TFA European Development


first_imgIn line with Touch Football Australia’s direction to assist in the International Development of the Sport, National Coaching Director Dennis Coffey has returned from a development tour of Europe. Whilst in Europe, DC as he is commonly known, conducted a number of coaching courses in Germany, France, England and Scotland, with participants from these nations and also Belgium, Ireland, Wales, and Guernsey, training and accrediting over 100 new coaches. Participants included the likes of current Elite players and Presidents of the National Associtations. The courses will greatly assist in the development of coaches in these European Countries, which will further lead to the development of skills and the game overall.last_img read more

Idle No Mores thunder heard through walls of Prime Ministers Office


first_img(Prime Minister Stephen Harper meets with AFN National Chief Shawn Atleo and delegation of First Nations leaders. Photo/PMO handout)APTN National NewsWhile Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo sat in the meeting room of the high-security Langevin Block building flanked by Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan and Treasury Board President Tony Clement he could hear the sounds of the Idle No More protest that had shut down the streets outside.Atleo, who attended the meeting with Prime Minister Stephen Harper Friday despite heated pressure from Manitoba, Ontario and some Saskatchewan chiefs, said the sounds of the protests gave the meeting added weight.“Listening to the power voices of the Idle No More rally that was surrounding the Prime Minister’s Office, it added a sense of strength, that we are in a moment we can’t go back from,” said Atleo. “That our people will stand up for the land, the water, the air.”Atleo led a delegation of about 16 First Nations leaders to meet with the prime minister and several cabinet ministers.During the meeting, thousands of people marched down Ottawa’s Wellington Street which separates Parliament Hill from Langevin Block which houses the Prime Minister’s Office. Rallies also unfolded across the country, from Whitehorse to Halifax, Yellowknife to Winnipeg, from Vancouver to Toronto to Montreal to Fredericton, thousands of people rallied under the banner of Idle No More. Nova Scotia also saw a rail blockade by members of Millbrook First Nation.There were over 200 Idle No More related events around the world, from London, England, to Texas, to New Zealand.A massive round dance also framed the lawn of Parliament Hill at one point and the drums shook the air.“I am blown away, I am filled with pride, I am just standing here trying to take this in,” said Molly Peters, a Mi’kmaq Idle No More organizer from Nova Scotia, who was standing on the steps of Parliament Hill watching the round dance slowly turn on the lawn below.“I came for unity,” said Stacie Landon, from Neyaahiinigmiing First Nation in Ontario. “I am here for my children’s future.”Janice Trudeau, from unceded Wikwemikong First Nation, said she took the streets in Ottawa in solidarity with other Indigenous people.“I came in solidarity with other Anishinabe people to form a united front against Harper,” she saidAnd while the grassroots flooded the streets of Canada with round dances, songs and drums, fissures developed between First Nations chiefs over the meeting with the prime minister.A few hours before the meeting began, chiefs from Ontario and Manitoba stated they would not be participating and warned that they would be initiating economic disruptions on Jan. 16.“We can’t live in poverty anymore while Canadians live this great life,” said Grand Chief Gordon Peters of the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians. “We’ll stop it the only way we can stop it…Stop the roads, stop the rails, stop the transportation of goods.”Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, who marched Friday morning along with about 150 others, including Ontario and Saskatchewan chiefs to the door of the Langevin building, said Manitoba chiefs would be standing with the grassroots.“Across the tables in this room and across the street paper crosses hands and artificial laws are made to control us. We are saying no more,” said Nepinak as he stood at the gates to Parliament Hill and across the street from Langevin.Nepinak and Peters were among a number of chiefs who opposed the meeting. They wanted Governor Genernal David Johnston to appear along with the prime minister and the chiefs wanted it to be held in a larger venue. Many said they also supported Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence who has been on a liquids-only fast since Dec. 11. Spence had said she’d end her protest if the governor general and the prime minister met with First Nations leaders.“It’s important for both of them to be there at the same time with all leaders, not just some,” Spence told reporters early Friday outside her Victoria Island compound where she’s spent most of her days in a teepee.Spence has said she’ll continue to abstain from solid foods.Yet, despite this opposition, Atleo led chiefs from the Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan into the meeting with Harper.The AFN released a list of points they planned to discuss with the prime minister and Duncan, Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, Clement and senior bureaucrats.Atleo said the meeting lasted from about 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. and it was done with a tone of “respectful dialogue.”Atleo said he felt the chiefs who attended the meeting managed to convince Harper that he needed to personally take charge of the issues between Canada and First Nations.“The ability now to have direct prime ministerial engagement on matters of great concern for our people…including unilateral legislative development…We now have a forum…that we did not have before,” said Atleo, in an interview with APTN National News. “It is incumbent and the responsibility of the prime minister and the Crown to honour and implement the treaty relationship with First Nations. It will require a lot of work.”Atleo acknowledged that many of the chiefs from Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan were against the meeting because they wanted to stand behind Spence.Spence is expected to continue her fast because the prime minister and the governor general did not appear together at the meeting.Atleo said he understands the chiefs’ position, but he has been pushing to meet Spence’s demands which appeared to shift.“On Dec. 31, on New Year’s Eve, we had a national conference call with 50 or 60 chiefs on the line and that if we were to secure a meeting with the prime minister and governor general, that Chief Theresa Spence would end her hunger strike,” said Atleo. “It turns out we all either didn’t understand or there was miscommunication. Twenty-four hours later, I had had chiefs saying we need to go sit with Chief Spence and she said she would continue until there was a meeting with the prime minister and the government general.”On the Conservative government’s side, Duncan said he felt the meeting was “constructive,” but he wouldn’t go into specifics about some of the demands the chiefs had like resource revenue sharing.However, he did say that although it was discussed, Bill C-45 and Bill C-38 would not be repealed as requested by many First Nations across the country.“We’re quite comfortable that we have met our constitutional obligations with those bills and we believe there is every reason to proceed,” said Duncan.The Prime Minister’s Office issued a release saying that Harper had a “good, frank dialogue with First Nations.”The prime minister says both sides did not agree on all matters, but First Nations brought “serious and important proposals to the table.”Harper says he will debrief his cabinet onFriday’s meeting and committed to meeting with National Chief Shawn Atleo in the coming weeks to “review next steps.”The Prime Minister was initially going to attend only at the beginning and end but took part in the entire meeting, which went two hours longer than planned.Serpent River Chief Isadore Day, who opposed Atleo attending the meeting, said many chiefs were “shocked” the meeting occurred.Day said Atleo had no “business” talking about treaties at the meeting.“I’d like to denounce the national chief even discussing treaties when the majority of the treaty communities weren’t even at the table,” said Day.Day warned Atleo earlier in an email earlier in the day Friday that if he went to the meeting he could face a motion of non-confidence from chiefs.“The talk is that a lot of people aren’t happy, obviously, you know people are shocked, folks are saying that the best thing for people to do is take a bit of a step back and go home and do something thinking,” said Day. “How could in one day, the national chief say we are united and that we are all standing behind Chief Spence and in the next day, take this entourage to a meeting. That is not sitting well with the majority of the chiefs in assembly.”Former National Chief Matthew Coon Come who was one of the first to arrive to the Langevin offices told reporters earlier that it would be a lost opportunity if chief didn’t take advantage of the meeting.*Note APTN National News has changed the terminology of Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence’s protest to a liquids-only fastlast_img read more

