Saint Mary’s senior education majors transition into student teaching


first_imgSenior education majors at Saint Mary’s are beginning their transition into student teaching this week. The students will begin teaching at local elementary and secondary schools and will work on their portfolios, lesson plans and testing.Maeve Sullivan is an elementary education major with a minor in mild intervention which, she said, consists of “helping students who have mild cognitive or physical disabilities.” “Education is becoming more inclusive to those who are cognitively and physically disabled, and mild intervention is why I got into education,” she said. “Indiana has mild, moderate and severe categories of [educational] intervention.”Samantha Allen said she has always wanted to be a teacher and is glad to be teaching kindergarten this semester. “I really enjoy having students learn how to tie their shoes,” she said. “It’s such a small thing that people don’t realize they learned at one point, and the students feel so overwhelmed at the beginning — to the point of tears — and it’s so sad but a little bit funny. I teach them the steps, and then we go over the steps each time — shoes come untied every five minutes, so there’s always a learning opportunity. It’s truly the joy of my day. They know I’m the teacher who will call them out on their shoe-tying.”Allen said most students began teaching Tuesday. “I have eight full weeks in a general classroom and then seven weeks in an English-as-a-second-language classroom,” she said.  Although she initially came to Saint Mary’s to be a nursing major, Sullivan said she easily made the switch to education, as the two have similar philosophies. “Nursing and education really bring in people who serve others and want to make a difference in the lives of others,” she said. “I’m Catholic, so serving others has been a huge driving force for me.”Sullivan said their semester began with a seminar discussing the transition, including the necessary exams and portfolios. “We had an introduction into our portfolios, which are where we compile student work and lesson plans from different content areas,” she said. “They’re a huge part of the student teaching process.”Education majors have regular assessments that consist of testing and teaching lessons to the students, Allen said. “We have to do an assessment cycle where we have to give a pretest and then teach a lesson and then give another test until we give them a final test,” she said. “That’s the minimum requirement.” Saint Mary’s has given Sullivan the opportunity to encounter real-life experiences as a teacher, she said. “Saint Mary’s has put me in so many different types of schools with different types of students and in different areas of South Bend,” she said. “They’ve really allowed us to come into contact with some of the things we’ll see as teachers so that we’ll have already learned how to respond to them.” Allen said the College expects the best from its education majors.“Saint Mary’s is very extensive about what they require of education majors in order to best prepare us,” she said. “In the moment, it seems very overwhelming, but they’re so supportive and encouraging. They want the best for you, and they expect the best from you.”Sullivan is worried her penchant for perfection will cause her to overestimate and exhaust herself, she said. “I’m a perfectionist, so a fear of mine is knowing you can only do so much on your end as a teacher,” she said. “One has to understand that there is human limitation — there’s only so much you can do as a teacher. You have to teach and they have to learn, and that child’s future is literally in your hands.”Allen’s goal is to create a productive and healthy classroom environment, she said. “I’m working on classroom management, which is learning how to best de-escalate any situation or how to be the one in charge but still have fun and have students enjoy learning,” she said.  Allen said she hopes those who want to become teachers are passionate about teaching and are not just teaching as a backup plan.  “I think people who feel a passion towards education and lifelong learning are people who would really benefit from going into education,” she said. “I hope that people teach from a place of love and not from a place of desperation.”Sullivan said her goal for the semester is to get to know her class personally and academically. “I’ve gotten all the tools from Saint Mary’s, so I’m excited to see what I can do and also surprise myself a little, too,” she said. Tags: education, learning, Saint Mary’s education major, student teachinglast_img read more

