Wilshere takes some time away


first_imgArsenal manager Arsene Wenger revealed midfielder Jack Wilshere had taken some time away after he was ruled out for at least six weeks with a foot injury suffered on international duty with England. It is understood the fracture was so minuscule that the scanning equipment within Wembley failed to detect the issue following a precautionary examination by England’s medical staff, and i t was only when Arsenal, via an independent radiologist, conducted a more detailed test of the injured area that the real problem became more apparent. Although Wilshere’s place in the World Cup squad – a provisional 30-man party set to be named on May 13 – does not look initially in any serious jeopardy, the midfielder is nevertheless now set to miss at least eight club fixtures – starting with Saturday’s FA Cup quarter-final against Everton and then next week’s second leg of the Champions League last-16 tie away to Bayern Munich. Wenger said at a press conference on Friday morning: “I believe it (tackle) was accidental. Jack will be out for six weeks. “It is a blow for him and for us, from now on we want to get him to recover and come back as quickly as possible and prepare for next season. “You can only be very down, especially in the first days. “He is in a boot and has gone away for a few days to get away from things and think about something else.” Arsenal remain positive Wilshere will be able to return to play some part in the final few matches – unlike forward Theo Walcott, whose own World Cup dream was shattered by a serious knee injury in January. Although it will be of little comfort, Arsenal will be compensated financially for the injury and the Barclays Premier League club will not have to pay for the midfielder’s wages – reported at around some £100,000-per-week – while he is sidelined, with the money coming from the FA’s insurers. The 22-year-old faces at least six weeks on the sidelines after tests showed he had sustained a hairline fracture in his left foot following a hefty tackle from Liverpool defender Daniel Agger early in Wednesday night’s friendly against Denmark at Wembley. Wilshere played on following treatment until he was replaced on the hour, and afterwards maintained it was “just a bruise” when he spoke to reporters, having been initially assessed by the Football Association. Wenger maintains there was no pre-agreement over how long Wilshere could be played, or how the injury was managed by England. “At some stage it is the player who gives you the indication, you trust always the player,” the Arsenal manager said. “Sometimes you give him a few minutes to tell you how he feels and if he has pain, we cannot make an instant decision with an X-ray, so it is the player who tells you if he can go on or not.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Students express off-campus housing safety concerns


first_img“Part of the scope of this [renovation] project included removing dated security bars from the property and replacing them with a Ring Doorbell and Floodlight camera system on the exterior of the property, giving residents more knowledge and control over who has access to their home when they are not there,” the statement read. In the email screenshot posted to Facebook, Juraso said the property owner was “well aware” of the incident, and “their stance remained firm.” The post was taken off of the page Thursday. Rusher alleged Jurasko reported the post for harassment and it was subsequently deleted. “Security bars are not promised anywhere in the lease and as a property management company, we never imply or promise the safety of our residents,” the email read. “I think the email was hostile and unnecessary for one, just to say that they don’t ensure the safety of residents with … but especially callous, insensitive given the recent incident,” Rusher said. “Even though I don’t know the specific details, I feel like it was understandable for us to request safety measures, especially those that were included when we first signed the lease, such as safety bars.” In addition to a new security system, the housing company said it is installing new fences to replace the original security system. Rusher, who is majoring in international relations global business,  said the email dismissed the safety concerns of Mosaic residents. In the Facebook group, the company’s statement was met with harsh criticism. Rusher’s post accrued over 180 comments from students, many of whom shared similar experiences. The post was removed from the page Thursday. When junior Keala Rusher discovered off-campus property management company Mosaic Student Community wasn’t going to reinstall safety bars on her windows, she had concerns. In the comments, many students wrote that they experienced difficulty with Mosaic’s maintenance of utilities, including the air conditioning, and other residents complained of being forced to live in smaller “closet-like” rooms. Students complained in a USC Facebook group after Mosaic Student Housing removed window safety bars from its houses. (Photo courtesy of Mosaic Student Housing) According to Rusher, the incident began when her housemate, Alejandro Gonzalez, a senior majoring in aerospace engineering, asked for security bars to be replaced on the window after they were taken off for renovations and repairs to the building.center_img In response to the allegations, Mosaic released a statement addressing the renovations and student concerns. DPS Assistant Chief David Carlisle said that students should consider the safety measures in place before deciding to lease with certain off-campus housing companies. Carlisle said checking the location and security amenities of properties can help students feel safer. Students encouraged Rusher to contact the Department of Public Safety with safety concerns and legal counsel for representation. Rusher said that following the recent death of student Victor McElhaney during a robbery attempt near campus, security and well-being became an important concern for her and her housemates. “Mosaic built a small house in the backyard of the house that we are currently leasing and … they re-painted the exterior of our house and in order to do that they had to take off the security bars that were already on the windows,” Rusher said. “They almost moved me into a literal closet-sized room despite the floor plans suggesting otherwise,” one student commented. “Renovations include … [a] repainting the exterior of the home and adding security fencing between the front of the house and the back of the property,” the statement read. She posted a screenshot of the email exchange between her housemate and property manager Courtney Jurasko in the “USC Memes for Spoiled Pre Teens” Facebook group. “If a student feels unsafe, we would be happy to do a quick security assessment of the facility,” Carlisle said. “But, if it is a privately owned properly, the owner has no obligation to conform to what we recommend. But, students can make recommendations.”last_img read more

