Planning early is a key to effective on-farm research


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field LeaderMost Ohio farmers will agree that 2019 will go down in the history books as a year with tremendous variability. For those who conduct on-farm research, variability is one thing they attempt to reduce. One way to help reduce variability is to have a plan before you go to the field. A plan that is designed to have multiple replications of the various components can give you options.“If you have a plan, you will be more likely to implement it when you go to the field,” said Elizabeth Hawkins, OSU Extension, Agronomic Systems Field Specialist. “If changes need to be made due to changing conditions, you will be more likely to have options available that allow you to maintain the integrity of the research and not compromise the reliability of the results.”Elizabeth Hawkins, OSU Extension Agronomic Systems Field SpecialistHawkins feels that learning what works in different years is critical.“I am excited about the 2019 research, and the potential of what we can learn in what may become a new normal with the changing environmental conditions,” she said.Challenging conditions can result in very useful data with the proper plan.“As our weather variability continues into the future, data in unique years can be even more valuable as we can compare it to similar challenging years. This will be more true as heavy, infrequent, unpredictable weather events continue,” said Eric Richer, OSU Extension educator in Fulton County. “Even if farmers are doing on-farm research for their own purposes, the more replications they have planned, the better the results will be. I tell farmers there should be a minimum of four replications, and actually recommend six replications if possible so that if a couple are compromised, there are still a sufficient number available to gather the data from.”In some cases, there is value in “data cleaning” when doing the final analysis.“If you start your on-farm research plan with a randomized complete block design, it allows for weather occurrences and other unforeseen factors. Exceptions can be made when data cleaning and those exceptions can be thrown out,” Richer said.Factors that can compromise the on-farm research include everything from planter or sprayer mechanical error, to intense weather events, to yield monitor calibration issues, to unknown field or plot physical factors such as compaction zones.“Compaction is a huge issue this year,” Hawkins said. “Precision U will have a session on Jan. 8, 2020 focusing specifically on mitigating the compaction issue.”Precision U is a program hosted by The Ohio State University and the Digital Ag Team to help farmers make better management decisions. This specific program will help those in attendance learn how to minimize compaction and maximize soil productivity.One tip that Hawkins gives all farmers, regardless of the level of research they are conducting is to calibrate their equipment.“Accurately calibrating equipment is very important in reducing variability,” she said. “Farmers need to calibrate for the different scenarios they may encounter.”Taking good notes throughout the season is also important.“Making notes of any replant that had to be done, or marking any drowned-out spots, noting patterns observed during harvest, anything that a farmer observes that stands out will be useful when cleaning-up the data,” she said. “Often the replants and drowned out spots can be ‘clipped-out’ to prevent bias in the data.”Hawkins reminds farmers that the OSU Extension Digital Ag Team and County agriculture educators are available and willing to help both in planning on-farm research trials prior to when the season begins, and also can help make suggestions to clean up the data once harvest is complete.last_img read more

Cheteshwar Pujara’s family welcomes him with a cake after record-breaking Australia tour


first_imgCheteshwar Pujara’s family made special arrangements for the cricketer’s return to Rajkot after a gruelling tour of Australia.Pujara came back home from Sydney after a ground-breaking Border-Gavaskar series which India won 2-1 to retain the trophy.He was the chief architect of India’s Test wins in Adelaide and Melbourne along with the fast bowlers and he made sure to end the series with a bang as he smashed 193 in the drawn Sydney Test.On Friday, Pujara was welcomed back by his family as he cut a cake to celebrate a successful tour Down Under.The 31-year-old posted a couple of pictures on his Instagram with his wife, daughter and parents.”Happiness is only real, when shared #FridayFeeling,” Pujara captioned the post.Pujara’s performance in Australia caught the attention of the cricketing world as he amassed 521 runs in the series with three hundreds at an average of over 74 and walked away with the man-of-the-series award.Such was Pujara’s tenacity that the Australian bowlers had no response to his concentration, defence and just absolute defiance. Australia coach Justin Langer even went on say that he had not seen anyone concentrate better than Pujara not even Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid.”He proved that you don’t have to be a Flash Harry to be successful. In this day and age when the bowlers are smart, with analysts studying your weaknesses, bowling attacks being more accurate… you have to earn your runs,” head coach Ravi Shastri told India Today’s Boria Majumdar in an exclusive interview.advertisementWith India’s Test assignments over for the season, the soft-spoken family man is now gearing up for his return to domestic cricket and is also looking forward to another stint in county cricket.”I’ll be playing some first-class cricket back home. During IPL, I might be playing county cricket. Next Test series is 6-7 months away. Will give me enough time to prepare. I’ll work hard on my game to play white-ball cricket. But Test cricket is my priority, it’ll always remain my priority,” Pujara had said after the Sydney Test.Also Read | Love watching Pujara bat, there’s a lot to learn from him: Shubman GillAlso Read | Best Indian side I have been part of, says Cheteshwar Pujara after series-winning 521 runsAlso Read | Cheteshwar Pujara just can’t dance: Watch India stars celebrate historic winAlso Read | Pujara frustrated top-class Aussie attack to the point of submission: Ian Chappelllast_img read more