18 days agoJuventus goalscorer Higuain: We won with great character and determination


first_imgJuventus goalscorer Higuain: We won with great character and determinationby Carlos Volcano18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus goalscorer Gonzalo Higuain was delighted with the manner of victory over Inter Milan.The Argentine came off the bench to score the winner in the 2-1 triumph.“It was a great game from Juve. Inter were the most solid side in the league, they had won six out of six,” Pipita told Sky Sport Italia.“We played with great character and determination. I am glad we took it home.“This is a great start to the season, but it’s still early and we want to fight on all fronts.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Swedish cable operator Com Hems board has agreed


first_imgSwedish cable operator Com Hem’s board has agreed to launch a share buyback programme totaling SEK1.5 billion (€160 million) over the next year.The buyback will enable Com Hem to distribute funds to shareholders. Together with an ordinary dividend of SEK1 per share, the programme means that Com Hem has allocated SEK1.7 billion to be repaid to its shareholders.Com Hem’s share capital will be reduced by cancelling the shares that has been repurchased.last_img

John Enser UKlicensed European channels face a pe


first_imgJohn EnserUK-licensed European channels face a period of uncertainty after last night’s Brexit vote, according to industry sources. Hundreds of networks within the European Union are licensed out of the UK by communications regulator Ofcom.With UK voters opting to leave the EU, the status of these licences, and how the channels will ensure their licences are valid in member states remains unclearOfcom could not immediately clarify how many channels are UK-licensed and operating in EU territories, but there are thought to be several hundred.Member states are required to recognise the licences as the UK is a fellow member state, but as the country sets about withdrawing from the EU one source said the situation for channels was ‘confusion upon confusion’.There are various possibilities in terms of ensuring the UK-based channels can continue to operate such as bilateral trade agreements, general agreements (GATs) on trade services as operated by the World Trade Organisation, or a Norwegian model whereby EEA membership gives access to the EU internal market.Amid the uncertainty, one legal expert said a Council of Europe convention on Transfontier television could ensure channels can continue to operate in EU territories.Olswang partner John Enser said the Council of Europe agreement is outdated, but should offer the the UK channels some guarantees regarding their transmission in Europe.“It is similar to the original TV Without Frontiers directive, although is old fashioned in the sense it doesn’t cover on-demand services and may have different requirements on ad minutage,” Enser said. “But it does have the same broad principles, and the geographical reach is the same.”The challenge for UK channels groups is likely to come from ensuring their staff can move quickly and easily throughout the EU.“If groups doing the [channel] distribution deals are based in London and start to need work permits and visas to travel you could see groups start to relocate elsewhere,” Enser said.Channels and industry groups, meanwhile, are weighing the consequence of the vote for their operations, and few were willing to comment publicly today.Bertelsamann, parent to channel operator RTL, was one that did react officially and said it regretted the Brexit vote. “As an international company with a strong presence in the UK as elsewhere, Britain’s impending exit from the EU raises political and economic uncertainties for us all,” Bertelsmann said.“Irrespective of the Brexit decision, the UK, as our fourth-largest market, remains very important to us. Bertelsmann generates revenues of around €1.7 billion with 5,500 employees in the UK, and will continue to invest in its businesses there.”last_img read more

BT was the UKs most complained about pay TV provi


first_imgBT was the UK’s most complained about pay TV provider in regulator Ofcom’s latest quarterly league table of complaints relating to service providers.The report eveals the number of complaints made to Ofcom about the UK’s largest providers of home broadband, landline telephone, pay-monthly mobile and pay TV services, between October and December last year.BT generated 18 pay TV complaints per 100,000 subscribers, well ahead of second-placed TalkTalk, with 10 complaints per 100,000, and third-placed Virgin Media, with nine.Sky was the least complained-about pay TV service provider, with only two complaints per 100,000.The list means that BT has consistently underperformed its peers over the last couple of years in terms of the number of pay TV complaints generated. The ordering of service providers has also remained consistent, with TalkTalk and Virgin Media underperforming Sky.Pay TV has historically generated relatively fewer complaints that fixed broadband, fixed telephony and mobile telephony, but while complaints about other services have declined over time, the number of pay TV complaints has remained broadly constant. For the last quarter, contract mobile complaints declined to level pegging with pay TV for the first time.TalkTalk was the most complained-about broadband provider, with 31 complaints per 100,000, ahead of second-placed BT and third-placed Plusnet. Sky was the least complained-about broadband provider. TalkTalk was also the most complained-about landline phone provider, while BT and Vodafone were jointly the most complained-about contract mobile phone providers.last_img read more