J-D softball needs late surge to beat ESM


first_imgFor five innings in the rematch, it remained 0-0, Myshrall matched by ESM counterpart Shaina Brilbeck. J-D had plenty of early opportunities, yet could not convert on any of them.But in the top of the sixth, the Rams broke through against Brilbeck, scoring twice, and just to be sure tacked on four runs in the seventh inning.Madi Ancone doubled twice and Emma White also doubled, each of them getting a pair of RBIs. Ancone scored twice as Miriam Zoghby also drove in a run. Paige Keeler contributed two hits. Myshrall also had two hits while putting together a complete-game shutout. She struck out five and limited the Spartans to five hits, one each by Morgan Ransom, Gianna Quonce, Gillianne McCarthy, Holly Carr and Bella Pickard.Back on May 4, J-D had beaten Williamsville North 6-2. Katie White hit a home run and got three RBIs, with Andrea Sumida adding a triple as she drove in two runs.Victor, though, beat the Rams 3-1, getting single runs off Myshrall in the second, fifth and sixth innings and blanking J-D until Avery Young drove in Katie Dorazio in the top of the seventh.After the defeat to J-D, the Spartans had its game with Syracuse last Tuesday rained out and another one with Cicero-North Syracuse on Thursday moved back to May 20.When it returned on Wednesday, ESM could not get on the board in an 8-0 defeat to Syracuse, who used a five-run first inning and three-run fourth inning to support pitcher Adonia Wade.All Wade did was hold the Spartans to three hits while striking out 10. Ransom had two of those hits, while also pitching as Wade and Donyeasha Bacon each had two RBIs for Syracuse.J-D, meanwhile, was mostly contained in last Wednesday’s game against Fulton, but with Myshrall nearly carrying the team, the Red Rams beat the Red Raiders 5-1.Much of the reason why J-D built a 5-0 advantage through five innings was that Fulton couldn’t get Myshrall out. She homered, doubled, tripled and earned four RBIs, also scoring a pair of runs.Keeler added four hits as Kate Dorazio scored twice and Ancone added two hits. Myshrall lost her shutout in the top of the sixth, but still limited Fulton to three hits and earned eight strikeouts.It was easier for J-D on Thursday as it blanked Cortland 12-0, Myshrall limiting the Purple Tigers to one hit while striking out five while watching her teammates excel at the plate, though Myshrall did have a double and RBI.Dorazio, in particular, had a big day, going four-for-five with a double and three RBIs. Sumida had three hits, scored four times and drove in two runs, with Keeler adding a double and three RBIs.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Tags: ESMJ-DSoftballcenter_img Even if it has a large advantage over most of its possible challengers in the Section III Class A ranks, the Jamesville-DeWitt softball team cannot feel completely safe.The Red Rams, whose first loss of the season came May 4 against Victor to end a nine-game win streak, found itself pushed hard by East Syracuse Minoa last Monday at Carrier Park before a late surge at the plate, plus Shayna Myshrall’s pitching, put away the Spartans 6-0.This wasn’t a big surprise, since J-D and ESM had played a close one April 18 that the Rams won 5-4 after trailing 4-0 early, needing three runs in the fourth inning and two more runs in the bottom of the seventh to pull it out.last_img read more

Softball struggles in late innings


first_imgJEFF SCHORFHEIDE/Herald photoOne of the nagging problems all year for the Wisconsinsoftball team popped up again Saturday as the team failed to close out a winafter leading for much of the game.The Badgers gave up a lead in each game of Saturday’s twinbill against Ohio State, including a devastating 6-3 loss in game one.With its postseason hopes on the line and a 3-0 leadentering the seventh inning, UW was unable to put the Buckeyes away as pitcherLeah Vanevenhoven allowed six runs in the inning.“Losing that game was so heartbreaking,” freshman Livi Abneysaid. “We thought we had it; we went in with a 3-0 lead and we just weren’table to get it done for some reason.”Similarly, two weekends ago, the Badgers played adoubleheader at Illinois, during which they enjoyed a lead in both games beforeletting the Illini rally back for victories.In the game one, Wisconsin took a 2-1 lead into the bottomof the sixth inning. Unfortunately, Vanevenhoven gave up a two-run home runover center fielder Sarah Bryers, giving the Illini a 3-2 lead they would notrelinquish.The second game was much the same as the first, but theIllini did not wait as long to overtake the Badgers’ lead. With a 3-0 lead inthe bottom of the third, Wisconsin allowed six runs – including a three-runhome run by Bryers, which again knocked Vanevenhoven out of the game.Earlier in the week, Wisconsin had traveled to South Bend,Ind. for a nonconference matchup with Notre Dame. Much like the Illini series,the Irish rallied back from five down in the fourth to crush the Badgers 11-5.“One of the things we’ve needed to work on all year isputting the nail in the coffin,” junior Theresa Boruta said. “It’s alwaysdisappointing and it’s one of the most frustrating things that can happen to ateam.”Two things have occurred often in the Badgers late losses:an inability to keep the ball in the park and significant defensive miscues.One game that exemplified these problems for the Cardinaland White was the April 9 home matchup with Northern Iowa. Although Wisconsinnever led in the game, Vanevenhoven carried a no-hitter through 6 2/3 innings.In the seventh inning of that game, an Abney errorcontributed to a Northern Iowa rally. If not for the error, Vanevenhoven likelywould have gotten out of the inning with the no-hit bid intact. Instead, thejunior allowed a three-run home run before recording the third out.“It was disappointing,” assistant coach Julie Wright said afterthe loss. “We played well up until the breakdown with the error. Quite frankly,that lost the game for us.”Another problem in these losses has been the inability ofthe Wisconsin offense to make comebacks. In the previously mentioned losses, UWmanaged to come back in only one game – the second game against Illinois – butstill came up short in that contest.A great example of this is the second game against PennState on April 13. Vanevenhoven pitched brilliantly throughout, allowing onlytwo runs. Yet, after the Nittany Lions scored in the top of the sixth, theBadgers went down in order in each of the last two innings.“We just failed to adjust to what she was throwing,” juniorValyncia Raphael said following the game. “She was throwing us a lot more junkthan we saw in the first game. She threw more stuff off the plate and changedspeeds a lot. We struggled to adjust to the tempo of the game.”Of course, with Saturday’s win in game two, the Badgersfinally were able to overcome the things that had plagued them for much of theseason.This time, rather than succumb to the Buckeyes’ late rally,the Badgers did something they hadn’t done in a long time – make a seventhinning comeback.After giving up two runs in the top of the seventh –something all too familiar to UW – Wisconsin rallied back in the bottom of theinning, scoring three runs to win it on Boruta’s infield single.The win was the first for the Badgers in their last at-batsince Raphael beat Princeton with a walk-off home run on March 23.“It felt absolutely great and we needed it, especiallyconsidering the way the first game went,” Boruta said of the win. “Being ableto bounce back is always a good thing; it’s always a momentum builder.”?last_img read more