Signs of Movement on Marijuana Issue in Annapolis


first_imgMaryland could soon see a stronger marijuana decriminalization law. It seems well on the path to outright legalization (though perhaps not this session), if the tone of last week’s Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee hearing on a slate of marijuana bills is any indication.Senate Bill 456 establishes medical necessity as an affirmative defense against a marijuana possession charge and requires the court to dismiss the charges under these circumstances. Senate Bill 517 extends decriminalization to all amounts of marijuana, and Senate Bill 531 creates a legal marketplace for marijuana in Maryland. The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard all three bills simultaneously on March 4.Sen. Bobby Zirkin (D-Baltimore County), chair of Judicial Proceedings and sponsor of the two of the bills, scheduled these items ahead of the 14 others to be heard that day, providing ample time for those who came to testify in marked contrast to the scheduling of the criminal justice bills heard earlier this session.Sara Love, public policy director for the ACLU Maryland, was first to testify in support of the bills. She noted that in 70 percent of searches conducted by police with smelling marijuana as the probable cause, no drugs were found, suggesting that the claim is often a pretense for search and seizure. By extension, Love argued, laws criminalizing the use or possession of marijuana have become a pretext for otherwise unconstitutional searches that have racially disparate impacts, necessitating the reform of such laws.Sen. James Brochin (D-Baltimore County) pushed Love on her claim, and asked, if in 30 percent of searches police did find drugs or worse, was it not worth preserving their ability to search. “We have a system in our society where police aren’t just allowed to go in [and search],” said Love. “Is it worth it if [police] search everybody’s houses if they find extra guns and drugs? No, because we have a system of justice. They have to have probable cause to believe that that person is breaking the law.”When Brochin continued asking if the search results indicated marijuana was a gateway to further illegal activity, Zirkin interrupted stating that Brochin’s teenage daughter, seated behind her father, was shaking her head in disagreement.The hearing room broke out in laughter, and a lightness of mood underscored the movement that has occurred on the issue of marijuana in Maryland. Though some senators expressed lingering skepticism about the growing body of research showing fewer deleterious effects of marijuana as compared to alcohol, no one forced that particular point.At one point, Sen. Bob Cassilly (R-Harford County) seemed interested in finding a way to address some of the social consequences marijuana laws have wrought on the state (labor issues related to drug convictions ), even if he would prefer the laws otherwise remain on the books.If opposition among the committee’s senators seemed tepid, support for the various measures from members of Judicial Proceedings was much more aggressive, with opposition testimony facing some strong headwinds.When Joseph Cassilly of the Harford County State’s Attorney’s Office testified in opposition to legalization, Sen. Jamie Raskin (D-Montgomery County), sponsor of the legalization bill, asked whether alcohol was more addictive than marijuana.“Look at the scientific studies,” said Cassilly. “I’m not going to give you my personal opinion.”“All the studies that have been forwarded to us have [found] that [alcohol] is far more addictive. It’s not even close,” Raskin replied.After Chief David Morris, as a representative of the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association, asserted that for every study supporters produced to bolster their claims, opponents could produce a study showing the opposite, Zirkin pounced.“Sen. [Christopher] Shank and I were looking last year high and low for any evidence that decriminalization – not legalization, but decriminalization – had any of the ill-effects that the chiefs stated at their press conference last year,” said Zirkin. “We found none. I mean literally zero, in any state that when they moved from a criminal sanction to a civil sanction, that there was any of the ill-effects that you’ve said. We asked for the evidence last year and we got nothing. Over the interim, we’ve gotten nothing. And at this point in time, I’ve still got nothing.”Zirkin then suggested Morris provide whatever data he had available, but the message seemed clear – this debate is guided by data, and the data strongly leans in the direction of passing, at the minimum, a stronger decriminalization bill.There was no real indication legalization will become a reality this session, but the legislative landscape seems to be tilting in that direction, with strong support, at least in Judicial Proceedings, for further movement away from the criminalization that has been the historic approach towards marijuana in Maryland. ralejandro@afro.comlast_img read more

