Laudrup unhappy over denied penalty


first_img The West Ham substitute had his arm raised as he leapt to block a Nathan Dyer cross, and Laudrup had no doubt his side should have had a spot-kick. “I think we deserved more, but on the other hand Jaaskelainen had made two or three fantastic saves, so you can’t do anything about that,” he said. “There was a lot of emotion in the end which was about the penalty which was not given. “I know I always say that a referee or a linesman only has one second, but I mean it is so clear when you have your arm up like that. “If you have your arm down you can talk about hand to ball or ball to hand, but when you have your arm up there and it hits you, normally nine out of 10 times it is a penalty. “Of course when you have a case like this in the 91st minute, there are a lot of emotions. “But we know that the relationship between Swansea and penalties is not the best, even if we got one last weekend against Sunderland after 50-something (56) games. “Not to be funny, but maybe the fans and everybody here should buy a t-shirt to say that ‘I was there when Swansea got a penalty’. “But it is done and it’s gone and we can’t turn back. It’s just that when you have a situation like this, we have had penalties against us for things like that. “It is a reflex because no-one wants the ball in his hand but the rules are that if you move your arm and it touches, it is a penalty. But not today, maybe another day.” West Ham boss Sam Allardyce, who did not attend his post-match press conference, again opted to start with a side containing no recognised striker, and their 4-6-0 formation stymied Swansea’s passing game, while they carried a potent threat from set-pieces at the other end. But Laudrup was content with his side’s display as they look forward to next Sunday’s derby with local rivals Cardiff. “I knew it would be very difficult as they enjoyed huge success playing like this against Totteham, winning 3-0,” said Laudrup. “We knew they would play without a striker and with six in midfield and it is difficult. “You also know they are so good at set-pieces and we had some problems when they had four or five consecutively in the first half. “We don’t have the tallest guys but in the second half, despite not being at our best, we controlled it. “They sat very deep and Jaaskelainen was man of the match for me. “I always want to win but we move up the table and this is okay.” Allardyce felt his team had done enough to secure all three points, and believes the lack of a clinical edge in front of goal has hindered them so far this season. Allardyce told the BBC: “We should have had it over and done with by half-time. “We showed our classic counter-attacking football, but unfortunately finishing qualities let us down. “We limited Swansea to one header from a set-piece. In the second half we didn’t pass it as well as in the first. It’s disappointing. “It’s our fifth clean sheet in nine matches but we have only nine points in total and that’s not good enough. “If we scored in some of these matches we’d be sitting pretty. They were simple chances today and not difficult ones.” Swansea manager Michael Laudrup felt his side were denied a clear penalty during their 0-0 draw with West Ham at the Liberty Stadium. In a turgid game of few clear chances the Hammers’ dead-ball threat troubled their hosts all afternoon, with Angel Rangel hooking a long Razvan Rat free-kick off the line, while Guy Demel and Kevin Nolan also spurned sights of goal. Jussi Jaaskelainen made two point-blank stops to deny Chico Flores and Wilfried Bony at the other end, but the hosts were most aggrieved by referee Phil Dowd’s decision to turn down a stoppage-time appeal for handball against Joe Cole. Press Associationlast_img read more

Faridabad’s Muskan Jubbal Wins Karting Slalom Title


first_imgBengaluru: Faridabad’s Muskan Jubbal won the Karting Slalom crown to emerge as the star of the FIA Girls On Track (GOT) extravaganza here on Sunday evening.The GOT program, being held on the sidelines of the JK Tyre FMSCI National 4-stroke Karting Championship 2019, saw Muskan complete the course with an impressive timing of 1:40:91 minutes.Sharavantika Lakshmi won the second place with a timing of 1:51:62 mins while Noorul Sara cornered the third position by finishing the task in 1:53:24 minsIn the Biking Slalom, Sunita Deshar emerged victorious with a time of 1:35.34. Sandhya Saranya of Chennai (1:43:93) and Sanjana Mohanraj of Bengaluru (2:24:03) took the other two podium places.The Meco Kartopia track came alive this Sunday with over 50 girls, including 8 from Nepal participating in the GOT program.A handful of 8-year-olds too turned up to get initiated into motorsports along with teenagers and women in their twenties.They went through the entire drill of starting on racing simulators before eventually competing in the go-karting and biking slaloms. In between, they underwent a batak reflex test and a basic pit-stop to be set for proper racing.Meanwhile, it was business as usual for hardcore racers in the finals of the Round 1 of the Sodi Kart Sprint. IANSAlso Read: Rory Burns and Joe Root Help England to Reach 125/2Also Watch:AJYCP forms Human Chain against NHPC at Gogamukh in Dhemaji | The Sentinel News | Assam Newslast_img read more

