Upbeat Weld plots Arc Eagle route


first_img Press Association Having missed the chance to prove himself against dual Derby winner Australia and the rest of his age group in last season’s Classics due to injury, the son of High Chaparral is now beginning to fulfil his potential. He won the Prince of Wales’s Stakes on his seasonal debut at Royal Ascot and Weld hopes the four-year-old ends up in the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe. “Unfortunately, he got a stress fracture of his tibia when he was working exceptionally well (last year) and that delayed his entire late spring and summer campaign,” the Rosewell handler told At The Races. “He didn’t reappear until September, when he won a nice Group race at Leopardstown, and it was then unfortunate on Champions Day at Ascot that he had to run on very heavy ground. “He ran such an excellent race just to be beaten. “We’re always expecting better. I had a hold-up with him just before he won at Royal Ascot, where I thought he put up an excellent performance in winning the Prince of Wales’s. “It was lovely to win a nice Group One with him at Royal Ascot but I think there’s more to come and, with luck, he can do better in the autumn. “I’m not certain what his best trip is. He’s very good at 10 furlongs as he has a lot of pace, but I believe he can carry it out over a mile and a half. “He’s relaxed and well balanced and hopefully he’ll be able to run in the Arc.” center_img Dermot Weld believes Free Eagle can be just as effective over a mile and a half as he is over 10 furlongs.last_img read more

Professor uses Afro-Latina identity to foster community at Price school, South LA


first_imgAdjunct professor La Mikia Castillo said it can be hard to find a space where she “fits in,” due to her Afro-Latina identity. Castillo works to bridge her two communities, since she thinks members of both face similar issues. (Sarah Johnson| Daily Trojan)Born and raised in South L.A., alumna and adjunct professor La Mikia Castillo strives to make a difference in communities in need by focusing on public policy and urban planning.“I grew up in a low-income community,” Castillo said. “It wasn’t until that I got to college when I realized that my community didn’t have access to the same resources as other communities.”Castillo received her bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego, where she said she noticed a stark contrast in access to resources among her peers.“When I began to see the disparities between what I had access to and what my friends from home had access to versus my peers in college, I realized that there was something wrong there and I wanted to change it,” she said. In college, Castillo learned that communities looked the way they do due to policies implemented by policymakers and urban planners, who decide which areas certain populations will be placed in. “I became a community organizer because I really wanted to work on organizing community members to learn what I had learned in college and use that information to change the community, to actually advocate for policies that would be positive for us,” Castillo said.As a graduate student at the Price School of Public Policy, Castillo founded the Black Student Association at Price after noticing that there was a need for black students to speak about issues that impact the black community. In addition, she was a board member of the Latino Student Association at Price.“[These groups] were very meaningful for me because as a person who identifies as black and Latina, sometimes it’s hard to find the space where I feel like I fit in, where I can be my whole self,” Castillo said. “I’ve always been involved in black student organizations and Latinx student organizations and then act as a bridge between them because I think that issues our communities face are so similar, that it makes sense for us to overlap and work together to address them through policy and planning,” Castillo recently worked as a national director at the National Foster Institute, where she worked on local, state and federal child welfare policies. She also helped empower foster youth by helping them understand how policy is created.  “I would bring foster youth from across the country to Washington D.C. to meet with their Congress members,” Castillo said. “They would shadow them to learn about how Congress works, and they would then tell their own personal stories about what their experiences were like in the foster care system … They would also make recommendations for how they can address those challenges through policy.” Currently, Castillo teaches both of Price’s undergraduate social innovation and graduate social context courses at Price. In both classes, Castillo allows students to work together to solve challenges through social innovations and hands-on activities. “I know that there’s so much for [students] to contribute to the class, so if you would like to lead a session in the class, I want you to take the lead on that,” Castillo said. “I absolutely love when students take that opportunity to lead, and I think it helps them feel empowered that you have something to bring and something to offer, and your peers can learn from you as well.”This story is part of a mini-series highlighting Latinos at USC. It ran every week during Hispanic Heritage Month, which ended Oct. 15.last_img read more

Joe Maddon wants Angels players to relax amid early slump


first_imgANAHEIM — In past years Joe Maddon would have had his team do American Legion Week — minimal pregame work, just show up and play — to help the players relax in the dog days of August.Except the dog days came early this season.The Angels have started this season in just the type of funk for which Maddon usually prescribes cutting back on work. It’s a little more tricky, however, to abandon batting practice when players are still trying to get their timing in the shortened season.While Maddon said he won’t do full-scale American Legion Week, he nonetheless would like to see his players work a little less to relieve some of the pressure of the slow start. Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield “Right now the theme I’m trying to get across is do less to get more,” Maddon said before Monday’s game. “There’s nobody that can swing more than our guys swing or look at more video or care more or look at more data. Nobody. It’s impossible. But that’s not always the route back. If it was that easy, every team would have a bunch of .300 hitters with an .850 OPS.“You’ve got to find what works for you, and I think a lot of times what works, what they’re afraid to try, is less. Try easier.”The Angels have done particularly badly in clutch situations lately. Over the previous eight games they hit .137 with runners in scoring position, the worst average in the majors over that span.SUPPORTING ADELLJo Adell was back in the lineup, hitting ninth, a day after he made a four-base error and went hitless in four at-bats, with four strikeouts. Maddon said he personally did some extra work with Adell on defense before Monday’s game.As far as his offense — Adell was 2 for 15 with nine strikeouts — Maddon said they’re trying not to give him too much to think about. “Just supporting him,” Maddon said. “That was a tough game yesterday and I thought he handled it well. He’s a sharp kid. He listens well. Knows he doesn’t know everything. He has all the right stuff to be great. He’ll figure it out and we’ll keep working through it.”Regarding the error, the Texas Rangers plan to appeal the decision that charged Adell with a rare four-base error on the ball that Nick Solak hit on Sunday, general manager Jon Daniels told reporters in Texas.Solak’s drive hit Adell’s glove and bounced over the right field fence. The official scorer initially called it a homer but then, after consultation with the Elias Sports Bureau, changed it to a four-base error.SIMMONS UPDATEAndrelton Simmons, who is out with a sprained ankle, is accelerating his progress toward a return.“He’s getting close,” Maddon said. “He’s taking BP on the field, which puts him in line for a return. So he’s on the horizon.”Maddon did not have a more specific timetable for Simmons, who has been out since getting hurt on July 27. Simmons spoke to reporters a few days after the injury and it wasn’t as bad as a similar injury that cost him five weeks in 2019.ALSOFor the second day in a row, Maddon moved Mike Trout from his familiar No. 2 spot into the No. 3 spot. Generally the Angels have preferred Trout hit second because he came to the plate more often and they didn’t have two high on-base players to set the table for him, but Maddon feels that David Fletcher and Tommy La Stella are currently swinging the bat well enough that they can both create opportunities for Trout…The Angels activated Jose Suarez, who had been on the injured list for undisclosed reasons, and optioned him to the alternate site in Long Beach, where he had been working out for a couple weeks. The Angels also cleared a spot on the 40-man roster by designating Jose Rodriguez for assignment.Related Articleslast_img read more