Teen star Billy Gilmour backed to shine by Chelsea’s Barkley


first_img Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do8 Shows That Went From “Funny” To “Why Am I Watching This”6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeLil Nas X’s Hit Song Is Becoming The Longest #1 Song EverHidden For A Thousand Years – A Secret Of The Great Wall Of China7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty PennyThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them “With injuries it gives opportunities for other lads to take and the manager is willing to put lads in. If you deserve the chance and play well you get in the team.” He said Gilmour impressed every day in training. Ross Barkley has praised teenage midfielder Billy Gilmour after his sparkling performance in Chelsea’s 2-0 FA Cup win against Liverpool. Chelsea midfielder Billy Gilmour impressed against Liverpool The 18-year-old Scot belied his rookie status to boss Tuesday’s fifth-round victory over the Premier League champions-elect, deservedly winning the man-of-the-match award. He mopped up in defence, set up attacks and even nutmegged Brazil midfielder Fabinho in a virtuoso coming-of-age performance at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea boss Frank Lampard said he had absolute trust in Gilmour, describing him as “huge in talent”. The club’s injury crisis could pave the way for the youngster’s full Premier League debut against Everton this weekend. Barkley has offered a ringing endorsement of the former Rangers youth star. “Billy was ready for his chance against Liverpool and he took it,” he said.Advertisement Read Also: Chelsea face uncertainty over Abraham injury “For a young lad he is really mature with his ability on the ball, he makes the right decision most of the time,” he said. “He is similar to Jorginho. He is a quality player and a good addition to the squad. “He recently moved into the first-team changing room with us and he’s settled in really well and long may it continue. He is always asking questions as well, which is a sign of a player that wants to improve and do well for the club.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more

Full-time SRO coming to BCSC next year


first_imgBatesville, Ind. — The Batesville Community School Corporation will add a full-time school resource officer for the 2017-18 school year.Superintendent Paul Ketcham says the position will not only enforce rules and provide security but will also serve as a mentor, role model and counselor for students, faculty and parents.School board members unanimously approved the job description at the most recent meeting.The position will be funded with matching grant dollars from the Department of Homeland Security.Schools in Flint, Michigan established the first school resource officer program in 1953.last_img read more

Professor uses Afro-Latina identity to foster community at Price school, South LA


first_imgAdjunct professor La Mikia Castillo said it can be hard to find a space where she “fits in,” due to her Afro-Latina identity. Castillo works to bridge her two communities, since she thinks members of both face similar issues. (Sarah Johnson| Daily Trojan)Born and raised in South L.A., alumna and adjunct professor La Mikia Castillo strives to make a difference in communities in need by focusing on public policy and urban planning.“I grew up in a low-income community,” Castillo said. “It wasn’t until that I got to college when I realized that my community didn’t have access to the same resources as other communities.”Castillo received her bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego, where she said she noticed a stark contrast in access to resources among her peers.“When I began to see the disparities between what I had access to and what my friends from home had access to versus my peers in college, I realized that there was something wrong there and I wanted to change it,” she said. In college, Castillo learned that communities looked the way they do due to policies implemented by policymakers and urban planners, who decide which areas certain populations will be placed in. “I became a community organizer because I really wanted to work on organizing community members to learn what I had learned in college and use that information to change the community, to actually advocate for policies that would be positive for us,” Castillo said.As a graduate student at the Price School of Public Policy, Castillo founded the Black Student Association at Price after noticing that there was a need for black students to speak about issues that impact the black community. In addition, she was a board member of the Latino Student Association at Price.“[These groups] were very meaningful for me because as a person who identifies as black and Latina, sometimes it’s hard to find the space where I feel like I fit in, where I can be my whole self,” Castillo said. “I’ve always been involved in black student organizations and Latinx student organizations and then act as a bridge between them because I think that issues our communities face are so similar, that it makes sense for us to overlap and work together to address them through policy and planning,” Castillo recently worked as a national director at the National Foster Institute, where she worked on local, state and federal child welfare policies. She also helped empower foster youth by helping them understand how policy is created.  “I would bring foster youth from across the country to Washington D.C. to meet with their Congress members,” Castillo said. “They would shadow them to learn about how Congress works, and they would then tell their own personal stories about what their experiences were like in the foster care system … They would also make recommendations for how they can address those challenges through policy.” Currently, Castillo teaches both of Price’s undergraduate social innovation and graduate social context courses at Price. In both classes, Castillo allows students to work together to solve challenges through social innovations and hands-on activities. “I know that there’s so much for [students] to contribute to the class, so if you would like to lead a session in the class, I want you to take the lead on that,” Castillo said. “I absolutely love when students take that opportunity to lead, and I think it helps them feel empowered that you have something to bring and something to offer, and your peers can learn from you as well.”This story is part of a mini-series highlighting Latinos at USC. It ran every week during Hispanic Heritage Month, which ended Oct. 15.last_img read more