New microfluidic device can isolate individual cancer cells from blood samples


first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 26 2019Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia, have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples. The microfluidic device works by separating the various cell types found in blood by their size. The device may one day enable rapid, cheap liquid biopsies to help detect cancer and develop targeted treatment plans. The findings are reported in the journal Microsystems & Nanoengineering.”This new microfluidics chip lets us separate cancer cells from whole blood or minimally-diluted blood,” said Ian Papautsky, the Richard and Loan Hill Professor of Bioengineering in the UIC College of Engineering and corresponding author on the paper. “While devices for detecting cancer cells circulating in the blood are becoming available, most are relatively expensive and are out of reach of many research labs or hospitals. Our device is cheap, and doesn’t require much specimen preparation or dilution, making it fast and easy to use.”The ability to successfully isolate cancer cells is a crucial step in enabling liquid biopsy where cancer could be detected through a simple blood draw. This would eliminate the discomfort and cost of tissue biopsies which use needles or surgical procedures as part of cancer diagnosis. Liquid biopsy could also be useful in tracking the efficacy of chemotherapy over the course of time, and for detecting cancer in organs difficult to access through traditional biopsy techniques, including the brain and lungs.However, isolating circulating tumor cells from the blood is no easy task, since they are present in extremely small quantities. For many cancers, circulating cells are present at levels close to one per 1 billion blood cells. “A 7.5-milliliter tube of blood, which is a typical volume for a blood draw, might have ten cancer cells and 35-40 billion blood cells,” said Papautsky. “So we are really looking for a needle in a haystack.”Microfluidic technologies present an alternative to traditional methods of cell detection in fluids. These devices either use markers to capture targeted cells as they float by, or they take advantage of the physical properties of targeted cells — mainly size — to separate them from other cells present in fluids.Papautsky and his colleagues developed a device that uses size to separate tumor cells from blood. “Using size differences to separate cell types within a fluid is much easier than affinity separation which uses ‘sticky’ tags that capture the right cell type as it goes by,” said Papautsky. “Affinity separation also requires a lot of advanced purification work which size separation techniques don’t need.”Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerThe device Papautsky and his colleagues developed capitalizes on the phenomena of inertial migration and shear-induced diffusion to separate cancer cells from blood as it passes through ‘microchannels’ formed in plastic. “We are still investigating the physics behind these phenomena and their interplay in the device, but it separates cells based on tiny differences in size which dictate the cell’s attraction to various locations within a column of liquid as it moves.”Papautsky and his colleagues ‘spiked’ 5-milliliter samples of healthy blood with 10 small-cell-lung cancer cells and then ran the blood through their device. They were able to recover 93 percent of the cancer cells using the microfluidic device. Previously-developed microfluidics devices designed to separate circulating tumor cells from blood had recovery rates between 50 percent and 80 percent.When they ran eight samples of blood taken from patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer, they were able to separate cancer cells from six of the samples using the microfluidic device.In addition to the high efficiency and reliability of the devices, Papautsky said the fact that little dilution is needed is another plus. “Without having to dilute, the time to run samples is shorter and so is preparation time.” They used whole blood in their experiments as well as blood diluted just three times, which is low compared to other protocols for cell separation using devices based on inertial migration.Papautsky and colleague Dr. Alicia Hubert, assistant professor of surgery in the UIC College of Medicine, recently received a $125,000, one-year grant from the University of Illinois Cancer Center to develop a microfluidics device that can separate out circulating tumor cells as well as detect DNA from cancer cells in blood from lung cancer patients. They will use blood from patients being seen at the University of Illinois Cancer Center to test the efficacy of their prototype device. Source:https://today.uic.edu/new-microfluidics-device-can-detect-cancer-cells-in-bloodlast_img read more