Tipp ladies score resounding victory


first_imgThey’ve picked up their first win of the Division 3 season in emphatic fashion against Fermanagh.Tipp defeated the Ulster county 6-14 to 0-1 in Bansha.The Premier County led 2-7 to 0-1 at the break.last_img

The A’s will stop paying minor league players; will they become free agents? Nope.


first_imgAccording to Baseball America, as of Friday morning, 15 teams have committed to paying their minor-leaguers the standard stipend of $400 per week — on average, that was a raise for Single-A and Double-A players, and a reduction for Triple-A players — at least through the end of June. Some teams, like the Mariners, Padres and Marlins, have already committed to paying their minor-leaguers through the scheduled end of the season. MORE: David Price pledges $1,000 to Dodgers minor-leaguersIt’s not yet known what the other 14 teams will do, but to this point, the A’s are the only team that has decided not to pay its minor league players. How much is that saving the A’s? Just some rough math. Say there are 200 players in a minor league system. Paying each $400/week for July, July and August is $5,200 per player. To pay every minor leaguer would have cost the Oakland A’s a hair over $1 million.Owner John Fisher is worth an estimated $2 billion.— Jeff Passan (@JeffPassan) May 27, 2020The A’s, as noted by Passan, are owned by John Fisher, who has a reported net worth of $2.1 billion, according to Forbes. He’s the youngest son of Gap founders Doris and Donald Fisher. So when we say it’s a choice, it’s just that. John Fisher’s hand is not being forced. He’s not facing insolvency if he pays his club’s minor-leaguers what they’re owed, or what other teams are paying their minor-league players. He’s just choosing not to pay his minor-leaguers — and others in the organization — anything to save a few bucks while baseball is stopped. Seems like a poor human choice, but it’s not my money and he didn’t ask me how to spend it. The A’s aren’t the only team cutting minor league costs, it also should be noted. This week was a disaster for minor league players, as hundreds of players across the sport were released on Wednesday and Thursday. But here’s a question that immediately came to mind with Oakland’s news: If the A’s are no longer paying their minor-leaguers, shouldn’t those minor-leaguers now be free agents? Logically, that makes sense, and it would be the case for pretty much any other person impacted by the coronavirus. And that’s the case for far too many Americans, as the U.S. unemployment rate hit 14.7 percent in April and is almost certainly higher now. MORE: A’s soil ‘lovable underdog’ image by not paying minor-leaguersI already knew the answer to that question, and I’m sure you do, too. Here’s an email from A’s general manager David Forst to the club’s minor-leaguers. Here is the email David Forst sent to players today: https://t.co/rwHqiAeKla pic.twitter.com/rEZK2RC1eZ— Robert Murray (@ByRobertMurray) May 27, 2020Basically: “We’re not going to pay you, but you’re still prohibited by the terms of your contract from seeking employment elsewhere.”I asked Garrett Broshuis, a former minor league pitcher who is now an attorney with a long history of advocating for the rights of minor-leaguers, for his thoughts on the subject. “No other industry in America operates like this,” Broshuis said. “It’s such an unreasonable expectation, to think that even though I’m not paying you anymore, you can’t go and take your skills that you’ve worked so hard to develop and earn a living somewhere else. It highlights the complete ridiculousness of this contract, which is a contract out of the 1920s still, with the fact that they own your rights for so long, and there’s very little the player can do about it.”The A’s are using Paragraph 23 of the Uniform Player Contract, a section that addresses suspension of a contract. Here’s the standard contract; scroll down to XXIII.So do the A’s minor-leaguers have any real legal recourse?“It would take a Curt Flood-like player to actually challenge it,” Broshuis said. “It would be a variabled action, most likely would take an actual legal action in court, because it’s difficult to see how the commissioner’s office would come out with an alternative interpretation. It would take a very brave player to challenge something like this.”First of all, only a handful of players would even make sense. It would have to be someone who doesn’t figure to be in the mix at the big-league level this year, even with the expanded rosters. But, it also would have to be a minor-leaguer good enough that the A’s wouldn’t want to just cut him to end the hassle (allowing him to be a free agent). And it would have to be someone not concerned how his legal actions would impact how other baseball teams see him. MORE: Explaining the controversial pay cuts owners want players to accept But here’s the biggest thing: It’s probably not worth the effort because the timeline just doesn’t make sense. It seems likely that minor league baseball will resume in 2021, which means we’re really only talking about three months of pay the A’s minor-leaguers are missing (the minor league regular seasons finish at the end of August). The legal process would certainly take much, much longer. Flood’s case started in 1969 — he refused report after an October trade sent him from the Cardinals to Phillies — and wasn’t resolved until the United States Supreme Court ruled in MLB’s favor in June 1972.  So, basically, the A’s ballplayers have no real recourse.  Even though the club isn’t going to pay them, they can’t become free agents and there’s really nothing they can do about it. The MLBPA isn’t primarily concerned with players until they reach the majors, and the MLBPA has other pressing matters to deal with at the moment. Minor league players don’t have their own union, though Broshuis is part of Advocates for Minor Leaguers, a new organization founded to help represent minor league players. Broshuis has long been leading the charge to raise salaries for minor league players, and this is an extension of those efforts. “It just goes to show the root of the issue, which is the lack of representation. Minor-leaguers have never had a union, they’ve never had somebody looking out for their interest” Broshuis said. “This contract has changed very little in the last 100 years. That is the void we’re stepping into. This situation highlights why an organization like ours is so desperately needed, and why we need to grow this organization, and why we need to be out there advocating on behalf of these players. They need it more than ever.” The Oakland A’s have decided not to pay their minor league players for the rest of the season. That’s their choice, first reported by the San Francisco Chronicle on Tuesday.The A’s, along with every other MLB team, initially committed to paying their minor-leaguers $400 per week through the end of May as the sport deals with the impact of the shutdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic. last_img read more