What You Can Learn From This YouTube Stars Apology Debacle


first_img Nina Zipkin What You Can Learn From This YouTube Star’s Apology Debacle Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Apology –shares 4 min read Image credit: Jason LaVeris | Getty Images Logan Paul said he was sorry — twice — after he seemingly filmed and posted video of the body of a person who had committed suicide. Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture.center_img Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand We may only be a couple of days into 2018, but we already have our first public apology on the books. That dishonor goes to Logan Paul, a 22-year-old YouTube star with more than 15 million subscribers.Paul filmed his visit to Aokigahara, a forest near Mt. Fuji in Japan, which has gained notoriety for being the site of hundreds of suicides. The video Paul posted on Dec. 31 on YouTube was titled, “We found a dead body in the Japanese Suicide Forest…” and it was viewed 6.3 million times in the 24 hours after it went live. Paul has since removed the video from the site.According to New York Magazine, Paul, who included a link to the American Society for Suicide Prevention, introduced the video thusly: “This is not clickbait. This is the most real vlog I’ve ever posted to this channel…I think this definitely marks a moment in YouTube history because I’m pretty sure this has never hopefully happened to anyone on YouTube ever…Now with that said: Buckle the fuck up, because you’re never gonna see a video like this again!”Related: 7 Tips for Entrepreneurs Looking to Build Their Brands on YouTubePaul has a following made up of predominantly young kids and teens and is best known for comedy sketches, pranks and being the older brother of fellow social media star Jake Paul, who has been in the news recently for offenses ranging from racism, bullying and abuse and property damage, the last of which led to his firing from his Disney Channel series.Logan Paul’s most recent raft of tweets is akin to watching a dawning of realization and regret in real time. The first, posted at 7 p.m. on Jan. 1, is an announcement of his latest vlog.new vlogreal life Pokémon Go in JAPAN?? go ay ??— Logan Paul (@LoganPaul) January 2, 2018The second, posted three hours later, is a photo of an apology written in the iPhone notes app that starts with an “I’m sorry,” and an explanation of the intent behind the video, without ever specifically saying that what he did was wrong.The closest he comes to admitting wrongdoing is this: “I am often reminded of how big a reach I truly have & with great power comes great responsibility…for the first time in my life, I’m regretful to say I handled that power incorrectly. It won’t happen again.” The apology includes a profanity, a peace sign emoji and the hashtag for what Paul calls his fanbase —  #Logang4Life.Dear Internet, pic.twitter.com/42OCDBhiWg— Logan Paul (@LoganPaul) January 2, 2018And then there was the final tweet of the trilogy, posted at 11:45 a.m. on Jan. 2, a video message featuring a serious and chagrined Paul front and center.So sorry. pic.twitter.com/JkYXzYsrLX— Logan Paul (@LoganPaul) January 2, 2018“I’ve made a severe and continuous lapse in judgement. And I don’t expect to be forgiven. I’m simply here to apologize,” he says in the video. “There are a lot of things that I should have done differently, and I didn’t. And for that, from the bottom of my heart, I am sorry.”He continues, “For my fans who are defending my actions, please don’t. They do not deserve to be defended. … In the world I live in, I share almost everything I do. The intent is never to be heartless, cruel or malicious. Like I said, I made a huge mistake. I don’t expect to be forgiven. I’m just here to apologize. I’m ashamed of myself. I’m disappointed in myself. And I promise to better. I will be better. Thank you.”So what can you take away from Paul’s experience? First off, it’s always a good practice to have a sounding board outside of your circle to review anything you post online. If do you make a mistake, admit it right away. Don’t hide behind your past successes or what you meant to happen when you took a particular action. Don’t make excuses for your behavior. Make amends until you get it right. And remember that there is a big difference between “I’m sorry you were offended,” and “I’m sorry. I was wrong.” January 2, 2018 Add to Queue Entrepreneur Staff Next Article Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

