1999 World Cup Reunion


first_imgTouch Football Australia (TFA) is proud to announce a reunion of the World Champion Australian Representatives from the 1999 World Cup. The reunion will be held in conjunction with the upcoming Trans Tasman series to be held from the 24th – 26th April 2009 in Wollongong, NSW. It has been 10 years since the very successful 1999 World Cup campaign which was held in Sydney, and in celebration of a Trans Tasman Series coming to Australia for the first time in 6 years. It is a great opportunity to celebrate the achievements of both the present players and those who have pulled on the green and gold before them.  Since the release of the initial information, there has been expressed interest from other past Australian Representatives from earlier and since campaigns who would also like to be included. TFA extends a warm invitation not only specifically to the 1999 World Cup members, but also any member of past representative teams from any campaign to attend and celebrate the current Australian Contingent.We will provide a special reunion package available for members to book with TFA, which will include the Reunion VIP Cocktail Function during the Saturday Night Test Series including a 2 hour drinks package, commemorative gift and free entry to the Trans Tasman games to be held at WIN Stadium for $50 inc GST.    Reunion attendees are also welcome to attend the ANZAC Ceremony if they wish and can also purchase tickets to attend the Australian Team Function on the Sunday early afternoon as well as the Thursday Trans Tasman Civic Reception dinner.  While hosting the Trans Tasman Series here in Australia, TFA are focused on the Australian aspects of the 1999 World Cup, but are also extending an open invitation to other participants of the event including Federation of International Touch Referees, New Zealand Team Members and participants from any other Nation.  We also extend a warm invitation to the friends/ family and partners of the 1999 World Cup who are also permitted to purchase Reunion Tickets.At this early stage of promotion we have had exciting feedback that both the Women’s Open and Men’s Open teams from the 1999 Campaign will have the majority of their members in attendance.     To arrange the purchase of reunion tickets, and get on the emailing list for more information, like ‘reunion friendly accommodation’, please contact Chrissy Brockway on 02 6212 2800 and chrissy.brockway@austouch.com.au   Related Filesflyer-pdflast_img read more

10 months agoCardiff confident landing Liverpool fullback Clyne – thanks to Warnock


first_imgCardiff confident landing Liverpool fullback Clyne – thanks to Warnockby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCardiff City are chasing Liverpool fullback Nathaniel Clyne.The Mirror says Cardiff are confident of winning the race to sign Clyne on loan.The 27-year-old has been back on the scene at Anfield in recent weeks but will move down the pecking order again when Joe Gomez returns to fitness.Fulham and Leicester have also shown an interest in taking the right-back next month.But Bluebirds boss Neil Warnock is hopeful that his past association with Clyne — the pair worked together at Crystal Palace — will give him the edge. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

18 days agoHarry Winks: Spurs players behind the manager


first_imgHarry Winks: Spurs players behind the managerby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveHarry Winks says Tottenham Hotspur’s squad are sticking by Mauricio Pochettino.The Argentine is under pressure to keep his job after Saturday’s loss to Brighton, leaving the club with a record of three wins from 11 games this season.But Winks believes Pochettino has the complete support of his playing squad.”He’s our manager. He’s been fantastic ever since he’s been at the club and taken the club to new heights,” Winks said.”At the moment we are going through a bit of a rough patch. That happens in football, every club goes through it.”It’s important we stand up as men and get through these dark times, and hopefully we can get back to playing well and winning as much as we can.”In the last six years we have come such a long way, we have become a title-challenging side. But we haven’t shown it this season, we have only shown it in parts.”In certain games we have played really well but for the majority of this season we haven’t shown what we are about.”It’s important we look back on it and reflect so realise it’s not been good enough, no excuses. The only way we can put it right is back in training and the next match.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

