The third cycle of certification of professionals in congress tourism is starting


first_imgOne of the strategic goals of the Croatian Association of Congress Tourism Professionals (HUPKT), a leading professional association of congress and business tourism, is to raise the professional standards of congress tourism through education, training and personal development. It was on this track last year that HUPKT conceived and conducted its own certification program called CCMEP (Certified Croatian Meetings and Events Professional) and so in two certification cycle Croatia received a total of 58 certified professionals in congress tourism. Certification brings additional competitiveness and a certain guarantee to customers that their service provider is a professional, who approaches each project according to the rules of the profession. Only natural persons, participants from the congress-incentive-event industry, with a minimum of two years of experience in the MICE sector can apply for certification. The certificate is valid for five years, after which recertification is done based on the collected educational points, by participating in educational events organized by HUPKT.The third cycle of certification of professionals in congress tourism is startingHUPKT will organize certification for the third time this winter, the first round of 5-6. December 2017, and the second round in late January 2018. HUPKT invites all interested colleagues from the congress-incentive-event industry to express their interest in the program by email (info@cmpa.eu) in order to be able to obtain application forms and the Certification Ordinance. “We are extremely satisfied with the first two cycles because the response was very good, so 58 people were certified as professionals in congress tourism. This is extremely important for our industry, especially for clients from abroad. They recognize and appreciate certification because it has been normal for them for years. The certificate itself makes it known that these are people who have experience in the profession and work according to the rules of the profession, while giving clients the assurance that they have found a quality partner and a guarantee that their service provider is a professional. “Points out Ranko Filipović, president of the Croatian Association of Congress Tourism ProfessionalsThe CCMEP certificate has been recognized and accepted by the Faculty of Economics in Zagreb – Department of Tourism, Croatian Chamber of Commerce – Sector for Tourism and the European Federation of Congress Organizers – EFAPCO. HUPKT is also the Preferred Provider for the Events Industry Council (EIC) which has recognized the value of the program and awarded it certification points, and collecting points is one of the steps towards CMP certification.last_img read more

Student chosen for LA Health Commission


first_imgCrane worked with USG Sen. Jillian Halperin, a junior majoring in communication, and other senators to create the Bystander Intervention Training Program, a project that requires at least one executive board member of every registered student organization to undergo training to learn how to intervene in unsafe situations. “[I] saw a lot of problems with how education and public health was tackled by the campus,” Crane said. “I saw victims of sexual assault from my work [with EMS], and I saw issues of homelessness around USC with the Red Cross. I thought, ‘There’s got to be a better way to do this.’” “I think this is going to be an extension of who he has been as an intern — very forward-thinking, anticipatory, coming up with new ideas, always willing to take that extra step,” Vick said. Crane said his experience as a pre-med student, speaker pro tempore in Undergraduate Student Government, director of Emergency Medical Services at USC and president of the American Red Cross chapter at USC motivated him to approach medicine from the perspective of social advocacy. “I’m really happy that he took the initiative to ask,” Vick said. “I did not have a formal intern application … he just asked for the opportunity and we figured it out.” Crane said he has a lot to learn from the veterans in his commission and is excited to implement concrete policies that will benefit the community. “We provide policy recommendations on everything, from evaluating existing projects to proposing new ideas — trying to stem public health issues where they start,” Crane said. “Many of the things deal with social health disparities and advocacy on behalf of people who might not have as much of a voice in city council.” Crane will work with the commission over the summer until October, and in Fall 2019, he will attend The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Ever since senior Matthew Crane formed a close bond with a trauma surgeon at a local hospital he worked at, he knew he wanted to be a public health professional. As an intern, Crane was the primary author of the commission’s 2018 annual report, which presented and addressed a wide variety of issues facing the L.A. community, ranging from disease outbreaks to public bathroom availability. Senior Matthew Crane was sworn in as a Los Angeles City District Health Commissioner March 11. Crane, the USG Speaker Pro Tempore is the youngest member to ever be elected to the commission. (Photo from Facebook) “They were my first choice: they’re the No. 1 school for public health,” Crane said. “It was a really great fit at the interview … I’ll be attending there in the fall, pursuing an M.D. and hopefully an M.P.H. [Master of Public Health].” “Making the biggest impact on the community is something that I find personally rewarding,” Crane said. “When you look at really big issues — whether it’s homelessness in Los Angeles or sexual assault at USC — these are things that really need to be targeted with policies … that are wide-reaching. I think that public health is the way that you … solve those problems.” The Los Angeles City Health Commission’s goals are to evaluate the health needs of the city’s population, determine whether these needs are being met and implement cost-effective policies which address them, according to L.A. County Department of Public Health program director Nicole Vick. Crane was sworn in on March 11, and will represent the 13th district of Los Angeles. After working on the annual report and reading an article about UC Berkeley students being sworn into commissions, Crane said he was motivated to become a member. Vick said she first met Crane when he reached out to her for an internship opportunity after she came to speak at a USC Red Cross chapter meeting in 2017. “There was a recent Typhus outbreak, and right now, that’s a big focus for the city health commission,” Crane said. “We’re drafting a letter to the mayor regarding pest-resistant trash bins and having those made available in Skid Row.” Crane said that he often notices parallels between his work experience as a student and his current position as health commissioner, since they both entail serving and advocating for the well-being of specific communities. “The report establishes background for a lot of different areas of improvement within Los Angeles — things like sobering centers and public bathroom availability,” Crane said. “It provides a summary of where the issue is at right now, and then it provides policy recommendations.” Now, the human biology major and Undergraduate Student Government Speaker Pro Tempore has become the youngest person ever elected as a Los Angeles City Health Commission. “There were a few vacancies in the health commission,” Crane said. “I thought, ‘I’ll toss my resume in,’ and I got picked.” “He … chaired [the project] and was really helpful in coordinating with so many different campus partners in making sure that we could get the project funded,” Halperin said. “We really couldn’t have done that without him.” The commission and Crane are currently focused on drafting a resolution — set to be published next month — concerning health issues impacting citizens on Skid Row. Vick said she has no doubt that Crane will continue to pursue public health advocacy as a commission member with the same passion and drive he had as an intern. “I thought what [the trauma surgeon] did was really interesting,” Crane said. “I saw how he took care of the whole community … I thought, ‘That’s what I want to do.’” “There’s a lot of adults very experienced in politics [in the commission], and I’m just trying to catch up and learn what political advocacy looks like at that level,” Crane said. Halperin said she’s excited for the next chapter in Crane’s life. “Whatever he puts his mind to, he’s just going to succeed,” Halperin said. “I can’t believe he’s graduating and moving on, but he’s truly an incredible person and an incredible colleague.”last_img read more

