” she asked. “That is not right. It’s counterproductive to everything, every belief, that we as Americans have. It doesn’t have to be a religious belief, but a belief in freedom of an individual living a peaceful life. Ethnic minorities have to constantly prove themselves because of a certain name or because of a skin color or because of hair color or eye color.”MacArthur High School in Irving released a statement following Ahmed’s arrest, noting that the Irving Police Department had responded to a “suspicious looking item on campus.”“We are pleased to report that after the police department’s assessment, the item discovered at school did not pose a threat to your child’s safety,” said the statement.Irving police said Wednesday that Ahmed would not face criminal charges.Ahmed, who has been bombarded with interview requests, thanked his supporters on Twitter. President Obama showed his support by inviting Ahmed—and his clock—to the White House.last_img read more

Coram Man Sentenced for Fatal DWI Crash


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Coram man was sentenced Wednesday to three to six years in prison for causing a crash that killed a 28-year-old man in Deer Park two years ago.Stephan Harbison had pleaded guilty at Suffolk County court to driving while intoxicated and vehicular manslaughter.Prosecutors said the 28-year-old man was driving on Straight Path when he crashed into a tree in January 2015.His passenger, Hamzah Abdul-Hakim, of Wyandanch, was pronounced dead at the scene.Harbison had a blood alcohol content of 0.15 percent, nearly double the legal limit at the time of the crash, authorities said.last_img read more

7 authentication strategies to reduce fraud


first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The recent Door Dash breach impacted 4.9 million consumers—a powerful reminder that our members’ data is at risk of exposure at any given moment.Criminals often leverage information stolen from a data breach to gain fraudulent access and attack consumers’ bank or credit union accounts. Though we cannot stop these external data breaches from happening, we can protect our institutions and members with a variety of data protection practices. Adopting sound authentication methods to verify a person’s identity makes it much harder for an individual to provide false credentials and perform fraud. Consider these authentication strategies to safeguard your credit union: continue reading »last_img read more

Single-Engine Plane Crashes In Syosset, 3 Dead


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Christopher Twarowski, Rashed Mian and Michael ConfortiA single-engine plane crashed in Syosset Tuesday afternoon, killing its three occupants, sending nearby school children and faculty scrambling for cover, and drawing local first responders to the scene in and around Cold Spring Road. Students reported hearing a loud explosion and seeing debris falling from the sky in the vicinity of Syosset High School and South Woods Middle School.The FAA confirmed the aircraft as a Beech BE35, which crashed at 3:39 p.m. on its way to Robertson Field in Plainville, CT from Myrtle Beach, SC.A Nassau County police spokesperson at the scene described a large debris field and potential damage to nearby homes. Police and county officials did not elaborate on a probable cause of the accident.The Syosset School District sent an automated message around 4 p.m. informing parents that an incident had occurred at approximately 3:40 p.m. and that police were requesting South Woods Middle School, Berry Hill Elementary School and Syosset High School personnel and children to remain indoors and that parents delay coming to the school until further notice.Syosset Fire Department was searching the area and recovering and securing debris. Adjacent roads to the crash site were closed.Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano, on the scene, called the accident “tragic,” confirming that all three passengers had been killed, and that the pilot of the doomed craft had sent out a “mayday” that was received at Republic Airport in Farmingdale.He added that the aircraft could hold up to seven passengers.Lisa DeVito, who lives on Cold Spring Road, told the Press at the scene that she heard a “buzz like a zzzzz—and then boom!“But it didn’t sound like an explosion,” she added, rather it “sounded like they dropped a tree trunk.”DeVito said she observed what appeared to be a dead body in the middle of a street adjacent to her home, but did not see any debris nearby.Jeanine DeStefani, another nearby resident, said she received calls from her two children asking whether she was okay. Her seventh-grader, who attends South Woods Middle School, was at lacrosse practice when the incident occurred and told her he saw debris falling from the sky.“They heard a pop,” she said.The FAA will investigate the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause, said the agency.last_img read more