In the news today Aug 27


first_imgFour stories in the news for Tuesday, Aug. 27———MIDDLE-CLASS B.C. GANGS BREAK FROM HISTORYA former member of the Hells Angels says the young men joining gangs today are facing much higher stakes than he did. Joe Calendino began turning his life around after being busted selling $10 worth of crack cocaine to an undercover cop. But he says the gang landscape has shifted so dramatically in the decade since that today’s youth won’t have the same second chance. He says he and his friends got in fights when he was growing up and started getting involved with drugs, but guns were never involved. When Canada’s homicide rate reached 660 in 2017 — the highest in almost a decade — Statistics Canada attributed part of the spike to gang-related violence and shootings, singling out British Columbia as a hot spot.———B.C. PLEASED WITH OKLAHOMA RULING IN OPIOIDS CASEBritish Columbia’s attorney general says he is pleased with the findings of a court in Oklahoma that found Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiaries helped fuel the state’s opioid crisis as it ordered the company to pay US $572 million, more than twice the amount another drug manufacturer agreed to pay in a settlement. The province filed a proposed class-action lawsuit a year ago against dozens of pharmaceutical companies in a bid to recoup the health-care costs associated with opioid addiction. The untested suit alleges the companies falsely marketed opioids as less addictive than other pain drugs and helped trigger an overdose crisis that has killed thousands since OxyContin was introduced to the Canadian market in 1996.———WASTEWATER TESTS REVEAL CANADIANS’ DRUG USEA pilot project that analyzed wastewater in five major urban centres suggests Canadians’ may use drugs differently depending on which city they call home. For example, the analysis by Statistics Canada showed cannabis levels are much higher in Montreal and Halifax than in Toronto, Vancouver and Edmonton. But the findings reported Monday showed methamphetamine levels were significantly higher in the latter two cities. Cocaine use, on the other hand, appeared more evenly distributed across the cities, averaging 340 grams per million people per week. To get results, the agency collected wastewater samples from treatment plants in each of the five major cities between March 2018 and February 2019 and tested them for traces of cannabis and a dozen other drugs. ———SOME FISH PASSING RIVER BLOCKAGE: FISHERIES DEPARTMENTAuthorities dealing with a massive landslide in British Columbia’s Fraser River say they’ve successfully helped thousands of salmon migrate north of the site, but millions of fish remain threatened by the obstruction. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the provincial government and local First Nations set up a team to lead the response to the slide near Big Bar, north of Lillooet, after it was discovered in late June. The team says fish counting data shows some chinook salmon have been able to swim past the slide using the channels the team has created with large rock manipulation and blasting. It says as of last Tuesday, a rough estimate of 6,700 salmon have passed through the slide on their own.———ALSO IN THE NEWS:— Environment Minister Catherine McKenna will make an announcement today on the federal government’s plan to support climate action in Ontario.— Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett will make an announcement on a new collaborative fiscal policy and self-governing Indigenous governments.— The trial continues today for Alberta couple David and Collet Stephan, who are charged with failing to provide the necessaries of life in the death of their son, Ezekiel, from meningitis.— The trial continues today in Vancouver for Andrew Berry, who faces second-degree murder charges in the death of his two young daughters.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Disruptive behaviors in autistic children linked to reduced brain connectivity


first_img Source:https://news.yale.edu/2019/04/18/behavioral-disorders-kids-autism-linked-lower-brain-connectivity Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 19 2019More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.”Disruptive behaviors such as aggression, irritability, and noncompliance are common in children with autism, and are among the main reasons for psychiatric treatment and even hospitalization,” said Denis Sukhodolsky, senior author and associate professor in the Yale Child Study Center. “Yet, little is known about the biological underpinnings of behavioral problems in children with autism.”Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsThe first of its kind, the Yale study used fMRI scans conducted during an emotion perception task to compare the brain activity of autistic children who do and do not exhibit disruptive behavior. While in the scanner, the children were asked to view pictures of human faces that displayed calm or fearful expressions.During the task, the researchers found reduced connectivity between the amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex — a pathway critical to the regulation of emotion — in the brains of children who exhibit disruptive behavior as compared to the brains of children who do not. “Reduced amygdala-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity was uniquely associated with disruptive behavior but not with severity of social deficits or anxiety, suggesting a distinct brain network that could be separate from core autism symptoms,” explained Karim Ibrahim, first author and postdoctoral fellow in the Sukhodolsky lab.”This finding points to a brain mechanism of emotion dysregulation in children with autism and offers a potential biomarker for developing targeted treatments for irritability and aggression in autism,” said Sukhodolsky.last_img read more

