New EPA proposal not likely to end disputes over new gas pipeline projects, experts say


first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Even as industry welcomes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s latest proposal aimed at preventing states from blocking infrastructure projects, experts say that the policy is unlikely to give gas pipelines the boost they want.The Aug. 9 rule-making proposal — the latest volley in a battle between states and the Trump administration over lengthy delays to gas projects — would limit state’s authority under the Clean Water Act to block pipeline construction if a project does not meet state standards. However, while the policy would likely shake up federal-state dynamics on infrastructure projects and appears destined for lengthy court battles, the proposed EPA rule is unlikely to prevent states from denying pipeline developers critical water quality permits, several lawyers and energy analysts said.“There is a plausible case to be made that this decision and that this proposed rule is more of a victory for style over substance in terms of being able to effectively rebut recalcitrant state governments that are not interested in permitting new natural gas pipeline,” said Rob Rains, an energy industry analyst at Washington Analysis LLC.The rule could make it incrementally easier for developers to sue states over unfavorable decisions on Section 401 applications, but it would not cut state politics out of the review process, said Katie Bays, an energy analyst and co-founder of research and consulting firm Sandhill Strategy.“Superficially, you would say that more favorable guidance from the EPA strengthens the legal position of pipeline projects and LNG projects that have struggled to obtain 401 certificates from states…That’s the hope and that’s what the administration is attempting to do here,” Bays said. “However, because the guidance does not remove the ability of the states to reject an application for a water quality certificate, they can still do that.”Rains, too, said the scope of what the EPA can accomplish through regulation will remain limited, particularly if Congress is unwilling to change the underlying law. “Yes, the EPA can initiate this rulemaking. They can tighten up these requirements,” he said. “But there is already this prevailing dynamic where the states get a say in this. If Massachusetts or New Jersey or New York or whomever — Virginia — don’t want a project going through, then they have tools at their disposal. It’s not too complicated.”More ($): Stalled gas pipeline projects unlikely to get relief under EPA rule, experts say New EPA proposal not likely to end disputes over new gas pipeline projects, experts saylast_img read more

CCU seeks revenge on Ga. Southern


first_img Associated Press February 12, 2020 STEPPING UP: Georgia Southern’s Ike Smith has averaged 14.9 points and 5.9 rebounds while Quan Jackson has put up 13 points, 4.4 rebounds and 2.6 steals. For the Chanticleers, DeVante’ Jones has averaged 16.3 points, 5.3 rebounds and 5.5 assists while Tommy Burton has put up 11.4 points and 7.2 rebounds.FUELING THE OFFENSE: Jones has either made or assisted on 42 percent of all Coastal Carolina field goals over the last five games. The sophomore guard has 33 field goals and 20 assists in those games.WINLESS WHEN: Coastal Carolina is 0-9 when scoring fewer than 68 points and 13-3 when scoring at least 68.UNDEFEATED WHEN: The Eagles are 10-0 when they hold opposing teams to 70 points or fewer and 5-10 when opponents exceed 70 points. The Chanticleers are 5-0 when turning the ball over 11 times or fewer and 8-12 when the team exceeds that total.DID YOU KNOW: Georgia Southern has made 8.7 3-pointers per game this season, which is most among Sun Belt teams. CCU seeks revenge on Ga. Southerncenter_img ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditCoastal Carolina (13-12, 6-8) vs. Georgia Southern (15-10, 9-5)W.S. Hanner Fieldhouse, Statesboro, Georgia; Thursday, 7 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Coastal Carolina seeks revenge on Georgia Southern after dropping the first matchup in Conway. The teams last went at it on Jan. 2, when Coastal Carolina made only five 3-pointers on 21 attempts while the Eagles went 15 for 38 behind the arc on the way to a three-point victory.last_img read more

Getting going, at a snail’s pace


first_imgI watched the creature slither for a minute. “I don’t know.” I shrugged at Alex. “Maybe he’s going to his mommy.” I stopped and squatted down next to my son. Two observers of the creature’s arduous journey. “Maybe.” Alex reached over and picked up the snail between finger and thumb. Its slimy body wiggled as my son placed it in his palm and pushed it towards me. I studied the lines on the brown shell, the spiraling antennae, the fluid movement of the head and trunk. I guess, in its own funny way, the snail really was pretty. “Shall we help it go home?” I suggested. Alex smiled broadly. “He misses his mommy.” “OK.” I gingerly picked up the snail from my son’s palm and, holding it at arm’s length by the shell, I ambled over to an unplanted section of our backyard garden. Alex followed and together we placed the snail down gently on the soft dirt. “Good-bye, Mr. Snail,” I said, as I brushed off my hands with a flourish. “Bye-bye.” My son aptly mimicked my gesture. I couldn’t hide a smile. Holding hands, we started back slowly toward the car. “Is he going to find his mommy?” Alex’s voice had a tinge of worry. “Yes. His mommy’s waiting for him and loves him very much.” I picked Alex up and gave him a big hug, then carried him half-upside down on a zigzag path down our driveway to the accompaniment of his giggles. Once on the road, I finally checked my watch. After dropping Alex off, I’d have just enough time to make it to the office. I might even have to hurry so I wouldn’t be late. I looked in the rearview mirror and waved at my smiling son. Yes, I’d have to hurry. But not until after Alex and I had enjoyed our drive to day care. Everything else would just have to wait. Linda Reid Chassiakos, M.D., director of the Klotz Student Health Center at California State University, Northridge, is a mom who is still trying to find the right balance between work and home.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! I had almost made it to the car. I looked behind me – Alex was nowhere to be found. Retracing my steps back to the house, I finally saw him, crouched on the patio, intently gazing at the tiles. “Come on, Alex,” I shouted, the words sounding absurd even to my ears. “We’re going to be late for day care!” I wasn’t due at the office for an hour at least. “Mommy, look!” My 3-year-old looked up and smiled as I walked towards him. “See?” I looked where his tiny finger was pointing. Centered on one of the tiles was a very ugly brown snail. Alex had turned back and focused his eyes on the creature, which was undulating across our patio, millimeter by millimeter. “A snail!” Alex said excitedly. “Come on, Alex, we have to go.” I was getting desperate to finish my mothering duties for the morning, after having rushed to get my two other children ready for the school bus in the nick of time. My day planner was filled with important chores, and I had even hoped to have some extra time at work to clear off some projects from my desk before deadline. Alex was oblivious. “He’s pretty,” was the only reply. I resisted the urge to shiver. Snakes and snails and puppy dogs’ tails … “Where’s he going?” Alex asked. last_img read more