Browne deserved a better experience


first_imgThere are times when sports are amazing, like when a team that hasn’t won a championship in 108 years finally breaks the drought and the viral video of an 81-year-old Cubs fan jumping for joy makes you feel all warm and fuzzy. Then, there are times when sports are sad and unfortunate and make you realize all of life’s cruelties — just ask Max Browne.The redshirt junior quarterback’s time at USC is winding down, and the clock probably couldn’t move faster for him. In a span of 10 weeks, Browne has gone from USC’s next heralded quarterback to an underperforming backup to a frustrated soldier looking to transfer and salvage his final season of eligibility.He had more than paid his dues to earn the starting job. Coming out of Skyline High School in Washington, Browne was one of the top quarterback recruits in the country. Analysts compared him to Peyton Manning. He had 11 other offers from schools ranging from Oklahoma to Alabama, yet he chose USC knowing that he would be competing with then-redshirt sophomores Cody Kessler and Max Wittek for the starting job.“As a quarterback growing up on the West Coast, at least for me personally, there was always the dream of growing up and being the quarterback for the Trojans,” he said to the Seattle Times after committing to USC in December of 2012.He probably didn’t anticipate having to wait four years for that dream to come true. He lost out to Kessler as a true freshman, and was redshirted. The following year, when Steve Sarkisian took over as head coach, Browne still could not beat Kessler for the starting job.He dutifully backed up Kessler last season in No. 6’s final year at USC. So with Kessler out of the picture, 2016 was finally supposed to be the once prized recruit’s time to shine.But then a monster in Alabama popped up on the schedule as the season opener, and Browne and the Trojans looked lost against the defending national champions. And there was Stanford waiting in Palo Alto in Week 3, where the offense looked stale and lackluster. Oh, and there was redshirt freshman Sam Darnold, a springy, dual-threat, dynamic quarterback who does nearly everything that Browne can’t.So staring down at a 1-2 record, an upcoming road game at Utah and his seat getting hotter by the second, head coach Clay Helton played the one asset in his back pocket: the quarterback card, swapping Browne for an unproven redshirt freshman. Darnold, in turn, has responded with incredible stats and crowd-dazzling plays to provide a much-needed spark to the Trojans’ season — and saving Helton’s job while at it. But Helton’s job security and Darnold’s rising star comes at Browne’s expense, and that hurts. Browne was the consummate professional, the loyal team player waiting for his chance. But at the first sign of trouble, he was flung to the side. It is hardly fair to judge what he would’ve done in a full season based on a three-game sample size, especially considering two of those games were against superior talent in Alabama and — at the time — a confident Pac-12 powerhouse in Stanford. “I look back on a few of those routes [against Stanford] and you’re kicking yourself a little bit, because that’s kind of what I’ve made my money on out here,” Browne said, trying to rationalize why he lost the starting job. Nonetheless, even the most ardent Browne supporters will admit Helton made the right call. Darnold is doing incredible things — single-handedly leading USC back into the Pac-12 South race — and the Trojans don’t have to worry about quarterback competitions for the next three years.What’s frustrating is that nobody did anything wrong here. Helton has been rightfully criticized for a number of decisions, but I’m not faulting him for giving the loyal Browne his long-awaited shot at quarterback, trusting that Browne’s talent as a former star recruit and his familiarity with the offense would outweigh the untapped potential in Darnold — despite the redshirt freshman impressing during both spring and fall camps. If my job was on the line, and I knew I had a wild card and potential lifesaver in Darnold, I would play that card 10 times out of 10. Likewise, no one can fault Darnold for seizing the day and putting any quarterback concerns to rest by starting his career 4-1.So now, Browne is left searching for playing time somewhere else — literally anywhere else.“I made sure my headline said ‘all NCAA schools’ for a reason: I’m willing to go anywhere,” Browne said after practice on Wednesday. “That was the case out of high school, and it’s no different, if not more emphasized, now.”It’s sad because the past four years at USC have done nothing to advance Browne’s football aspirations — if anything, they’ve made them worse. He has to play the recruiting game all over again, and if he wants playing time in his final season of eligibility, he probably won’t end up at a marquee program like USC.To be fair, the blame also falls on him. He had several chances to win the starting job, but Kessler was just better. When he finally did, he nearly lost — and eventually did lose — the position to a redshirt freshman. He could’ve made a much better first impression against Alabama, or could’ve hit the receivers he missed against Stanford. Perhaps he just isn’t as good as his recruiting status hyped him to be, or perhaps three years without regular game reps had a negative effect on him.But it all comes back to circumstance: If USC had started the season against three easy opponents, would Browne still be the quarterback? Instead, when Oregon visits the Coliseum on Saturday for Homecoming, fans will be singing the praises of Darnold, while Browne will be hardly noticeable, relegated to the sideline. Just a reminder that for every Cinderella story, there’s a hard-luck loser — ask the Indians, or ask Max Browne.Eric He is a sophomore majoring in journalism. He is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. His column, “Grinding Gears,” runs Fridays.last_img read more