Recruiting stars don’t always align right


first_imgRecruiting is the lifeblood of every college football program.With national signing day coming up Wednesday, prepare to hear the recruiting news spewing across every sports media platform.You’ll hear which team has the best incoming class, which teams missed out, which teams did the best at what positions and so on.Your appetite for arbitrary rankings — a specialty of college football — will be satisfied.You’ll hear who Rivals.com says got the top class and who landed the most of ESPNU’s top 150 players.You’ll be seeing stars, likely three, four and five at a time.My advice: Do not get too excited one way or the other.In fact, you would be better off dismissing the ridiculous rundowns of rankings as soon as you hear them.Everyone will tell you recruiting is inexact, especially in football.In sports like basketball, where one individual can have a much greater impact, the odds are much better. Kids sometimes start getting recruited as early as middle school.If a basketball player has the size and the skill set, chances are he’ll pan out at whichever college he chooses (and then, of course, jump ship to the NBA after one season).Or, at least, there’s a greater chance the basketball player will pan out than a football recruit who seems to have the same level of qualifications; so many factors always weigh in.There is greater competition for playing time, which usually means a longer delay before seeing action. Plus, football is so much more of a physical game that top recruits sometimes either cannot keep up or are derailed by injuries.These recruiting misses are not limited to one sport.But they don’t seem to stick out as much in other sports as in college football, primarily because of the frenzy that accompanies each recruiting cycle.Hindsight will always reveal each year’s booms and busts. ESPN.com just took a rear-view mirror look at the class of 2007 and, not surprisingly, the discrepancy between the rankings then and how the players actually panned out is huge.USC landed 10 of ESPNU’s 150, which gave the Trojans the honor of being named the top recruiting class that year.Then-coach Pete Carroll landed the top three prospects in the nation: running back Joe McKnight (No. 1), linebacker Chris Galippo (No. 2) and running back Marc Tyler (No. 3). The class also included quarterback Aaron Corp (No. 33) and receiver Ronald Johnson (No. 47).In 2007, you would have thought that by grabbing the two top running backs and the top linebacker, the Trojans would be primed for greatness on both sides of the ball by now.But you never know which way the football will bounce.McKnight was a solid presence in USC’s backfield, yet despite his ability, he never emerged as a game-changing player.The New York Jets selected him in the fourth round in last year’s draft, but his USC career ended far below expectations.Galippo struggled with injuries early in his career, then was a Butkus Award semifinalist in 2009 before losing his starting spot for part of 2010 and finishing the season with 29 tackles.Galippo could still redeem himself with a breakout season in 2011.Tyler came into USC with a broken ankle and then battled more injuries, but he is coming off his best and most complete season.As a result, he could be set for a big 2011, when he will almost certainly be the featured running back.Then there’s Corp, formerly known as the fifth-best quarterback recruit in the country.He lost the starting job to then-freshman Matt Barkley, had an awful performance in his only start of the year and then ingloriously transferred to Richmond.Meanwhile, Cam Newton, who began his career at Florida, was ranked No. 58 by ESPNU.Sure, it took him a few transfers and a little fatherly direction to land at Auburn, but you can’t argue with a Heisman trophy and a national title.You get the point by now.No matter what hype a kid brings to his college campus, there is no guarantee he’ll pan out on the field.Forty-yard dash times and high school touchdown totals lead to scholarships, but they don’t necessarily amount to success.That being said, USC’s prospective recruiting class is currently ranked No. 5 in the nation by Rivals.com, No. 6 by Scout.com and No. 4 by ESPN. And the Trojans’ class includes eight ESPNU150 signees.Book me a seat at the 2013 BCS National Championship!“Middle Ground” runs Tuesdays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Josh at jjovanel@usc.edu.last_img read more