Saint Mary’s senior education majors transition into student teaching


first_imgSenior education majors at Saint Mary’s are beginning their transition into student teaching this week. The students will begin teaching at local elementary and secondary schools and will work on their portfolios, lesson plans and testing.Maeve Sullivan is an elementary education major with a minor in mild intervention which, she said, consists of “helping students who have mild cognitive or physical disabilities.” “Education is becoming more inclusive to those who are cognitively and physically disabled, and mild intervention is why I got into education,” she said. “Indiana has mild, moderate and severe categories of [educational] intervention.”Samantha Allen said she has always wanted to be a teacher and is glad to be teaching kindergarten this semester. “I really enjoy having students learn how to tie their shoes,” she said. “It’s such a small thing that people don’t realize they learned at one point, and the students feel so overwhelmed at the beginning — to the point of tears — and it’s so sad but a little bit funny. I teach them the steps, and then we go over the steps each time — shoes come untied every five minutes, so there’s always a learning opportunity. It’s truly the joy of my day. They know I’m the teacher who will call them out on their shoe-tying.”Allen said most students began teaching Tuesday. “I have eight full weeks in a general classroom and then seven weeks in an English-as-a-second-language classroom,” she said.  Although she initially came to Saint Mary’s to be a nursing major, Sullivan said she easily made the switch to education, as the two have similar philosophies. “Nursing and education really bring in people who serve others and want to make a difference in the lives of others,” she said. “I’m Catholic, so serving others has been a huge driving force for me.”Sullivan said their semester began with a seminar discussing the transition, including the necessary exams and portfolios. “We had an introduction into our portfolios, which are where we compile student work and lesson plans from different content areas,” she said. “They’re a huge part of the student teaching process.”Education majors have regular assessments that consist of testing and teaching lessons to the students, Allen said. “We have to do an assessment cycle where we have to give a pretest and then teach a lesson and then give another test until we give them a final test,” she said. “That’s the minimum requirement.” Saint Mary’s has given Sullivan the opportunity to encounter real-life experiences as a teacher, she said. “Saint Mary’s has put me in so many different types of schools with different types of students and in different areas of South Bend,” she said. “They’ve really allowed us to come into contact with some of the things we’ll see as teachers so that we’ll have already learned how to respond to them.” Allen said the College expects the best from its education majors.“Saint Mary’s is very extensive about what they require of education majors in order to best prepare us,” she said. “In the moment, it seems very overwhelming, but they’re so supportive and encouraging. They want the best for you, and they expect the best from you.”Sullivan is worried her penchant for perfection will cause her to overestimate and exhaust herself, she said. “I’m a perfectionist, so a fear of mine is knowing you can only do so much on your end as a teacher,” she said. “One has to understand that there is human limitation — there’s only so much you can do as a teacher. You have to teach and they have to learn, and that child’s future is literally in your hands.”Allen’s goal is to create a productive and healthy classroom environment, she said. “I’m working on classroom management, which is learning how to best de-escalate any situation or how to be the one in charge but still have fun and have students enjoy learning,” she said.  Allen said she hopes those who want to become teachers are passionate about teaching and are not just teaching as a backup plan.  “I think people who feel a passion towards education and lifelong learning are people who would really benefit from going into education,” she said. “I hope that people teach from a place of love and not from a place of desperation.”Sullivan said her goal for the semester is to get to know her class personally and academically. “I’ve gotten all the tools from Saint Mary’s, so I’m excited to see what I can do and also surprise myself a little, too,” she said. Tags: education, learning, Saint Mary’s education major, student teachinglast_img read more

Single-Engine Plane Crashes In Syosset, 3 Dead


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Christopher Twarowski, Rashed Mian and Michael ConfortiA single-engine plane crashed in Syosset Tuesday afternoon, killing its three occupants, sending nearby school children and faculty scrambling for cover, and drawing local first responders to the scene in and around Cold Spring Road. Students reported hearing a loud explosion and seeing debris falling from the sky in the vicinity of Syosset High School and South Woods Middle School.The FAA confirmed the aircraft as a Beech BE35, which crashed at 3:39 p.m. on its way to Robertson Field in Plainville, CT from Myrtle Beach, SC.A Nassau County police spokesperson at the scene described a large debris field and potential damage to nearby homes. Police and county officials did not elaborate on a probable cause of the accident.The Syosset School District sent an automated message around 4 p.m. informing parents that an incident had occurred at approximately 3:40 p.m. and that police were requesting South Woods Middle School, Berry Hill Elementary School and Syosset High School personnel and children to remain indoors and that parents delay coming to the school until further notice.Syosset Fire Department was searching the area and recovering and securing debris. Adjacent roads to the crash site were closed.Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano, on the scene, called the accident “tragic,” confirming that all three passengers had been killed, and that the pilot of the doomed craft had sent out a “mayday” that was received at Republic Airport in Farmingdale.He added that the aircraft could hold up to seven passengers.Lisa DeVito, who lives on Cold Spring Road, told the Press at the scene that she heard a “buzz like a zzzzz—and then boom!“But it didn’t sound like an explosion,” she added, rather it “sounded like they dropped a tree trunk.”DeVito said she observed what appeared to be a dead body in the middle of a street adjacent to her home, but did not see any debris nearby.Jeanine DeStefani, another nearby resident, said she received calls from her two children asking whether she was okay. Her seventh-grader, who attends South Woods Middle School, was at lacrosse practice when the incident occurred and told her he saw debris falling from the sky.“They heard a pop,” she said.The FAA will investigate the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause, said the agency.last_img read more

Stanislav Silin, Altenar: Defying regulatory challenges to hit 2019 high notes


first_img UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Global Gaming adds sportsbook extension to Ninja property August 25, 2020 Stanislav Silin, CEO at Altenar, reflects on a successful year for the sportsbook software provider, which saw it obtain key licences with the Malta Gaming Authority (MGA) and UK Gambling Commission (UKGC), and defy challenging conditions in both Italy and Sweden to launch four regulated customers across the two markets.SBC: What are the key highlights for Altenar from 2019?SS: Without revealing the numbers, I can say that we’ve done quite well, and reached what we had planned and even hoped for in 2019. This year has seen us obtain both an MGA B2B licence in Malta, and a UKGC provider licence. We’ve also obtained several software approvals, amongst which there is Italy and Sweden, where we have successfully launched four regulated customers despite both territories being quite challenging markets for sports betting. Additionally, we’ve just launched our sportsbook product in a retail environment, where we partnered with a lottery and betting operator in Jamaica. Our team has worked very hard, and everyone feels pleased with the results.SBC: You mention these four new regulated customers; how important is finding the right internal balance between chasing new clients and developing new products for existing clients? SS: There is certainly a balance to strike. We are still actively seeking new customers, but we also have a number of interesting internal projects that are focused on helping our existing customers grow. This strategy has, in the past, worked brilliantly with Wplay.co, and we hope to invest in some more effort in that direction. After all, it’s a lot more rewarding to help existing customers grow, rather than pursue contractual minimums and cycle new leads.SBC: As a technology partner, what is the reputation you crave amongst your clients?SS: We want to be known as a trusted provider of choice for sports betting operators, that not only delivers a flexible, stable and compliant software, but does not compete in the B2C space with operators it offers services to. We will, therefore, never pose the threat of competition with our own clients.We present ourselves as a company that is increasingly gaining a reputation as a reliable technology partner that our customers can trust through stability of our service, flexibility in our approach, and through software that holds a variety of B2B licences and regulatory approvals. Submit Share Soft2Bet continues new market drive with Irokobet launch August 26, 2020 Related Articles StumbleUpon Sharelast_img read more