As the SportsBetting Industry Transforms Entrepreneurs May Find It Hard to Get


first_imgSmall Business Heroes Kristi Dosh Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Next Article 5 min read The legal sports-betting market in the U.S. was worth an estimated $270 million in 2017 — with another $2.5 billion to $3 billion in black market betting, according to research firm Eilers & Krejcik Gaming, LLC. Accordingly, the recent Supreme Court decision in Murray v. NCAA that effectively lifts the federal ban on sports betting, allowing states to make their own laws and regulations, has captured the attention of businesses and entrepreneurs across the nation.Current gambling operators are racing to take advantage of the potential windfall headed their way, but experts say it could be a long time before new ventures can benefit from this decision. That’s because most of the existing state bills already circulating specifically limit the number of companies that can work directly with casinos or race tracks.”This means companies with past experience in the gambling marketplace, ready-to-go infrastructure and strong brand reputations will almost certainly gain selection for these mega-contracts,” says Marc Edelman, a professor of law at Baruch College who consults extensively on sports and gaming law.Related: The History of Online Gambling (Infographic)Edelman notes that none of the state bills proposing to allow and regulate sports gambling propose a true free market solution. That means even startup entrepreneurs with creative business ideas won’t be able to simply enter the marketplace, he says.Until now, only Nevada has allowed betting on individual games, while Delaware, Oregon and Montana have allowed limited betting. The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA), enacted in 1992, exempted out those states. Now, however, all states will be allowed to pass their own laws related to sports betting, and there’s also the potential Congress will attempt to enact new legislation that would govern all states equally.As the court case has been working its way through the system the past few years, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia have been preparing for the possibility of enacting new legislation post-PASPA. Sports Illustrated recently tracked the status of legislation in all 50 states, showing many are considering opening the door to sports betting.Eilers & Krejcik Gaming has estimated that as many as 32 states will enact new legislation allowing sports betting within the next five years. It estimates the resulting market would be worth $6.03 billion in annual revenue — $7.1 billion to $15.8 billion if all 50 states allowed regulated sports betting.Related: Entrepreneurs and Gamblers Have Much in CommonYou won’t have to be one of the big gambling operators to take advantage of the new market, however. There are numerous opportunities for data analytics, content creation and more.Tyler Wyatt, an independent handicapping expert who runs Three For The Money, is preparing for hundreds, if not thousands, of new companies to enter his space in the market.”Gambling data and gambling news will initially become a commodity. Companies that can track the movements of both betting lines and the amounts of money wagered will have a product they can offer at a premium.”Currently, Wyatt’s site offers bettors the ability to submit a request about a particular game and receive back a detailed analysis with over 1,500 data sets and a projected outcome of the game. He says it’s not something just anyone can jump into and make a name for themselves immediately.Related: 11 Sports Businesses Using Entrepreneurial Skills to Disrupt the Marketplace”I’ve purchased data that I didn’t have, scoured the internet to find data I was missing, and spent countless sleepless nights to compile the data sets and put together the program that we have at Three For The Money.”While those with deep pockets might be able to simply buy the data, Wyatt says the blue sky in the market is elsewhere.”There will be niche segments of the sports wagering market that can be capitalized. Apps that provide up-to-date player data, betting line movements, trends and more all in one place will be valuable.”If you’re one of those entrepreneurs looking to take advantage of the new opportunities, Edelman warns that you be careful to manage your risks.”There are no shortage of gaming lawyers who will tell you exactly what you want to hear,” he says.Related: Elite Sports Teams Are Much Better at Creating Powerful Cultures Than Startups — Here Are 5 Tips You Can Steal”The best lawyers will push back on ideas and encourage [you] to refine them in such a way that you are able to maintain the core elements of your business plan but at the same time encourage changes to make sure to keep your risk level manageable.”Edelman says you should choose counsel that is mindful of the developments in state law.”The future of your sports-gambling or interactive fantasy sports business will be driven very much by your ability to operate within the framework of state laws, and many of these laws do not yet even exist.”In other words, it’s not only entrepreneurs who will be trying to cash in on the new marketplace, but attorneys and other business advisors as well. As the Sports-Betting Industry Transforms, Entrepreneurs May Find It Hard to Get in on Gambling Profits — but Related Businesses Will Thrive Founder and Publicist, Guide My Brand –shares May 21, 2018 There are opportunities for entrepreneurs as states begin allowing regulated sports betting. Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Add to Queue Image credit: Lars Baron | Getty Images Enroll Now for $5 Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Guest Writerlast_img read more

