Supreme Court Blocks More Senators-elect


first_imgThe Supreme Court of Liberia through Justice-in-Chambers Philip A.Z. Banks III has prohibited from taking office three more Senators-elect whom the National Elections Commission (NEC) declared winners.The Court’s Writs Of Prohibition were issued to Maryland, Grand Kru and River Gee Counties’ Senators-elect, J. Gbleh-bo Brown, Albert Tugbe Chie, and Commany B. Wesseh, respectively, citing alleged elections irregularities. The Congress of Democratic Change (CDC) Representative Dr. Bhofal Chambers complained of massive wrongdoings during the election in Maryland County. Former Superintendent Rosalind S.T. Sneh of the ruling Unity Party (UP), who ran for Senator from  Grand Kru County,  complained to the High Court of  huge election irregularities; while ex-Lone Star striker, Jonathan Boye Charles Sogbai protested that there was voter fraud in River Gee County.Earlier the Supreme Court prevented the certification of Senators-elect Cllr. Varney G. Sherman of Grand Cape Mount, Dr. Jim W. Tornonlah of Margibi County and Atty. Morris G. Saytumah of Bomi County.The CDC candidates Dr. Foday Kromah and Prof. Ansu Sonii and incumbent Senator Lahia G. Lansanna of the National Patroitic Party (NPP) are the petitioners.Up to press time yesterday, the three latest stalled Senators-elect and their lawyers separately held conference hearings with the Justice-in-Chambers.The investigation of election irregularities by the Supreme Court meant the six (6) Senators-elect may not be inducted as Senators on Monday, January 12, 2015, if they have not been cleared by the opinion of the Supreme Court.It may be recalled that last Saturday, the National Elections Commission (NEC) certified 12 of the 15 Senators elected during the December 20, 2014 Special Senatorial Election.The certification ceremony took place at the headquarters of the National Elections Commission in Monrovia.In his remarks during the ceremony, the Chairman of the Commission, Cllr. Jerome G. Korkoya, said the certificates issued to the Senators-elect are testimony of the Power that was transferred to them by the people of Liberia when they went to the polls on December 20, 2014.Chairman Korkoya said the NEC acknowledges the low turnout during the election and will take the necessary measures to encourage higher voter participation in future elections.Also speaking during the ceremony, the Vice President of Liberia, Joseph N. Boakai, expressed regret over the deaths of some registered voters as a result of the deadly Ebola Virus Disease in the country.“I kindly ask you to remain on your feet and observe a moment of silence in memory of those registered voters who did not have the opportunity to vote; Ebola took their lives.  So we just want to remember them with silent prayer,” VP Boakai stated. Vice President Boakai then cautioned the newly elected Senators to become useful leaders in the new Legislature.He also lauded Liberians, including both winners and losers, for ensuring a peaceful election, adding that it was remarkable to see the losers respectfully conceding defeat and remaining peaceful. VP Boakai has at the same time expressed thanks and appreciation to the international community and other partners, on behalf of the Government of Liberia, for standing by the country and its citizens during the Ebola epidemic in the country.  Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Disruptive behaviors in autistic children linked to reduced brain connectivity


first_img Source:https://news.yale.edu/2019/04/18/behavioral-disorders-kids-autism-linked-lower-brain-connectivity Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 19 2019More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.”Disruptive behaviors such as aggression, irritability, and noncompliance are common in children with autism, and are among the main reasons for psychiatric treatment and even hospitalization,” said Denis Sukhodolsky, senior author and associate professor in the Yale Child Study Center. “Yet, little is known about the biological underpinnings of behavioral problems in children with autism.”Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsThe first of its kind, the Yale study used fMRI scans conducted during an emotion perception task to compare the brain activity of autistic children who do and do not exhibit disruptive behavior. While in the scanner, the children were asked to view pictures of human faces that displayed calm or fearful expressions.During the task, the researchers found reduced connectivity between the amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex — a pathway critical to the regulation of emotion — in the brains of children who exhibit disruptive behavior as compared to the brains of children who do not. “Reduced amygdala-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity was uniquely associated with disruptive behavior but not with severity of social deficits or anxiety, suggesting a distinct brain network that could be separate from core autism symptoms,” explained Karim Ibrahim, first author and postdoctoral fellow in the Sukhodolsky lab.”This finding points to a brain mechanism of emotion dysregulation in children with autism and offers a potential biomarker for developing targeted treatments for irritability and aggression in autism,” said Sukhodolsky.last_img read more