MRT Jakarta to chop down 867 trees for phase 2 construction


first_imgSilvia stressed that the whole process would be carried out in compliance with the prevailing rules, with the company consulting the Jakarta Parks and Urban Forestry Agency prior to commencing the removal of the greenery.“We have examined the trees and reported to the Jakarta Parks and Urban Forestry Agency to seek guidance on whether the trees should be replaced and what species [should be replanted],” Silvia told reporters recently.Provisions for replanting are laid out in Jakarta Governor Decree No. 792/1997.Meanwhile, the agency has identified 214 healthy trees that will be able to be transplanted, while another 653 trees in a poorer condition will need to be removed and replaced with 1,863 new trees. Hundreds of trees on roadside green belts in Central Jakarta are to be cut down to make way for the phase 2 development of the MRT line, which is currently under way, the developer has said.A total of 867 trees growing along Jl. MH Thamrin, the National Monument (Monas) complex and Jl. Museum will be relocated or replaced, PT MRT Jakarta construction director Silvia Halim said recently.The process began last week and is expected to be finished within two months, said the official of the city-owned transportation company. A healthy tree is one that has a high chance of survival and a long lifespan.At the Monas complex, which is one of the capital’s largest green spaces, the company will be replanting with trees that have a diameter of more than 40 centimeters, while trees that are to be replanted along Jl. MH Thamrin will range in size from 10-25 cm in diameter.The trees that are to be chopped down because of their poor condition or short lifespan will be brought to the parks agency’s lumber yard in Pondok Pinang, South Jakarta, for processing. “They will be processed so as to provide added value, instead of just being disposed of,” Silvia said.Read also: Jakarta MRT developer keen not to dig up trouble in route expansionThe trees that potentially have a longer lifespan will be relocated to the southern side of the Monas complex and a forest nursery in Srengseng, West Jakarta, that is managed by the agency.Twelve types of trees will be replanted by MRT Jakarta including trembesi (Albizia saman), tabebuya (Handroanthus chrysotrichus), bungur (Lagerstroemia sp.), pulai (Alstonia scholaris), damar (Dipterocarpaceae sp.) and flamboyan (Delonix regia).The entire process will require approximately Rp 5 billion (US$339,170), said MRT Jakarta president director William Sabandar.Besides land acquisition, upholding environmental sustainability and the preservation of cultural heritage sites will continue to be crucial aspects in the development of the MRT line in Jakarta, which aims to create a total network of 240 kilometers of railway track over the next few years.In the first phase of the MRT development, the company had to remove some 1,500 trees along its planned route.Earlier this year, city authorities were on the receiving end of criticism over the removal of hundreds of trees in the Monas complex.However, Jakarta is beginning to gain global recognition in its efforts to implement sustainable development in transportation, as it embarks on a long-term plan to develop integrated transportation systems.Read also: Jakarta wins ‘honorable mention’ for sustainable transportationThe development of MRT phase 2A in Jakarta spans 5.8 kilometers from Bundaran HI Station in Central Jakarta to the Kota Tua district in West Jakarta, consisting of seven underground stations. It is scheduled to be completed by March 2026.The phase 2B plan will add two elevated stations from Kota to the train depot in Ancol, North Jakarta.Construction officially commenced on July 15 when the contractor started work on contract package 201 – the construction of a 2.67-kilometer underground tunnel between the Bundaran HI and Monas stations. It is scheduled to be completed within five years.The Jakarta Transportation Agency has partly closed one lane on either side of Jl. MH Thamrin, which are impacted by the project, starting from in front of the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) building and heading north until the Bank Indonesia complex, and from in front of the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry heading south until the Thamrin 10 building on the other side of the road.Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Touts SAP America Expansion Across Pennsylvania


first_imgGovernor Wolf Touts SAP America Expansion Across Pennsylvania SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Economy,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf joined company executives at the SAP America’s U.S. headquarters in Newtown Township, Delaware County. While on site the governor addressed employees at SAP’s ‘All Hands’ staff meeting and toured the growing facility.“Earlier this year I was thrilled to announce SAP’s commitment to expand and create jobs in Pennsylvania and today I am excited to have the opportunity to see the company’s plans first hand,” Governor Wolf said. “It’s always inspiring to engage with employees as they showcase their innovative work. I’m thrilled that this work will continue to be done in the commonwealth for years to come.”During the address, Governor Wolf praised SAP’s recent commitment to add nearly 400 jobs and outlined the administration’s job creation initiatives across the commonwealth.Coordinated by the Governor’s Action Team, earlier this year, Governor Wolf announced SAP’s plans to create 392 new, full-time jobs statewide over the next three years – 242 jobs at the company’s Pittsburgh location and 150 jobs at its U.S. headquarters in Newtown Township, adding to its existing Pennsylvania-based workforce of more than 3,305 employees.“SAP has a proud history of growth, innovation and investment in the commonwealth, and we were honored to host the governor at our North America headquarters to highlight SAP’s best-in-industry talent and technology,” said Jennifer Morgan, executive board member, SAP. “We’re proud to call Pennsylvania home and we’re especially proud to call many agencies across the government of the commonwealth valued customers and partners in innovation. We look forward to writing the next chapter of growth here and continuing to keep Pennsylvania out in front and a best-run state.”Founded in 1972, SAP is the world’s largest business software company, with over 82,000 employees globally, including more than 18,000 in the United States. Its applications address the needs of small businesses, midsized companies, and global organizations. In total, SAP’s applications serve more than 320,000 customers in 190 countries.center_img August 24, 2017last_img read more