FTC Fines Two Health Apps That Lack Adequate Evidence to Support Their


first_img Add to Queue February 24, 2015 FTC Fines Two Health Apps That ‘Lack Adequate Evidence to Support Their Claims’ Register Now » You can do so much on your smartphone — text, call, Snapchat, Instagram, CandyCrush, Tinder, Seamless, Uber…the list goes on. Among this blur of activity, an entire fleet of health apps have sprung up that harness the smartphone as a diagnosis tool of sorts. But a smartphone interaction with a doctor isn’t a substitute for in-person professional medical diagnosis and the FTC wants everyone to know it.Yesterday, the FTC cracked down on two smartphone apps — both of which say they can detect early symptoms of melanoma — for failing to make this distinction explicit.The makers of MelApp and Mole Detective, two apps that analyze user photographs of moles, blemishes and worrisome skin areas in order to calculate the corresponding melanoma risk as low, medium or high, were fined by the FTC for deceptively claiming that their apps “accurately analyzed melanoma risk and could assess such risk in early stages,” the agency wrote in a press release. “The marketers lacked adequate evidence to support such claims.”Related: The World’s Newest Lie Detector Could Be a Sensor Implanted in Your MouthThe apps, which were on the market from 2011 to 2012, were downloaded by thousands of people. While health apps have the potential to improve our health, many are relatively untested. That’s worrisome, particularly for apps that claim to provide early diagnosis and medical advice.Consider, for example, the 2013 paper published in the Journal of the American Association, which zeroed in on four melanoma detection apps and found that three of them “incorrectly classified 30 percent or more of melanomas as unconcerning.”With the settlement, the makers of MelApp and Mole Detective will no longer be able to advertise the apps as accurate diagnostic tools until there is enough scientific evidence, “in the form of human clinical testing of the device,” to substantiate the claim. Related: FDA Grants 23andMe Approval to Sell Test for Rare Genetic Condition Health Guest Writer Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Businesscenter_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Laura Entis 2 min read –shares Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Next Article last_img read more

Index Exchange Introduces Adaptive Timeout Incorporating Machine Learning into Header Bidding