Opioid poisoning rates higher and in a more diverse population study shows


first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 21 2019A cohort study by Stony Brook University researchers of all payer hospital data on Long Island combined with census data indicates that opioid poisoning (OP) levels almost doubled from 2010 to 2016. Additionally, the study revealed that the demographics of patients with OP appears to be shifting and becoming more diverse. The findings are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Not enough is known about the epidemiology of OP to tailor interventions to help address the growing opioid crisis in the U.S. According the National Center for Health Statistics, New York State is one of five states with the most opioid drug overdoses. The objective of the Stony Brook study is to expand understanding about OP through the use of data analytics to evaluate geographic, temporal, and socioeconomic differences of OP related hospital visits in a region of New York State with high OP rates. Related Stories’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesThrough the data analysis, Wang and colleagues found that OP hospital visit rates increased 2.5 to 2.7 fold on Long Island since 2010. OP hospital visit rates decreased for men, whites and self-pay patients but increased for Medicare payers. Communities with high OP rates had lower median home values regardless of location, higher percentages of high school graduates, were younger and more often were white patients.These findings reveal that OP is becoming more diverse by gender, age, economics and location. Historically, on a national level the highest OP rates have been among young adults (18-34) who are white male, urban dwellers, and those with lower income and non-private payers.According to Wang, the research team will engage other researchers to build a nationwide data-driven opioid epidemic research community. He said their method and findings provide a foundation to build a precision public health-based framework for opioid epidemic research through integrative spatial-temporal based analytical methods for population studies. The long-term goal of the research will also be to develop a machine learning-based framework for predicting OP risks of patients using integrative electronic health records to support clinical decisions. Source:Stony Brook University We believe our method and use of data analytics tools to identify regions and patient populations may help to focus on effective interventions. These population identification techniques can also potentially be applied to other communities anywhere in the United States to focus on interventions.”Fusheng Wang, PhD, lead author and Associate Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Informatics in the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University and in Computer Sciencelast_img read more

Air FranceKLM denies bidding for troubled Alitalia


Alitalia went into administration last May at the request of its shareholders after staff rejected job and salary cuts as part of a two-billion-euro ($2.4 billion) rescue plan The Air France-KLM group on Saturday denied it had made an offer for ailing airline Alitalia, a day after Italy’s industry minister listed it among three bidders. Alitalia, struggling to compete with low-cost European rivals, went into administration last May at the request of its shareholders after staff rejected job and salary cuts as part of a two-billion-euro ($2.4 billion) rescue plan.”Air France-KLM denies making an offer to buy Alitalia,” a statement said adding that the group “had not taken part in the process launched by Italian authorities.”On Friday, Economic Development Minister Carlo Calenda said on the La7 television channel that there were three offers: one from German airline giant Lufthansa, another from US private equity group Cerberus, and a joint EasyJet-Air France bid.”The presence of Air France is not sure and I will verify on Monday with the Alitalia administrators,” Calenda however said.According to local media reports, Lufthansa wants to lay off 2,000 employees—almost a quarter of the total on the aviation side—if its offer for Alitalia is accepted.Alitalia has 11,500 workers in total. Explore further Citation: Air France-KLM denies bidding for troubled Alitalia (2018, January 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-air-france-klm-denies-alitalia.html © 2018 AFP Italian govt mulling three offers for ailing Alitalia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