Klopp says Liverpool dragged into a fight


first_img– ‘He probably has season ticket’ –The frustrations provoked Klopp into his argument with a Swansea supporter around the hour mark and he admitted: “He was shouting at me all the time but I reacted. I am a human being, not just a professional manager.“I am sure I am not the first manager who has a problem. He probably has a season ticket.”Klopp added: “Swansea knew that to win today they needed our help and unfortunately we gave it to them.“They did the right things to deserve to win a game like this tonight and we didn’t deserve it.“We could have equalised at the end, but didn’t have that luck.”For new Swans manager Carlos Carvalhal, this was a tactical triumph as he used a five-man defence to deny Liverpool space and then hit them on the break.The Portuguese likes to use seafood metaphors to describe players as either lobsters or sardines, but this time he was borrowing motor racing analogies as he left Liverpool on the hard shoulder.Carvalhal said: “I talked with my players and said this (Liverpool) is a really strong team.“They are like a Formula One car. But at 4:00pm in London it will be difficult to speed, they would be a car like any other.“We needed to make sure there was traffic, we could not let them have open roads to drive in.”Share on: WhatsApp Swansea, United Kingdom | AFP | Jurgen Klopp blamed his players for becoming embroiled in a fight at Swansea City as they lost their unbeaten 18-match run to the Premier League’s bottom club.Liverpool failed to grab a late draw to extend their lead over fifth-placed Tottenham as they lost to a single goal from Alfie Mawson — and Klopp himself clashed verbally with a home supporter.It was Liverpool’s first defeat since October, but the points were priceless for Swansea, who cut the gap between themselves and those above the relegation places to just three points.He said: “I am more frustrated about the performance than the result.“We were just not good enough, especially in the first half. We didn’t play how we wanted to play.“We didn’t keep the right positions we needed to, to cause them problems and didn’t stretch them.“We gave them the opportunity to score and then we did exactly what Swansea wanted.“They didn’t need to play, they needed to fight and we did exactly what they wanted and their confidence grew.”Liverpool missed plenty of opportunities for their normally clinical strikers Sadio Mane, Mo Salah and Roberto Firmino.They also came up against a goalkeeper at the top of his game in Swansea’s Polish number one Lukasz Fabianski.The only goal came against the run of play in the 41st minute when Mawson swept the ball in at corner and Virgil van Dijk had misplaced a header as he tried to clear.It summed up an awkward league debut for Van Dijk, who had previously only played in one FA Cup tie since his record £75 million move from Southampton.last_img read more