first_imgIndex Exchange Introduces Adaptive Timeout, Incorporating Machine Learning into Header Bidding PRNewswireMay 22, 2019, 6:29 pmMay 22, 2019 New Product Makes Publisher Page Speeds Smarter by Adapting to Each User, Creating More Opportunities for Bidders and Revenue for PublishersIndex Exchange, the world’s largest independent ad exchange, introduced Adaptive Timeout, an innovative product that will boost publisher revenue through advanced machine learning, while optimizing page speed. By measuring device and network conditions, the Adaptive Timeout feature leverages an algorithm that determines a custom, intelligent timeout for each individual user on each individual page view. This includes a time landscape, which is the time it takes from a bid request to a bid response for each participating bidder. By adaptively modifying the timeout, the feature ensures the maximum number of bids make it to the publisher, thereby increasing revenue, while improving user experience in each unique condition.Previously, publishers have largely relied on imprecise, fixed-value timeouts for all users, which led to publishers missing opportunities while waiting for bid responses in latency-constrained environments. Static timeouts led to a trade-off, whereby publishers had to sacrifice user experience to wait longer for header bidding, or sacrifice revenue by setting aggressive timeouts. Adaptive Timeout introduces intelligence and machine learning into header bidding, allowing for an adaptive timeout that is tailored to the user’s device and network latency.Marketing Technology News: Amazon Dominates E-Commerce Share, Ebay and Walmart Less of a Focus, Feedvisor Study Finds“Incorporating machine learning into header bidding is a natural evolution of the product line, and adaptive timeout is the first of many innovations we’ll be enhancing with this technology,” said Gabriel DeWitt, Vice President, Product at Index Exchange. “We’re happy we can bring this level of sophistication to our publisher partners, as they’ve been looking to leverage automation instead of internal tech resources to optimize their configurations.”Adaptive Timeout is calculated using the device type, connection speed and an aggregation of the recent history of a particular user’s time landscape. Through the use of an adaptive machine learning algorithm, the outcome is overall improvement to page speed on fast devices with fast connections and more bids from the header reaching the publishers ad server, without any additional development.Marketing Technology News: Vyond Announces End of Beta for Vyond Studio, Enhanced Security Features“Our long-standing partnership with Index Exchange is a testament to the company’s continued commitment to innovation and maximizing publisher revenue,” said Jeremy Hlavacek, Head of Revenue, Watson Advertising. “This latest feature will ensure more bid responses are making it into our ad server, while improving user experience. It’s a huge opportunity for revenue growth.”Marketing Technology News: Kneron Debuts Edge AI Chip, Bringing AI to Devices Everywhere Adaptive Timeoutadvanced machine learningGabriel DeWittIndex ExchangeMarketing TechnologyNews Previous ArticleUsabilla Named a Strong Performer in 2019Next ArticleDigital Audio Can Be An Advertising MVP – If Navigated Correctlylast_img read more