A new method for ethical data science


first_img Citation: A new method for ethical data science (2019, March 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-method-ethical-science.html A less technical way of looking at it is that people, fundamentally, are team players: they want to fit in and may find it difficult to criticise the work of their close colleagues. They might also become subject to ‘group think’ without realising it.In Wellcome Data Labs we have worked out a paired approach to Agile ethics which is intended to resolve this issue. Our proposed methodology has three steps:Embedding within Data Labs a user researcher with a background both in working as part of Agile product teams and in carrying out social sciences research. This embedded researcher will have the explicitly defined objective of testing the algorithmic models the software developers and data scientists are working on from the point of view of their possible social impact.They will adjust and develop their analysis iteratively to match the speed of the technology work and feed their emergent conclusions back to the data scientists to steer the course of their work.The embedded researcher will be paired up with another social scientist outside the team to provide an objective critique and the necessary checks and balances on their analysis.All three parts of the proposed methodology are equally important.Not embedding the researcher in the team would make it hard for them to have a close enough knowledge of what the data scientists are doing.Not iteratively retesting and rewriting their analysis of possible social impact will fail to match the rhythm of the technological development  –  the key proposed advantage of this methodology.Finally, the pairing is designed to prevent the embedded researcher risking a loss of their professional detachment and objectivity, which is a risk precisely because they are so closely embedded within the technology teams.This whole approach is an experiment in itself and we are not at all certain that it will work. However, that is exactly what makes it exciting to us. We hope it will help us become better aware of the biases being introduced by the algorithms that we develop and minimise any potential negative unintentional consequences of the tools the team produces.This is important because Wellcome, as a significant funder of scientific research, has a notable impact on the academic and health industries. And Wellcome Data Labs’ analysis feeds into Wellcome’s decision making process. Any unintended biases in the algorithms my team produces that can impact Wellcome’s decisions, could have a ripple effect on the decisions of more funders, which in turn could cascade down to secondary impacts on other industries and the wider society. We have a responsibility to get it right. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Artificial Intelligence is transforming our world, sometimes in ways that its creators did not intend. In Wellcome Data Labs we are developing a new method of applying approaches from the social sciences to the way AI algorithms are produced to solve data science problems. The goal is to avoid potential negative consequences of the algorithms by identifying them earlier in the development process.center_img Provided by Wellcome Trust There have been attempts to set out such a way of working already. An example is Catalina Butnaru’s excellent post proposing a new Agile ethics process. There is much to recommend this approach, not least that it is systematic and aligned closely in its steps to well-known steps of agile software development methodologies.However, Butnaru does not address the mechanics of how her suggested Agile ethics process could be managed. Is it the team of data scientists and engineers themselves who are responsible for following the steps? Or their product manager? Or the UX team? Or a separate team to the engineers that audits their work?We have been thinking about such questions a lot, since we are keen to test out how ethical approaches can be applied to the work of data scientists in practice and not just in theory.The key challenge we set ourselves is: how to apply a process such as Butnaru’s, or one of the other rival methodologies, in a way that measurably reduces ethical issues, like inadvertent bias, but does not reduce the energy and effectiveness of our Agile product teams?We think this can be done by encouraging social scientists to work as part of interdisciplinary teams with software developers and data scientists, adopting their agile and iterative methodologies.I have outlined some of the challenges of doing this. For example, the difficulty of getting social science researchers to work at the same speed and to the same rhythm as the software developers and data scientists. However, there is a potential template to follow by learning from the successful integration of the User Experience discipline into the software development workflows.There is an additional challenge, though. Relying on a user researcher embedded in a product team to steer that team through an Agile ethics methodology on their own introduces the risk of them losing objectivity. This is a well-known issue in ethnographic research, where there is an active tension between a researcher’s role as an impartial observer and the alternative of being an active participant. A framework for AI-powered agile project managementlast_img read more