Disruptive behaviors in autistic children linked to reduced brain connectivity


first_img Source:https://news.yale.edu/2019/04/18/behavioral-disorders-kids-autism-linked-lower-brain-connectivity Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 19 2019More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.”Disruptive behaviors such as aggression, irritability, and noncompliance are common in children with autism, and are among the main reasons for psychiatric treatment and even hospitalization,” said Denis Sukhodolsky, senior author and associate professor in the Yale Child Study Center. “Yet, little is known about the biological underpinnings of behavioral problems in children with autism.”Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsThe first of its kind, the Yale study used fMRI scans conducted during an emotion perception task to compare the brain activity of autistic children who do and do not exhibit disruptive behavior. While in the scanner, the children were asked to view pictures of human faces that displayed calm or fearful expressions.During the task, the researchers found reduced connectivity between the amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex — a pathway critical to the regulation of emotion — in the brains of children who exhibit disruptive behavior as compared to the brains of children who do not. “Reduced amygdala-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity was uniquely associated with disruptive behavior but not with severity of social deficits or anxiety, suggesting a distinct brain network that could be separate from core autism symptoms,” explained Karim Ibrahim, first author and postdoctoral fellow in the Sukhodolsky lab.”This finding points to a brain mechanism of emotion dysregulation in children with autism and offers a potential biomarker for developing targeted treatments for irritability and aggression in autism,” said Sukhodolsky.last_img read more

Opioid poisoning rates higher and in a more diverse population study shows


first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 21 2019A cohort study by Stony Brook University researchers of all payer hospital data on Long Island combined with census data indicates that opioid poisoning (OP) levels almost doubled from 2010 to 2016. Additionally, the study revealed that the demographics of patients with OP appears to be shifting and becoming more diverse. The findings are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Not enough is known about the epidemiology of OP to tailor interventions to help address the growing opioid crisis in the U.S. According the National Center for Health Statistics, New York State is one of five states with the most opioid drug overdoses. The objective of the Stony Brook study is to expand understanding about OP through the use of data analytics to evaluate geographic, temporal, and socioeconomic differences of OP related hospital visits in a region of New York State with high OP rates. Related Stories’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesThrough the data analysis, Wang and colleagues found that OP hospital visit rates increased 2.5 to 2.7 fold on Long Island since 2010. OP hospital visit rates decreased for men, whites and self-pay patients but increased for Medicare payers. Communities with high OP rates had lower median home values regardless of location, higher percentages of high school graduates, were younger and more often were white patients.These findings reveal that OP is becoming more diverse by gender, age, economics and location. Historically, on a national level the highest OP rates have been among young adults (18-34) who are white male, urban dwellers, and those with lower income and non-private payers.According to Wang, the research team will engage other researchers to build a nationwide data-driven opioid epidemic research community. He said their method and findings provide a foundation to build a precision public health-based framework for opioid epidemic research through integrative spatial-temporal based analytical methods for population studies. The long-term goal of the research will also be to develop a machine learning-based framework for predicting OP risks of patients using integrative electronic health records to support clinical decisions. Source:Stony Brook University We believe our method and use of data analytics tools to identify regions and patient populations may help to focus on effective interventions. These population identification techniques can also potentially be applied to other communities anywhere in the United States to focus on interventions.”Fusheng Wang, PhD, lead author and Associate Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Informatics in the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University and in Computer Sciencelast_img read more

German airports brace for Thursday strike


first_img Citation: German airports brace for Thursday strike (2019, January 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-german-airports-brace-thursday.html © 2019 AFP Flights scrapped as Berlin airports brace for Monday strike The walkout was to begin at 3:00 am (0200 GMT) in the airports of Dusseldorf, Cologne-Bonn and Stuttgart, and was to continue until midnight, the union said Wednesday.A warning strike took place on Monday morning at Berlin’s two airports, Tegel and Schoenefeld, forcing the cancellation of about 50 flights.Verdi, which represents 23,000 airport security personnel, wants wages raised to 20 euros ($23) an hour from around 17 euros currently, an increase of around 17 percent.The BDLS employers association has offered pay increases of between 2.0 and 8.1 percent.The next round of talks is scheduled for January 23. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img A warning strike took place on Monday morning at Berlin’s two airports, forcing the cancelation of about 50 flights. Explore further Thousands of passengers in Germany face disruption on Thursday following a strike call by security staff at three major airports, the powerful Verdi union said.last_img read more