Northern Exposure Can the Northwest Passage live up to its billing as


first_img What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation December 19, 201811:25 AM ESTLast UpdatedDecember 28, 20189:56 AM EST Filed under News Economy Ships that have successfully gone “over the top” via Arctic routes such as the Northwest Passage and the Northern Sea Route along Russia’s coastline have clocked major time savings: for instance, the Nunavik took 26 days to deliver its cargo, which is 15 fewer than the traditional voyage along the east coast of the United States and then through the Panama Canal.Yet some experts say a multitude of challenges, including poor charting, unpredictable weather and a severe lack of port infrastructure and ice-breaking capability make Canada’s Arctic more likely to become a site for tourism and smaller-scale destinational shipping than a maritime superhighway.What’s certain is that Canada’s responsibilities in the region — amid rising pleasure traffic, environmental concerns and aggressive investment by foreign powers — are growing more significant all the time.“Canada’s motivation to be more engaged in the Arctic won’t come from an economic incentive like in Russia, but it should come from a desire to assert its sovereignty,” said Malte Humpert, senior fellow at the Washington, D.C.-based Arctic Institute. “A country should have the capabilities to venture into its waters at any time of year, under any circumstance and right now Canada doesn’t really have that ability. That’s a big difference between Canada and Russia and it’s one that matters.”The Nunavik wasn’t the first cargo ship to use the Northwest Passage as a shortcut between the North Atlantic and the North Pacific. The bulk carrier Nordic Orion carried a load of coal from Vancouver to the Finnish port of Pori through the network of straits in 2013, but needed a Canadian icebreaker’s help. That voyage saved four days of travel time and US$200,000, according to Nordic Bulk Carriers A/S, the Danish owner of the ship.Similarly, Russia’s Northern Sea Route, stretching from Murmansk near the border with Norway to the Bering Strait between Siberia and Alaska, offers a quicker connection between lucrative Asian and European markets. A ship using the route to go from Yokohama, Japan, to Rotterdam in the Netherlands would cut roughly 37 per cent, or 7,635 kilometres, off its journey compared to shipping via the Suez Canal.Emboldened by these time savings, as well as growing interest and investment from China, Russia has aggressively pursued an economic expansion strategy in the Arctic, adding to a network of military installations, railways, ports, radar infrastructure and icebreaking capabilities that are a legacy of the Cold War.The vast majority of ships currently using the route carry oil, gas and minerals from Russia’s resource-rich Arctic coast. But this summer, A.P. Moller–Maersk Group, the world’s biggest shipper, sent through the first container ship, raising hopes the route could serve as a viable path to market for consumer goods.“I always compare it to the gold rush in the American West,” Humpert said. “Initially, it was this very arduous trek reserved for specialized people looking for resources, then it became more mainstream.”The opportunities created by retreating ice haven’t escaped the attention of Jim Carr, Minister of International Trade Diversification, who hails from Manitoba, home to the port of Churchill, Canada’s only deepwater Arctic port.An aerial view of the port of Churchill, Canada’s only deepwater Arctic port. Sponsored By: For example, China, which is attempting to assert itself as an Arctic presence through investments in the Russian Arctic, sent a research icebreaker through the Northwest Passage last year, she notes.“It may not become the Suez Canal, but just by having some port infrastructure there, you create a lot of opportunities for destinational shipping for lots of things,” Shadian said. “What we need is a long-term strategy.”Carr too, prefers to take the long view, comparing the region’s potential to previous country-building efforts.“If you take some stretches of the Trans-Canada Highway, you wonder how could anyone have had a vision to tie this country together, coast to coast to coast, when there were so few people there, and prospects were uncertain at best,” he said. “Yet a railway was built, a road was built, people came, economies were developed. I don’t know ultimately where this northern potential might rest, but I do know it’s underdeveloped.”But any strategy for the north will have to address what could be the double-edged sword of climate change. Temperatures in the Arctic are warming more than twice as fast as anywhere else on earth, with the summer ice extent already nearly half what it was in 1980s.Warmer temperatures could make the Northwest Passage 30 per cent more accessible by 2050, but could also further erode the temporary ice roads that provide crucial access to mines and other inland terrain, according to research by Laurence Smith, a geography professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.His research suggests rising temperatures could reduce the Canadian area accessible by winter roads by 13 per cent by mid-century.“That’s one of the often-overlooked downsides of climate change up there, the negative impact on land systems, in particular, winter roads and ice roads,” he said. “These are things that require cold in the winter to freeze solidly and safely.”Some question whether resource extraction is even the right way to develop the Arctic, given the environmental track record of such activities elsewhere. Nordic countries such as Sweden, Finland and Norway are attempting to take advantage of the cold temperatures in northern communities by attracting data centres.“There are a lot of development opportunities besides oil and gas. It’s just that oil and gas are what we’ve always been doing and it’s the quick money,” Smith said. “There’s a small population in the Arctic and it wouldn’t take much for Northern Canada to serve as an example to really approach the Arctic from a different perspective.”The ideal development scenario might involve a combination of old and new, said Bob McLeod, Northwest Territories Premier. The abundance of resources in the North make them “hard to get away from,” he said, but parts of the area are ideal for testing cold weather technology, cars and planes.“We’d like more investment in resource development, but also more in innovation so we can move off fossil fuels,” he said.There are other problems, including political ones. For example, Canada claims sovereignty over much of the Northwest Passage, but the U.S. believes it is an international waterway. Pursuing a maritime shipping strategy akin to the Northern Sea Route could stir up that old dispute.“It was kind of a moot issue when nobody bothered to go up there, when it was frozen all the time,” Stephens said. “But if it becomes a huge area of transshipment, that opens up a range of other issues.”