Black & Gold: Los Angeles’ soccer market is missing a professional women’s team


first_imgAs women’s soccer continues to gain traction in the United States, expansion of the National Women’s Soccer League appears inevitable. Within the last six years, the NWSL has welcomed three new teams — the Houston Dash in 2014, Orlando Pride in 2016 and Utah Royals FC in 2018 — affiliated with their city’s respective MLS team. It’s time for Los Angeles to finally have an NWSL team of its own. While some criticized Hamm for investing in a men’s team before a women’s team, her leadership and passion for the women’s game will position her at the forefront of such a decision.  There is no NWSL team in Los Angeles just yet, but that does not mean we should just sit, tweet “#BringNWSLtoLA” and wait. Follow the league, watch the games and help women’s soccer grow. LAFC’s success has garnered the brand much excitement in a short amount of time. In just two years, the club has already become a heavy favorite to win the MLS cup. Given LAFC’s early success, it’s not unreasonable to imagine the same results for a new NWSL team in LA. Southern California is a soccer hotbed. Los Angeles has two MLS teams because the soccer market in L.A. has the capacity to provide both with many fans. The area’s role in women’s soccer specifically is also evident. Southern California has produced many talented female soccer players who went on to play for different national and professional teams. Two stars from the USWNT’s World Cup-winning roster this summer, Alex Morgan and Christen Press, hailed from SoCal. Many players have also benefited from the dominant youth clubs and successful college programs right here at USC and across town at UCLA.  Johannah Suegay is a sophomore writing about LAFC. Her column, “Black & Gold,” runs every other Thursday. Bringing the NWSL to L.A. would give women’s soccer the representation it deserves in an area that needs it. Seeing strong, athletic women pursue their passions despite countless obstacles empowers everyone, from young girls who just picked up their first sport to high school and college players who are discouraged by the inequality they’ve seen in women’s sports. The other most populous cities in the United States — New York, Houston and Chicago — all have NWSL teams. Given such widespread representation, it is baffling that Los Angeles is still without a team in the league. By not investing in an L.A. team, the NWSL is missing out on a large market. Just as LAFC received early support before the team was even formed, many soccer fans have shown their enthusiasm about bringing the NWSL to L.A. NWSL’s social media accounts are constantly bombarded with questions and petitions for LAFC to invest in a women’s team.  So many groups of people are impacted by or connected to this sport in some way or simply drawn in by the confidence and resilience of the athletes. Bringing women’s soccer to L.A. will challenge our community to break gender stereotypes and uplift women everywhere. Hamm is the only woman on the ownership team and understands both the experiences female athletes face and the necessity for women’s soccer to grow. If LAFC pursues this opportunity, I’m confident that she will lead the charge in creating a world-class environment for women’s soccer. Ever since the ownership group of the Los Angeles Football Club was announced, there have been whispers about expanding to the NWSL. Especially with the inclusion of ex-USWNT star Mia Hamm in the star-studded ownership team, many expected the discussion of investing in a women’s team to arise early.  Excitement about bringing the NWSL to L.A. has spread to Banc of California Stadium. At the last few LAFC home games, LAFC’s loyal supporter union, the 3252, flew banners and flags with the NWSL logo saying “Bring NWSL to LA.”last_img read more

Oakland coach Ryan Christenson apologises after “unintentional” Nazi salute gesture


first_img SUBSCRIBE TO US Written By First Published: 8th August, 2020 16:49 IST Last Updated: 8th August, 2020 16:49 IST Oakland Coach Ryan Christenson Apologises After “unintentional” Nazi Salute Gesture Oakland coach Ryan Christenson faced heavy criticism from fans after he unintentionally did a Nazi salute after Thursday’s win 6-4 win over the Rangers. 8 months ago Tannehill’s playoff debut comes against the Patriots’ Brady The Oakland A’s released a similar statement where they defended their bench coach for his actions. They noted that neither the coach nor the organisation supports or condones such offensive gestures or the “racist sentiment behind them.” “We are deeply sorry that this happened on our playing field,” the Athletics wrote. Also Read | Tigers Outslug Pirates 17-13 In 11 Innings After LayoffRyan Christenson Nazi salute video spurs social media backlash for A’s coachAfter the video first appeared on social media, it quickly became a hot talking point, with fans demanding Christenson should be fired by the MLB for his racist gesture. For most fans, the Oakland coach’s apology was barely a retribution for the damages already occurred.  Sujay Chakraborty Ryan Christenson, a former MLB player himself, has been working as the bench coach at the Athletics under manager Bob Melvin since the 2018 MLB season. He played six seasons in Major League Baseball between 1998 and 2003, including three with the Athletics. After retiring, Christenson began managing Oakland Athletics’ minor league farm system before his call-up to the big league. Also Read | Murphy Drives In 4, Rockies Keep Rolling, Beat M’s 8-4Also Read | Padres Beat Dbacks 3-0 Behind Davies, Three Solo Homers(Image Credits: Oakland Athletic Twitter Handle, MLB Official Website) Christenson has since issued an official apology, where he admitted to having made a mistake by greeting players with an offensive gesture. The 46-year-old, however, insisted it was not his intent to make that gesture and that his actions were purely “unintentional.” Christenson explained the offensive gesture was a result of him adapting his postgame celebrations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “I made a mistake and will not deny it. Today in the dugout I greeted players with a gesture that was offensive,” Christenson said in the statement. “In the world today of COVID, I adapted our elbow bump, which we do after wins, to create some distance with the players. My gesture unintentionally resulted in a racist and horrible salute that I do not believe in. What I did was unacceptable and I deeply apologize.” Also Read | Trout Homers Again On Birthday, But Angels Fall To Rangers FOLLOW US LIVE TV COMMENT Oakland Athletics bench coach Ryan Christenson was subject to a major backlash from fans after he was captured gesturing with a Nazi salute following the Athletics’ 6-4 win over Texas Rangers on Thursday. Christenson was caught raising a stiff arm above his head – similar to that of a Nazi salute – before he elbow bumped his players during the postgame celebration.  WE RECOMMEND WATCH US LIVElast_img read more