How Can You Tell if Someone or Something Is Conscious


first_img Tam Hunt, Affiliate Guest in Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara How can you know that any animal, other human beings, or anything that seems conscious, isn’t just faking it? Does it enjoy an internal subjective experience, complete with sensations and emotions like hunger, joy, or sadness? After all, the only consciousness you can know with certainty is your own. Everything else is inference. The nature of consciousness makes it by necessity a wholly private affair. These questions are more than philosophical. As intelligent digital assistants, self-driving cars and other robots start to proliferate, are these AIs actually conscious or just seem like it? Or what about patients in comas — how can doctors know with any certainty what kind of consciousness is or is not present, and prescribe treatment accordingly? In my work, often with with psychologist Jonathan Schooler at the University of California, Santa Barbara, we’re developing a framework for thinking about the many different ways to possibly test for the presence of consciousness.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65874-tests-for-consciousness.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  There is a small but growing field looking at how to assess the presence and even quantity of consciousness in various entities. I’ve divided possible tests into three broad categories that I call the measurable correlates of consciousness. You can look for brain activity that occurs at the same time as reported subjective states. Or you can look for physical actions that seem to be accompanied by subjective states. Finally, you can look for the products of consciousness, like artwork or music, or this article I’ve written, that can be separated from the entity that created them to infer the presence — or not — of consciousness. Neural correlates of consciousness Over the last two decades, scientists have proposed various ways to probe cognition and consciousness in unresponsive patients. In such cases, there aren’t any behaviors to observe or any creative products to assess. You can check for the neural correlates of consciousness, though. What’s physically going on in the brain? Neuroimaging tools such as EEG, MEG, fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (each with their own strengths and weaknesses), are able to provide information on activity happening within the brain even in coma and vegetative patients. Cognitive neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene has identified what he calls four signatures of consciousness — specific aspects of brain activity he deems necessary for normal consciousness. He focuses on what’s known as the “P3 wave” in the dorsolateral cortex — the part of the brain behind the top of your forehead — because it seems to correlate most reliably with normal conscious states. He also focuses on long-range synchronized electric fields between different parts of the brain as another key signature of consciousness. In tests which look for these signals in vegetative and minimally conscious patients, Dehaene and his colleagues have successfully predicted which patients are most likely to regain more normal states of consciousness. Sid Kouider, another cognitive neuroscientist, has examined infants in order to assess the likelihood that very young babies are conscious. He and his team looked for specific neural signatures that go along with subjective experience in adults. They looked specifically for a certain type of brain waves, similar to the P3 wave Dehaene focuses on, that are reliable indicators of consciousness in adults. They found clear analogs of the P3 wave in the brains of babies as young as five months old. Kouider concludes — unsurprisingly — that even young babies are very likely conscious in various complex ways, such as recognizing faces. Behavioral correlates of consciousness When considering potentially conscious entities that can’t communicate directly, and that won’t allow neuroscientific measurement tools on their head (if they even have heads), it’s possible to consider physical behaviors as clues for the presence and type of consciousness. You know that a massive range of human behaviors are accompanied by conscious experience. So when you see similar behaviors in other animals or even non-animals, can you reasonably infer the presence of consciousness? For example, are cats conscious? Their brain architecture is a little different than humans’. They have very minimal prefrontal cortex, which some scientists think is the center of many higher-order activities of the human brain. But is a prefrontal cortex necessary for consciousness? Cat behavior is complex and pretty easy to map onto human behavior in many ways. Cats purr, flex their toes and snuggle when petted, in similar ways to people demonstrating pleasure when physically stimulated — minus the purrs, of course. They meow loudly for food when hungry and stop meowing when fed. They demonstrate curiosity or fear about other cats or humans with various types of body language. These and many other easily observable behaviors add up to convincing evidence for most people that cats are indeed conscious and have rich emotional lives. You can imagine looking for other familiar behaviors in a rat, or an ant or a plant — if you see things close enough to what you’d expect in conscious humans, you may credit the observed creature with a certain type of consciousness. Creative correlates of consciousness If, for whatever reason, you can’t examine neural or behavioral correlates of consciousness, maybe you can look to creative outputs for clues that would indicate consciousness. For example, when examining ancient megalithic structures such as Stonehenge, or cave paintings created as far back as 65,000 years ago, is it reasonable to assume that their creators were conscious in ways similar to us? Most people would likely say yes. You know from experience that it would take high intelligence and consciousness to produce such items today, so reasonably conclude that our ancient ancestors had similar levels of consciousness. What if explorers find obviously unnatural artifacts on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system? It will depend on the artifacts in question, but if astronauts were to find anything remotely similar to human dwellings or machinery that was clearly not human in origin, it would be reasonable to infer that the creators of these artifacts were also conscious. Closer to home, artificial intelligence has produced some pretty impressive art — impressive enough to fetch over US$400,000 in a recent art auction. At what point do reasonable people conclude that creating art requires consciousness? Researchers could conduct a kind of “artistic Turing Test”: ask study participants to consider various artworks and say which ones they conclude were probably created by a human. If AI artwork consistently fools people into thinking it was made by a person, is that good evidence to conclude that the AI is at least in some ways conscious? So far AI aren’t convincing most observers, but it’s reasonable to expect that they will be able to in the future. Where’s my ‘consciousness-ometer’? Can anyone get a definitive answer about the presence of consciousness, and how much? Unfortunately, the answer to both questions is no. There is not yet a “consciousness-ometer,” but various researchers, including Dehaene, have some ideas. Neuroscientist Giulio Tononi and his colleagues like Christof Koch focus on what they call “integrated information” as a measure of consciousness. This theory suggests that anything that integrates at least one bit of information has at least a tiny amount of consciousness. A light diode, for example, contains just one bit of information and thus has a very limited type of consciousness. With just two possible states, on or off, however, it’s a rather uninteresting kind of consciousness. In my work, my collaborators and I share this “panpsychist” foundation. We accept as a working hypothesis that any physical system has some associated consciousness, however small it may be in the vast majority of cases. Rather than integrated information as the key measure of consciousness, however, we focus on resonance and synchronization and the degree to which parts of a whole resonate at the same or similar frequencies. Resonance in the case of the human brain generally means shared electric field oscillation rates, such as gamma band synchrony (40-120 Hertz). Our consciousness-ometer would then look at the degree of shared resonance and resulting information flows as the measure of consciousness. Humans and other mammals enjoy a particularly rich kind of consciousness, because there are many levels of pervasive shared synchronization throughout the brain, nervous system and body. Tests for consciousness are still in their infancy. But this field of study is undergoing a renaissance because the study of consciousness more generally has finally become a respectable scientific pursuit. Before too long it may be possible to measure just how much consciousness is present in various entities — including in you and me. [Deep knowledge, daily. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter. ] This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.last_img read more

