Expanded Panama Canal Tops Expectations


first_imgzoom On its way to further position Panama as the logistics hub of the Americas, the Expanded Panama Canal has set a number of records and surpassed expectations in its first year of operations, resulting in redrawn global trade routes.Over the past 12 months from its inauguration date of June 26, the Expanded Canal’s performance “has exceeded nearly all expectations.”During the period, more than 1,500 Neopanamax vessels transited the new locks, according to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP).Containerships represent some 46.8 percent of traffic through the waterway, followed by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) carriers and liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers, which represent around 34.2 and 9.4 percent, respectively. Other segments such as bulk carriers, tankers, car carriers, and passenger vessels have also transited the new locks.Additionally, Panama Canal’s tonnage has increased by 22.2 percent when comparing the 2016 and 2017 fiscal year. On average, 5.9 vessels transit the Expanded Canal per day, surpassing original forecasts of two to three daily transits for the first year of operation.Fifteen new liner services opted to transit the Expanded Locks, “as shipping lines continue to reroute their services to take advantage of the economies of scale offered by the Expanded Canal.”The one-year anniversary of the canal’s inauguration, one of the most significant milestones in the history of the 102-year old waterway and a defining moment for the people of Panama and the broader maritime industry, will be commemorated on June 26, 2017.All vessels transiting on Monday will receive a commemorative first anniversary plaque, the ACP informed.last_img read more

Seago Lines New Feeder in Maiden Call to St Petersburg


first_imgShort-sea and feeder operator Seago Line, a part of Maersk Group, has introduced a new vessels, the Vistula Maersk, to its North Europe feeder link between Rotterdam, Netherlands and St. Petersburg, Russia.The recently-delivered Vistula Maersk, which is the first in a series of vessels purpose-built to serve the North Sea and Baltic Sea, made a maiden call to Petrolesport and First Container Terminal (FCT) in St. Petersburg on April 20.In the Russian Baltics, where harsh winters and icy waters pose challenges for container shipping, ice-class vessels “bring a very important value proposition to the market.”Vistula will shortly be joined by its sister unit Volga Maersk and these vessels will together be the only two to operate on the North Europe Feeder Link 1 service.During the coming months, five other sisters, namely Vayenga Maersk, Venta Maersk, Vuoksi Maersk, Vilnia Maersk and the last one still to be announced, will join Vistula and Volga in enhancing a number of Seago Line services in the North Sea and Baltic Sea.Seago Line informed that the new ships are the world’s largest ice-class container vessels, designed specifically for operation in winter conditions and temperatures pof down to -25 degrees C. Apart from their stronger hull, they are characterised by high refrigerated cargo intake.Vistula Maersk and Volga Maersk will operate on Seago Line’s L16/L01 service, which calls Rotterdam’s APM Terminals 1, Delta Container Terminal and APM Terminals Maasvlakte 2, before calling Port of Ust-Luga and then Petrolesport and First Container Terminal in St. Petersburg.Image Courtesy: Seago Linelast_img read more