Australian grocer Coles expands renewable energy commitment, signs major solar PPA


first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Construction of three large-scale solar farms proposed for regional New South Wales could be underway as early as next month, after a landmark deal between Australian supermarket giant Coles and UK-based renewables developer Metka EGN.The 10-year deal – claimed as a first for a major Australian retailer – will see Coles purchase more than 70 per cent of the more than 220 gigawatt hours of electricity that will be generated by the three PV plants, which will be built and operated by Metka near Wagga Wagga, Corowa and Junee.This would be enough to meet around 10 per cent of the retailer’s electricity needs, a statement said, and would add to the commercial solar already installed on 30 Coles outlets, and to plans to install rooftop PV on a further 38 stores this financial year.The three solar farms at the centre of the deal, totaling 260MW in capacity, were originally developed by Terrain Solar – the company behind the under-construction Warwick Solar Farm, now owned by and set to supply the University of Queensland – and were acquired by Metka earlier this year.Terrain chairman David Griffin said the deal struck between Metka and Coles meant that construction of the solar farms would go ahead in September, and all three projects could be finished and supplying power to the grid by July 2020.The three NSW solar farms, meanwhile, are the latest in Australia to be built off the back of corporate power purchase agreements, as big businesses and energy users turn to large-scale renewables to cut costs and bolster their sustainability. Notable corporate PPAs of the recent past have included Australian steel giant BlueScope agreeing to buy the bulk of the output from the Finley Solar Farm, which has just started sending power to the grid in NSW. And in March last year, brewing giant CUB signed a 12-year power purchase agreement with BayWa to buy just under half of the output of the 112MW Karadoc solar farm in Victoria, completed late last year by German company BayWa – accounting for nearly 90 per cent of CUB’s total electricity needs.More: Landmark deal to power Coles underpins three NSW solar farms Australian grocer Coles expands renewable energy commitment, signs major solar PPAlast_img read more

Operation Ostium Reduces Illegal Air Traffic on Brazil’s Borders


first_imgBy Taciana Moury/Diálogo August 08, 2017 Operation Ostium, conducted by the Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym) since March, has reduced suspect air traffic on Brazil’s borders with Bolivia and Paraguay by 80 percent. The operation has reinforced surveillance of the region’s air space with the temporary installation of mobile radar stations in towns near border areas such as Chapecó in Santa Catarina, and Corumbá in Mato Grosso do Sul. Aerial operations from FAB bases have also been enhanced, and military aircraft have been deployed to towns and cities such as Cascavel and Foz do Iguaçu in Paraná, and Dourados in Mato Grosso do Sul, the main base of operations, located 100 kilometers from Paraguay’s border. At the beginning of July, during a visit to the town of Vilhena in Rondônia (northern Brazil), Minister of Defense Raul Jungmann told the press that Ostium had mobilized 800 military personnel and more than 30 aircraft. A-29 Super Tucano fighter aircraft, E-99 airborne early warning and control aircraft, and R-35A and RA-1 reconnaissance aircraft, as well as AH-2 Sabre and H-60 Black Hawk combat helicopters, among other models, are being deployed in this operation. The operation is coordinated by the Airspace Operations Command (COMAE, per its Portuguese acronym), located in Brasília. Monitoring also involves the TPS-B34 radar system, capable of 360-degree scanning, and of tracking several targets simultaneously. FAB considers Ostium to be one of its most important operations against illegal aerial activity in the border regions. According to the Air Force Social Communications Center (CECOMSAER, per its Portuguese acronym), 150 suspect aircraft have been intercepted since the operation began on March 24th. General Gerson Nogueira Machado de Oliveira, the commander of the FAB Airspace Operations Command, explained that Ostium is intensifying control of the airspace in the border regions. “This operation is part of the federal government’s Integrated Border Protection Program under which the Air Force is responsible for controlling national airspace. This is an interagency initiative, mainly in conjunction with the Federal Police. We have an intelligence database which we use to monitor a number of aircraft in Brazilian airspace,” he said. Intercepting unlawful aircraft One such interception took place on June 25th. A FAB A-29 Super Tucano forced a twin-engine aircraft to land in the region of Aragarças, Goiás in the midwestern region of Brazil. The aircraft, carrying 500 kilograms of cocaine, defied all orders to land. On this occasion, the pilots of the fighter fired “warning shots,” as dictated by the protocol for airspace policing measures, pursuant to the Aerial Detention Law. According to information from the Air Force Press Agency, warning shots were required after two route-modification orders went unheeded. The intention is not to hit the suspect aircraft but to demonstrate the fighter’s firepower and enforce standards. FAB also used the E-99 airborne early warning and control aircraft to aid in detecting and intercepting the twin-engine aircraft, as well as intelligence work in conjunction with the Federal Police. Aerial Detention Law Since the decree was signed in 2004, FAB has intercepted more than 2,000 suspect aircraft in Brazilian airspace. According to Gen. Machado, interception is part of the air force’s daily activities. The law stipulates that before being classified as hostile and therefore subject to forced detention measures, aircraft will be considered suspect if they enter Brazilian airspace without an approved flight plan, coming from regions that are known to be sources of production or distribution of narcotics. Another situation is when aircraft omit information necessary for air traffic control authorities to identify them, or if they fail to comply with orders from the latter, especially when on a route presumably used for the distribution of narcotics. The four phases of interception The Aerial Detention Law stipulates four phases of interception: verification, intervention, persuasion, and detention. “FAB conducts coercive measures in a progressive manner, whenever a measure is not heeded and the target is considered hostile, stronger measures will be implemented, up to forced detention of the suspect aircraft,” CECOMSAER explained to Diálogo. Once called in by COMAE, FAB interceptors can undertake verification measures, which involve, among other things, long-distance identification, confirmation of the aircraft registration, and crew interrogation via the international emergency channel, as well as visual signs, according to internationally established rules for the mandatory identification of all aircraft. If the pilot of a suspect aircraft fails to respond properly, intervention measures will be employed. In this case, according to CECOMSAER, suspect aircraft are obliged to change their routes or to land. If these orders are not obeyed, the fighter pilot moves to the persuasion phase, where warning shots may be fired, as was the case involving the twin-engine aircraft in June. The last phase of the interception procedure occurs when the aircraft is considered hostile. In this case, shots are fired to damage the suspect aircraft, a process that must follow a strict protocol. According to FAB, all radar and aircraft involved in interception must be under Brazilian Air Defense authority control, and the entire operation must be recorded in audio or video. Furthermore, interceptions may only be conducted by qualified pilots and air defense controllers, according to standards set forth by COMAE. The procedure has to be conducted over sparsely populated areas that are related to routes presumably used for drug trafficking.last_img read more