A new method for ethical data science


first_img Citation: A new method for ethical data science (2019, March 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-method-ethical-science.html A less technical way of looking at it is that people, fundamentally, are team players: they want to fit in and may find it difficult to criticise the work of their close colleagues. They might also become subject to ‘group think’ without realising it.In Wellcome Data Labs we have worked out a paired approach to Agile ethics which is intended to resolve this issue. Our proposed methodology has three steps:Embedding within Data Labs a user researcher with a background both in working as part of Agile product teams and in carrying out social sciences research. This embedded researcher will have the explicitly defined objective of testing the algorithmic models the software developers and data scientists are working on from the point of view of their possible social impact.They will adjust and develop their analysis iteratively to match the speed of the technology work and feed their emergent conclusions back to the data scientists to steer the course of their work.The embedded researcher will be paired up with another social scientist outside the team to provide an objective critique and the necessary checks and balances on their analysis.All three parts of the proposed methodology are equally important.Not embedding the researcher in the team would make it hard for them to have a close enough knowledge of what the data scientists are doing.Not iteratively retesting and rewriting their analysis of possible social impact will fail to match the rhythm of the technological development  –  the key proposed advantage of this methodology.Finally, the pairing is designed to prevent the embedded researcher risking a loss of their professional detachment and objectivity, which is a risk precisely because they are so closely embedded within the technology teams.This whole approach is an experiment in itself and we are not at all certain that it will work. However, that is exactly what makes it exciting to us. We hope it will help us become better aware of the biases being introduced by the algorithms that we develop and minimise any potential negative unintentional consequences of the tools the team produces.This is important because Wellcome, as a significant funder of scientific research, has a notable impact on the academic and health industries. And Wellcome Data Labs’ analysis feeds into Wellcome’s decision making process. Any unintended biases in the algorithms my team produces that can impact Wellcome’s decisions, could have a ripple effect on the decisions of more funders, which in turn could cascade down to secondary impacts on other industries and the wider society. We have a responsibility to get it right. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Artificial Intelligence is transforming our world, sometimes in ways that its creators did not intend. In Wellcome Data Labs we are developing a new method of applying approaches from the social sciences to the way AI algorithms are produced to solve data science problems. The goal is to avoid potential negative consequences of the algorithms by identifying them earlier in the development process.center_img Provided by Wellcome Trust There have been attempts to set out such a way of working already. An example is Catalina Butnaru’s excellent post proposing a new Agile ethics process. There is much to recommend this approach, not least that it is systematic and aligned closely in its steps to well-known steps of agile software development methodologies.However, Butnaru does not address the mechanics of how her suggested Agile ethics process could be managed. Is it the team of data scientists and engineers themselves who are responsible for following the steps? Or their product manager? Or the UX team? Or a separate team to the engineers that audits their work?We have been thinking about such questions a lot, since we are keen to test out how ethical approaches can be applied to the work of data scientists in practice and not just in theory.The key challenge we set ourselves is: how to apply a process such as Butnaru’s, or one of the other rival methodologies, in a way that measurably reduces ethical issues, like inadvertent bias, but does not reduce the energy and effectiveness of our Agile product teams?We think this can be done by encouraging social scientists to work as part of interdisciplinary teams with software developers and data scientists, adopting their agile and iterative methodologies.I have outlined some of the challenges of doing this. For example, the difficulty of getting social science researchers to work at the same speed and to the same rhythm as the software developers and data scientists. However, there is a potential template to follow by learning from the successful integration of the User Experience discipline into the software development workflows.There is an additional challenge, though. Relying on a user researcher embedded in a product team to steer that team through an Agile ethics methodology on their own introduces the risk of them losing objectivity. This is a well-known issue in ethnographic research, where there is an active tension between a researcher’s role as an impartial observer and the alternative of being an active participant. A framework for AI-powered agile project managementlast_img read more

Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland


first_img Editor’s note: This article was updated to fix a statement about the interpretation of the cannabis pollen. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo Photos: Viking Warrior Is Actually a Woman 30 of the World’s Most Valuable Treasures That Are Still Missing The discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America. The researchers also found evidence the Vikings occupied this outpost for more than a century, way longer than previously believed. Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L’Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period. The new research, published today (July 15) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that the Vikings lived there possibly into the 12th or even the 13th century. [In Photos: Viking Outposts Possibly Found in Canada]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65940-were-vikings-smoking-pot-in-newfoundland.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Bog finds In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of “ecofacts” — environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans — that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland — Simplocaria metallica, from Greenland, and Acidota quadrata, from the Arctic. The layer also held pollen from Juglans (walnuts) and from Humulus (cannabis), two species that don’t naturally grow at L’Anse aux Meadows; rather, the Vikings could have picked up all of these plant and animal species when they sailed south. [Photos: 10th-Century Viking Tomb Unearthed in Denmark] They also found the remains of dung from grazing caribou, as well as remains of wood and charcoal. The layer from the peat bog is similar to other “cultural layers from across the Norse North Atlantic,” the archaeological team wrote in the journal article. More evidence Additionally, the archaeologists performed Bayesian analysis — a type of statistical analysis — on radiocarbon dates from artifacts previously excavated at L’Anse aux Meadows. That analysis also suggested Viking occupation for up to 200 years. “This does not imply a continuous occupation,” the researchers wrote, noting that the Vikings could have abandoned and reoccupied L’Anse aux Meadows when it suited them. Did the Vikings use pot in Newfoundland? The finding of cannabis pollen raises the question of whether the Vikings used cannabis for making clothes or for medicinal-recreational purposes while they explored North America. Paul Ledger, the lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at Memorial University of Newfoundland urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. Ledger urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. It’s also possible that some of the other “ecofacts” were brought to the peat bog by indigenous peoples who lived in Newfoundland, and not by the Vikings. [Fierce Fighters: 7 Secrets of Viking Seamen] Ultimately, “the results presented here [in the journal article] pose more questions than answers,” the archaeological team wrote. Reaction from other Viking researchers Viking researchers not affiliated with the research team urged caution about the results. “I think it is too early to draw any conclusions,” said Birgitta Wallace, a senior archaeologist emerita with Parks Canada who has done extensive research on the Vikings in North America. Wallace told Live Science that she isn’t convinced that the Vikings left behind these ecofacts. “I think it is highly unlikely that the Norse [another word for Vikings] would have returned in the 12th and 13th centuries, as there are no structures on the site from that period that could be Norse,” Wallace said. “We do know that there were indigenous people, ancestors of the Beothuk, on the site at that time.” Patricia Sutherland, a visiting scientist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who has also done extensive research on the Vikings in North America, said that while the Vikings could have been in Newfoundland during the 12th or 13th centuries, it is too early to say for sure. “It seems premature to suggest such a scenario on the basis of the ‘ecofacts’ listed in the paper,” Sutherland said. It’s possible that some of the beetles and plant pollen found in the layer were brought to L’Anse aux Meadows by the Vikings around A.D. 1000, and they continued to flourish after the Vikings left, Sutherland said. The research team plans to continue their work at L’Anse aux Meadows in August, Ledger said. The 25 Most Mysterious Archaeological Finds on Earthlast_img read more

Train carrying water from Jolarpettai arrives in parched Chennai


first_img Next Train carrying water from Jolarpettai arrives in parched ChennaiThe train with 50 tank wagons (BTPN), carrying 50,000 litres of water in each of them from Jolarpettai in Tamil Nadu’s Vellore district, reached the filling station at the Integral Coach Factory in Villivakkam Friday afternoon.advertisement Press Trust of India ChennaiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 14:15 IST Around 100 inlet pipes installed near the railway tracks would be used to discharge 2.5 million litres of water. (Photo: IANS)A train carrying 2.5 million litres of water arrived in Chennai, which has been grappling with an acute water crisis over the past few months, officials said Friday.The train with 50 tank wagons (BTPN), carrying 50,000 litres of water in each of them from Jolarpettai in Tamil Nadu’s Vellore district, reached the filling station at the Integral Coach Factory in Villivakkam Friday afternoon.Around 100 inlet pipes installed near the railway tracks would be used to discharge 2.5 million litres of water in all the wagons to be sent to a treatment plant after passing through a conduit, an official of Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board said.”After treatment it would be sent for distribution. This arrangement has been made for the next six months until the (advent of the) north-east monsoon,” the official told PTI.The train was supposed to reach Chennai on Thursday, but leakages in the valves led to the delay. Jolarpettai is 217 km away from the southern metropolis.All the arrangements took around 20 days of time to complete.The initiative would be formally inaugurated by Tamil Nadu Ministers later in the day, the official said.Chennai has been grappling with an acute water crisis over the past few months. The southern metropolis is facing a daily water deficit of at least 200 million litres, and the four reservoirs supplying to the city have run dry.The Tamil Nadu government had earlier requested the railways to help them ferry the water to the city.Earlier, Chief Minister K Palaniswami had announced mitigating Chennai’s water woes by getting drinking water supplied from Jolarpettai with an allocation of Rs 65 crore.ALSO READ | Water woes: Running out of time | India Today InsightALSO WATCH | Tamil Nadu remains on edge as state struggles to endure water crisisFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySnigdha Choudhurylast_img read more