• Email: npowell@nationalpost.com | Twitter: Naomi Powell More Featured Stories Reddit Email Recommended For YouEuro drops as German investor morale darkens, Swiss franc nears 2019 highWall Street finds blockchain hard to tame after early euphoriaAbbott to hike production of lower-cost glucose monitors as diabetes soarsU.S. Senate to grill Facebook over plans for Libra cryptocurrencyTech executives head to Capitol Hill for antitrust hearing advertisement 0 Comments Northern Exposure: Can the Northwest Passage live up to its billing as a maritime superhighway? What is certain is that Canada’s responsibilities in the region are growing more significant all the time ← Previous Next → John Woods/The Canadian Press Mario Tama/Getty Images Twitter Handout Fednav Ltd. Facebook “The season is extending,” Carr said. “The potential for Churchill to become an important part of a Canadian northern strategy that includes enhanced trade routes is real.”Yet the Arctic’s potential as a shortcut for global shippers is often overstated, said Hugh Stephens, executive fellow at the University of Calgary School of Public Policy. This is particularly true for Canada’s route, where a range of factors, including significant natural drawbacks, make it unlikely to host the kind of traffic seen by its Russian counterpart.“It’s wishful thinking, frankly,” Stephens said. “I won’t say there isn’t some potential. There’s obviously some as the Arctic gradually opens up. But is it going to be a game changer? Not for a long time in my view.”For one thing, ships crossing the Northwest Passage must contend with the straits of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, where charting is poor, waters can be shallow and, importantly, ice tends to linger.As a result, the Northwest Passage’s shipping season is shorter, running from August to early October at best, and decidedly more unpredictable than the Northern Sea Route, which is reliably open from early July through late November with the help of Russia’s nuclear powered icebreakers.In 2017, 33 vessels traversed the Northwest Passage, the largest number on record, but this year just three ships made the voyage due to “severe and persistent ice,” according to logs kept by the Scott Polar Research Institute. Only one of those vessels in either year was a cargo ship, with the rest classed as icebreakers, adventure yachts and cruise ships.Meanwhile, hundreds of resource-carrying ships skipped among the 17 ports lining the Northern Sea Route — including half-a-dozen deepwater ports — with 27 ships traversing the route’s full distance, according to Sergey Balmisov, head of the Centre for High North Logistics at Nord University in Norway.“There are also 30 to 40 loading points that are not official ports, so this Russian route is very different from Canada,” he said.The restoration of regular freight rail service to the Port of Churchill could open up new opportunities for the shipment of grain, bulk commodities and resources, but that lonely outpost pales in comparison to Russia’s sophisticated coastal infrastructure and equipment.In addition to its ports, Russia has 50 vessels, including four nuclear-powered ships, in its icebreaking fleet, which is more than all other countries combined, according to a global inventory managed by the United States Coast Guard. By comparison, Canada’s fleet of icebreakers, the next largest, grew to 10 ships this year following the purchase of three used icebreakers from Sweden.Much of Russia’s focus can be traced to its deep cultural connection to the north and more importantly, economic incentives, Humpert said.The Russian Arctic is home to two million people and generates 20 per cent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), making it a key contributor to national wealth. Canada’s three northern territories are populated by 122,651 people and accounted for just 0.5 per cent of GDP in 2017, according to Statistics Canada.Furthermore, Russia controls 60 per cent of the Arctic coastline and likely the vast majority of the untapped fossil fuels in the region, which is estimated to contain 30 per cent of the world’s undiscovered natural gas and 13 per cent of its undiscovered oil, according to a 2008 U.S. Geological Survey.Canada has a share of the hydrocarbon and mineral resources, of course, but the economics of retrieving them may not justify the cost, Stephens said.“If the only resources we had were in the Far North, of course we’d go north to get them too, but at the moment, a lot of them are more available in more southerly areas, north of Edmonton, south of the 60th parallel,” he said. “There’s no shortage of oil at the moment and maybe in 30 or 40 years the use of fossil fuels will be reduced. So they may end up being stranded assets.”Aside from oil, opening the Arctic could provide other moderate new shipping opportunities, particularly for exporting from existing operations and supplying small communities in the area. But other countries are also eyeing its long-term possibilities, said Jessica Shadian, president of Arctic 360, an organization studying investment in the region.The ice fields of Ellesmere Island are retreating according to NASA. Climate change will pose a challenge to the development of the Arctic, experts warn, especially if ice roads become impassable. Northern Exposure is a three-part series that examines how a warming Arctic opens up the Northwest Passage and economic opportunities, but also creates headaches.Ask Tim Keane to recount his voyage through the fabled Northwest Passage and he’ll spend a good bit of time talking about the things that aren’t there.“The scarcity of traffic, the vastness of the place, the total remoteness, that’s what I remember,” said the manager of Arctic operations for Montreal-based shipping company Fednav.Press him a bit and he’ll tick off some things that are there: “A few whales, loads of birds, the odd seal.”Way north of 60: How autonomous car testing above the Arctic Circle could help CanadaExposed in the north: Canada falls behind in developing the ArcticBut four years after the icebreaker Nunavik hauled a belly full of nickel from Deception Bay, Que., to Bayuquan, China — becoming the first unescorted cargo ship to cross the Northwest Passage — what still grabs Keane most about Canada’s Arctic sea route is its emptiness.“On that route we never saw another ship honestly, never crossed within hailing distance of anyone for the seven or eight days until we got to the Western Arctic,” he said. “That was something.”Some believe that emptiness could be short-lived as global warming causes summer ice to recede and journeys such as Keane’s stoke enthusiasm about the Arctic’s potential as a new frontier for maritime trade.The Nunavik at Deception Bay: Four years the icebreaker hauled a belly full of nickel from Deception Bay, Que., to Bayuquan, China — becoming the first unescorted cargo ship to cross the Northwest Passage. 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