DILG to charge ex-lawmaker, 6 others for ‘unauthorized’ relief ops


first_imgHe added that the vehicle used anunauthorized food pass and that the team namedropped Casilao to get pastcheckpoints before they were accosted. DILG Undersecretary Jonathan Malaya saidCasilao violated provisions of the Bayanihan to Heal as One law on strictstay-at-home protocols for residents of Luzon. “We don’t give special treatmenteven if you have a congressman with you. We will sue all violators,” theDILG official added. Malaya claimed the jeepney that ferriedthe group and the goods also carried tarpaulins, pamphlets and other“propaganda materials,” which were confiscated. The DILG identified the volunteers asKarl Mae San Juan, Marlon Lester Gueta, Robero Medel, Eriberto Peña Jr., RaymarGuaves, and Tobi Estrada.  The relief goods were eventuallydistributed to the intended recipients in Barangay Bigte in Norzagaray, Bulacanafter they were turned over to local authorities. According to Malaya, the gesture ofCasilao’s team was an “unauthorized travel outside of Metro Manila,”and an alleged to organize a mass gathering in the community in the guise ofdistributing relief goods. “We wish to remind Anakpawis thatthe virus cannot spread by itself,” Malaya said. “It has no legs. Itis people that spread the virus. You give us no choice but to file chargesagainst you.” They will be charged for violatingprovisions of the Bayanihan law, among them for non-cooperation and resistanceand disobedience to a person of authority, while Casilao will face raps forusurpation of authority./PN MANILA – The Department of Interior andLocal Government (DILG) will file charges against former Anakpawis Party-list Rep.Ariel Casilao and six volunteers for violating quarantine rules when theydistribute relief goods in Norzagaray, Bulacan on Sunday. Casilao and his team of volunteers fromTulong Anakpawis and Sagip Kanayunan were blocked and apprehended by cops onSunday morning but were not informed of their violations.last_img read more

Klose: Africa will win World Cup with more slots


first_imgLegendary Germany striker legend Miroslav Klose says an African country will win the FIFA World Cup if the continent has more slots like their European counterparts.Africa are allocated five out of the 32 slots while World Cup power houses Europe and South America have 13 and five slots respectively.While five countries from Europe have won the World Cup  (England, France, Germany, Italy, Spain) three from South America (Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay) have tasted glory on football’s biggest stage.The farthest African teams have been at the World Cup is the quarter-final  (Cameroon, Senegal, Ghana).Co-host of the 2002 World Cup South Korea is the only Asian country that has gotten to the semi-final.And according to Klose, the 2014 World Cup who is also the tournament’s all time leading goalscorer, posited that the five slots allocated to Africa limits the continent’s chances of winning it.“There is no way Africa can win the World cup, unless FIFA brings balance to the number of teams that qualifies to the World cup,” the former Bayern Munich striker said, as cited by Soccer Scenes Africa.“For now it is advantage to Europe and South America. The slot for African teams is very bad. Only five teams in a world cup that has almost 13 European teams. If Black lives really matter, we should show it by actions in every institution not only by kneeling down.“We need to balance everything, no one must be considered superior than the other. Despite all the talent they have, but it would be absolutely impossible to go all the way to reach the World cup final with only five teams in the tournament, meanwhile other continents have more than five,” he added.last_img read more