This is what $3 million will get you in Brisbane: a luxury riverfront home “like a penthouse suite”


first_imgThis riverfront home at 65 Brisbane Corso, Fairfield, has sold for $3.045m. Picture: realestate.com.auThe house was designed by its previous owners — an architect and his wife — who bought the property with an existing 1950s house and completely renovated and extended it.It was given the full designer treatment — from the Ralph Lauren pendant lights and Murano glass chandeliers to the European oak flooring and Carara marble finishes.The bedrooms feature Italian walk-in-robes and floating entertainment units and are lined with decadent wallpaper. This riverfront home at 65 Brisbane Corso, Fairfield, has sold for $3.045m. Picture: realestate.com.auThe two storey house is on an 850 sqm block at 65 Brisbane Corso, Fairfield, surrounded by million dollar homes in the suburb’s best street.Jason Adcock of Adcock Prestige negotiated the sale of the property for $3.045 million to a local buyer looking to upgrade in the area. “The level of finish inside is just total six star,” Mr Adcock said.“It’s like something out of a penthouse suite at the Four Seasons.”More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home4 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor4 hours agoMr Adcock said the property sold in six weeks after attracting multiple offers.“I think it represented very good value for what you got,” he said. This riverfront home at 65 Brisbane Corso, Fairfield, has sold for $3.045m. Picture: realestate.com.auTALK about bang for your buck. No wonder Queensland’s southern cousins are flocking to Brisbane. You’d be lucky to get a shoebox on the water for $3 million in Sydney, but look what it will get you in Brisbane: a designer house with four bedrooms, three bathrooms, absolute river frontage — and your own personal jetty.Plus, it’s only four kilometres from Brisbane’s CBD.center_img This riverfront home at 65 Brisbane Corso, Fairfield, has sold for $3.045m. Picture: realestate.com.auBut wait until you see the kitchen. It has not one, but three, integrated Miele ovens, three integrated dishwashers, an Italian gas cooktop, an ‘Insinkerator’ and a marble island bench. Then there’s the landscaped backyard and gardens featuring an ironbark timber patio. Oh, and the property comes with approved plans for an inground pool.The property’s last recorded transaction was for $1.79 million in 2015.The median house price in Fairfield is $675,000.last_img read more

The strata by-laws all Cairns unit occupiers have to know


first_imgDecorating indoors can be subject to strata by-laws.He said owners and tenants in strata properties had to know their scheme’s by-laws inside and out. “But, unfortunately, there are many instances of residents taking actions that are in breach of the by-laws,” he said.More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns2 days ago“We had a report of a unit owner concreting their courtyard then having to jack hammer it all up as they didn’t have approval for the works. The resident previously lived in a house with only council regulations applying and was not aware he could not make this type of alteration to his courtyard without first seeking approval as stipulated within the scheme by-laws.” Mr Mifsud said even changes to the inside of the unit could be risky without checking the property’s strata by-laws. “Even changing the curtains can be an issue that causes a breach in a strata scheme. There can be by-laws that specify light backed curtains should only be installed in particular windows,” he said. “Similarly, making unauthorised changes to blinds can be a problem, while the same situation can arise with window tinting.” Apartment blocks across the city are subject to their own strata by-laws. PICTURE: ANNA ROGERSSTRATA management is meant to create harmony across a townhouse or apartment block, but not sticking to the rules can land owners and tenants in hot water. Archers the Strata Professionals partner Grant Mifsud said even the wrong choice of curtains could result in costly consequences. “As a tenant or owner within a strata property, it’s important to be aware of the things you can and can’t do in your strata scheme,” he said.“Strata schemes have by-laws which regulate common property to help maintain peace and harmony within the community and also to ensure residents can live safely and in an orderly fashion protecting the value of their properties.” Swimming pools are a common cause for contention in apartments and units.The strata expert said common areas like swimming pools were not only strata by-law landmines, but could also raise tension between neighbours. “Some residents treat the pool like it’s their own private resort when in fact it is a shared area which can have strict rules such as ensuring children using the pool are supervised by an adult, for both safety and harmony,” he said. He said other common sources of strata-scheme disputes could involve pets, parking, parties, passive smoking, hanging laundry from the balcony as well as the behaviour of visitors.“Tenants and owners should brief their visitors about the accepted behaviour inside the strata property, particularly when holding any gatherings and be mindful of the other occupants’ peaceful enjoyment of their home,” he said.“To maintain a harmonious, friendly and comfortable atmosphere in a strata property, it’s always good to familiarise yourself with your strata scheme by-laws and play within the rules.”last_img read more