Bengal investor meet gets proposals worth ₹284 lakh cr


first_imgCOMMENTS SHARE Published on Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee at the BGBS   –  Debasish Bhaduri SHARE SHARE EMAIL February 08, 2019center_img Investment proposals worth over ₹2.84 lakh crore were made at the two-day Bengal Global Business Summit (BGBS) that ended here today. This is nearly 30 per cent higher than the ₹2.19 lakh crore received through its business summit last year.According to Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, the investments are expected to create 8-10 lakh jobs in the State.“Till now, we have received ₹2,84,288-crore worth investment proposals. This is the achievement of this BGBS. Investment means business, which in turn means creation of new jobs. With this kind of investment, we expect 8-10 lakh new jobs to be created in Bengal,” said Banerjee, while addressing at a session of the fifth edition of the BGBS here on Friday.According to Banerjee, nearly 40 per cent of the total investment proposals around ₹10 lakh crore received in the last four editions of BGBS are under various stages of implementation. Around 5,000 delegates from 35 countries participated in the two-day business summit. Nearly 63 business-to-government, 45 business-to-consumer, and around 1,200 business-to-business meetings were held; around 86 memorandums of understanding were signed during the summit this year.“West Bengal is the safest place to invest in. The outcome of this business summit proves the credibility and accountability of participants and the State government,” she said. Banerjee added that the State government will ensure that Bengal is the “investment destination for future. “With our initiatives, we will prove that Bengal is the destination of investments,” she said. events COMMENT West Bengallast_img read more

Train carrying water from Jolarpettai arrives in parched Chennai


first_img Next Train carrying water from Jolarpettai arrives in parched ChennaiThe train with 50 tank wagons (BTPN), carrying 50,000 litres of water in each of them from Jolarpettai in Tamil Nadu’s Vellore district, reached the filling station at the Integral Coach Factory in Villivakkam Friday afternoon.advertisement Press Trust of India ChennaiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 14:15 IST Around 100 inlet pipes installed near the railway tracks would be used to discharge 2.5 million litres of water. (Photo: IANS)A train carrying 2.5 million litres of water arrived in Chennai, which has been grappling with an acute water crisis over the past few months, officials said Friday.The train with 50 tank wagons (BTPN), carrying 50,000 litres of water in each of them from Jolarpettai in Tamil Nadu’s Vellore district, reached the filling station at the Integral Coach Factory in Villivakkam Friday afternoon.Around 100 inlet pipes installed near the railway tracks would be used to discharge 2.5 million litres of water in all the wagons to be sent to a treatment plant after passing through a conduit, an official of Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board said.”After treatment it would be sent for distribution. This arrangement has been made for the next six months until the (advent of the) north-east monsoon,” the official told PTI.The train was supposed to reach Chennai on Thursday, but leakages in the valves led to the delay. Jolarpettai is 217 km away from the southern metropolis.All the arrangements took around 20 days of time to complete.The initiative would be formally inaugurated by Tamil Nadu Ministers later in the day, the official said.Chennai has been grappling with an acute water crisis over the past few months. The southern metropolis is facing a daily water deficit of at least 200 million litres, and the four reservoirs supplying to the city have run dry.The Tamil Nadu government had earlier requested the railways to help them ferry the water to the city.Earlier, Chief Minister K Palaniswami had announced mitigating Chennai’s water woes by getting drinking water supplied from Jolarpettai with an allocation of Rs 65 crore.ALSO READ | Water woes: Running out of time | India Today InsightALSO WATCH | Tamil Nadu remains on edge as state struggles to endure water crisisFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySnigdha Choudhurylast_img read more