Delmar H. “Hoot” Rumsey


first_imgDelmar Harry “Hoot” Rumsey, 93, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Thursday June 7, 2018 in Milan, Indiana.Delmar was born June 6, 1925 in Aurora, Indiana, son of the late Clarence and Della (Robbins) Rumsey.He served his country as a member of the United States Navy during WWII.He worked as a farmer, mechanic, and drove a school bus for South Dearborn Community Schools for over 20 years.Hoot was a member of the Holman Christian Union Church, and a member of the Moores Hill American Legion. He enjoyed being a mechanic, and working on the farm.He is survived by children, Angela Kay Turner of Milan, IN, Teresa Ann Martin of Versailles, IN, Robert William Rumsey of Aurora, IN, Rodney Gene Rumsey of Aurora, IN., sisters, Betty Seasongood of Connersville, IN. and Ada Courter of Indianapolis, IN; 13 grandchildren and 25 plus great grandchildren.He was preceded in death by his parents, his loving wife of almost 60 years, Barbara J. (Hayhurst) Rumsey; daughter, Sue Vornheder, sons, Tony and Richard Rumsey; brothers, Louis Rumsey, Francis “Gene” Rumsey and a sister, Evelyn Courter.Friends will be received Monday, June 11, 2018 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm at Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held Tuesday at 11:00 am at Holman Christian Union Church, 12020 N. Hogan Road, Aurora, Indiana with Pastor Mike Addison officiating.Interment will follow in the Hogan Hill Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana. Military graveside services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions may be made to the Relay for Life, Holman Christian Union Church or Hogan Hill Cemetery. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

Professor uses Afro-Latina identity to foster community at Price school, South LA


first_imgAdjunct professor La Mikia Castillo said it can be hard to find a space where she “fits in,” due to her Afro-Latina identity. Castillo works to bridge her two communities, since she thinks members of both face similar issues. (Sarah Johnson| Daily Trojan)Born and raised in South L.A., alumna and adjunct professor La Mikia Castillo strives to make a difference in communities in need by focusing on public policy and urban planning.“I grew up in a low-income community,” Castillo said. “It wasn’t until that I got to college when I realized that my community didn’t have access to the same resources as other communities.”Castillo received her bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego, where she said she noticed a stark contrast in access to resources among her peers.“When I began to see the disparities between what I had access to and what my friends from home had access to versus my peers in college, I realized that there was something wrong there and I wanted to change it,” she said. In college, Castillo learned that communities looked the way they do due to policies implemented by policymakers and urban planners, who decide which areas certain populations will be placed in. “I became a community organizer because I really wanted to work on organizing community members to learn what I had learned in college and use that information to change the community, to actually advocate for policies that would be positive for us,” Castillo said.As a graduate student at the Price School of Public Policy, Castillo founded the Black Student Association at Price after noticing that there was a need for black students to speak about issues that impact the black community. In addition, she was a board member of the Latino Student Association at Price.“[These groups] were very meaningful for me because as a person who identifies as black and Latina, sometimes it’s hard to find the space where I feel like I fit in, where I can be my whole self,” Castillo said. “I’ve always been involved in black student organizations and Latinx student organizations and then act as a bridge between them because I think that issues our communities face are so similar, that it makes sense for us to overlap and work together to address them through policy and planning,” Castillo recently worked as a national director at the National Foster Institute, where she worked on local, state and federal child welfare policies. She also helped empower foster youth by helping them understand how policy is created.  “I would bring foster youth from across the country to Washington D.C. to meet with their Congress members,” Castillo said. “They would shadow them to learn about how Congress works, and they would then tell their own personal stories about what their experiences were like in the foster care system … They would also make recommendations for how they can address those challenges through policy.” Currently, Castillo teaches both of Price’s undergraduate social innovation and graduate social context courses at Price. In both classes, Castillo allows students to work together to solve challenges through social innovations and hands-on activities. “I know that there’s so much for [students] to contribute to the class, so if you would like to lead a session in the class, I want you to take the lead on that,” Castillo said. “I absolutely love when students take that opportunity to lead, and I think it helps them feel empowered that you have something to bring and something to offer, and your peers can learn from you as well.”This story is part of a mini-series highlighting Latinos at USC. It ran every week during Hispanic Heritage Month, which ended Oct. 15.last_img read more

Federer donates almost a million euros to help Switzerland


first_imgSport has turned to struggle the coronavirus disaster, which has already left greater than 400,000 contaminated worldwide, lots of them within the international locations of Europe with Italy and Spain as essentially the most affected.The coronavirus has additionally reached Switzerland, the place the federal government has decreed quarantine after greater than 10,000 infections and 135 deaths.. Confronted with this example, the nation’s highest ambassador wished to take a step ahead to get entangled within the struggle in opposition to the virus. This Wednesday Roger Federer introduced by way of social networks that he and his spouse Mirka Vavrinec have determined to donate one million Swiss francs (943,000 euros) to help the neediest households within the nation by way of a assertion written in English, German and French. “These are difficult occasions for everybody and nobody ought to be left behind. Mirka and I’ve determined to donate one million Swiss francs to essentially the most susceptible households in Switzerland. Our contribution is the start. We hope that others will be part of us to help households in want. Collectively we’ll overcome this disaster! Keep wholesome!“Federer stated. Yet another instance that demonstrates the magnificence of the Swiss each on and off the tennis courts.last_img read more

Judge dismisses challenges to oil lease sales in the National Petroleum ReserveAlaska


first_imgTwo oil lease sales held in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska were at stake in the case, one held under the Obama administration in 2016 and the other held under the Trump administration . (Photo by Bob Wick, courtesy BLM)A federal judge in Anchorage has dismissed two lawsuits brought by environmental groups against the Trump administration challenging oil lease sales in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, or NPR-A.Environmental groups had argued the federal Bureau of Land Management did not do an adequate environmental review before it held oil lease sales in 2016 and 2017.In one of the lawsuits, the groups also argued the federal government failed to fully consider how oil produced in the 23-million acre Reserve could worsen climate change.The federal government argued it did complete an extensive environmental review for oil leasing in the Reserve under the Obama administration, as part of a management plan for NPR-A finalized in 2013. The Trump administration is currently considering an overhaul of that management plan.District Court judge Sharon Gleason ruled that in one case, the groups missed the time window to challenge the Obama-era management plan for NPR-A, which was finalized in 2013. In the other, Gleason wrote in her decision that the groups were wrong to ask for an entirely new environmental review for the 2017 oil lease sale.ConocoPhillips, the oil company that holds the most leases in NPR-A, intervened in the case.Attorneys for the environmental groups said they may appeal the ruling.last_img read more