Fast Reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 55-53 win over Michigan State


first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 18, 2018 at 5:25 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Commentscenter_img DETROIT — Syracuse will keep on dancing.Even without its starting point guard over the final 6:39, Syracuse went on a big run to close out the game and beat No. 3 seed Michigan State on Sunday afternoon at Little Caesars Arena.Less than 48 hours after playing lockdown defense against high-powered No. 6 seed Texas Christian, Syracuse (23-13, 8-10 Atlantic Coast) beat No. 3 seed Michigan State (30-5, 16-2 Big 10), 55-53. A ferocious defensive effort by SU sent the Orange to the Sweet 16 in Omaha, Nebraska, next week.The Spartans entered the season ranked No. 2 in the AP Top 25, has never been ranked lower than No. 9 and has been ranked outside the top-five for just two all weeks all season. MSU ended the year ranked No. 5 and, by some accounts, should have received an even higher seed than No. 3.But Syracuse’s strong defense prevailed. Tyus Battle led the Orange with 17 points and Oshae Brissett added 15 in the win.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHere are three quick takeaways from the game.Key stretchSyracuse went off on a 7-0 run over a 1:20 period late in the game, even with starting junior point guard Frank Howard out because he picked up his fifth personal foul on a questionable 50-50 ball near midcourt. MSU didn’t make a single field goal over the final 5:40 of game time.Brissett worked chaos way inside a crowd of white jerseys and converted a layup. Marek Dolezaj made two free throws. Former-walk on Braedon Bayer held his own at the top of the 2-3 zone and defense to keep SU in the contest and keep dancing on.Meat and potatoesAt points, Michigan State’s 21 second-chance points sucked the life out of Syracuse, elongated possessions and gave the mostly MSU-backed arena something to cheer about. The deep, well-balanced MSU offense had trouble all game against SU’s 2-3 zone. But collecting offensive boards — sometimes three on a single time down the floor — provided ample opportunities to maintain a lead until the closing minutes.The Spartans front line is no taller than that of Syracuse, but they are muscular and physical inside. They crashed the glass hard. But Syracuse’s defense mounted nearly every Spartan first-chance and maintained the gridlock defense that powered it past high-powered offenses in Arizona State, Texas Christian and now Michigan State.Twenty-six offensive rebounds weren’t enough for the Spartans because SU’s defense didn’t allow space and forced MSU to shoot 17-for-66 from the field.Brissett vs. BridgesArguably the two most talented players on the court, MSU sophomore Miles Bridges and SU freshman Oshae Brissett, matched up in several one-on-one situations. Both clearly indicated they were the alpha male of their respective team. Brissett took command of the SU offense, knocking down contested shots and maneuvering inside.With just over a minute left, Brissett grabbed a defensive rebound to set up a Battle step-back jumper that pushed SU’s lead to three. Brissett also had nine rebounds and played the whole game.last_img read more