German airports brace for Thursday strike


first_img Citation: German airports brace for Thursday strike (2019, January 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-german-airports-brace-thursday.html © 2019 AFP Flights scrapped as Berlin airports brace for Monday strike The walkout was to begin at 3:00 am (0200 GMT) in the airports of Dusseldorf, Cologne-Bonn and Stuttgart, and was to continue until midnight, the union said Wednesday.A warning strike took place on Monday morning at Berlin’s two airports, Tegel and Schoenefeld, forcing the cancellation of about 50 flights.Verdi, which represents 23,000 airport security personnel, wants wages raised to 20 euros ($23) an hour from around 17 euros currently, an increase of around 17 percent.The BDLS employers association has offered pay increases of between 2.0 and 8.1 percent.The next round of talks is scheduled for January 23. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img A warning strike took place on Monday morning at Berlin’s two airports, forcing the cancelation of about 50 flights. Explore further Thousands of passengers in Germany face disruption on Thursday following a strike call by security staff at three major airports, the powerful Verdi union said.last_img read more

A new method for ethical data science


first_img Citation: A new method for ethical data science (2019, March 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-method-ethical-science.html A less technical way of looking at it is that people, fundamentally, are team players: they want to fit in and may find it difficult to criticise the work of their close colleagues. They might also become subject to ‘group think’ without realising it.In Wellcome Data Labs we have worked out a paired approach to Agile ethics which is intended to resolve this issue. Our proposed methodology has three steps:Embedding within Data Labs a user researcher with a background both in working as part of Agile product teams and in carrying out social sciences research. This embedded researcher will have the explicitly defined objective of testing the algorithmic models the software developers and data scientists are working on from the point of view of their possible social impact.They will adjust and develop their analysis iteratively to match the speed of the technology work and feed their emergent conclusions back to the data scientists to steer the course of their work.The embedded researcher will be paired up with another social scientist outside the team to provide an objective critique and the necessary checks and balances on their analysis.All three parts of the proposed methodology are equally important.Not embedding the researcher in the team would make it hard for them to have a close enough knowledge of what the data scientists are doing.Not iteratively retesting and rewriting their analysis of possible social impact will fail to match the rhythm of the technological development  –  the key proposed advantage of this methodology.Finally, the pairing is designed to prevent the embedded researcher risking a loss of their professional detachment and objectivity, which is a risk precisely because they are so closely embedded within the technology teams.This whole approach is an experiment in itself and we are not at all certain that it will work. However, that is exactly what makes it exciting to us. We hope it will help us become better aware of the biases being introduced by the algorithms that we develop and minimise any potential negative unintentional consequences of the tools the team produces.This is important because Wellcome, as a significant funder of scientific research, has a notable impact on the academic and health industries. And Wellcome Data Labs’ analysis feeds into Wellcome’s decision making process. Any unintended biases in the algorithms my team produces that can impact Wellcome’s decisions, could have a ripple effect on the decisions of more funders, which in turn could cascade down to secondary impacts on other industries and the wider society. We have a responsibility to get it right. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Artificial Intelligence is transforming our world, sometimes in ways that its creators did not intend. In Wellcome Data Labs we are developing a new method of applying approaches from the social sciences to the way AI algorithms are produced to solve data science problems. The goal is to avoid potential negative consequences of the algorithms by identifying them earlier in the development process.center_img Provided by Wellcome Trust There have been attempts to set out such a way of working already. An example is Catalina Butnaru’s excellent post proposing a new Agile ethics process. There is much to recommend this approach, not least that it is systematic and aligned closely in its steps to well-known steps of agile software development methodologies.However, Butnaru does not address the mechanics of how her suggested Agile ethics process could be managed. Is it the team of data scientists and engineers themselves who are responsible for following the steps? Or their product manager? Or the UX team? Or a separate team to the engineers that audits their work?We have been thinking about such questions a lot, since we are keen to test out how ethical approaches can be applied to the work of data scientists in practice and not just in theory.The key challenge we set ourselves is: how to apply a process such as Butnaru’s, or one of the other rival methodologies, in a way that measurably reduces ethical issues, like inadvertent bias, but does not reduce the energy and effectiveness of our Agile product teams?We think this can be done by encouraging social scientists to work as part of interdisciplinary teams with software developers and data scientists, adopting their agile and iterative methodologies.I have outlined some of the challenges of doing this. For example, the difficulty of getting social science researchers to work at the same speed and to the same rhythm as the software developers and data scientists. However, there is a potential template to follow by learning from the successful integration of the User Experience discipline into the software development workflows.There is an additional challenge, though. Relying on a user researcher embedded in a product team to steer that team through an Agile ethics methodology on their own introduces the risk of them losing objectivity. This is a well-known issue in ethnographic research, where there is an active tension between a researcher’s role as an impartial observer and the alternative of being an active participant. A framework for AI-powered agile project managementlast_img read more

Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland


first_img Editor’s note: This article was updated to fix a statement about the interpretation of the cannabis pollen. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo Photos: Viking Warrior Is Actually a Woman 30 of the World’s Most Valuable Treasures That Are Still Missing The discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America. The researchers also found evidence the Vikings occupied this outpost for more than a century, way longer than previously believed. Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L’Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period. The new research, published today (July 15) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that the Vikings lived there possibly into the 12th or even the 13th century. [In Photos: Viking Outposts Possibly Found in Canada]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65940-were-vikings-smoking-pot-in-newfoundland.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Bog finds In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of “ecofacts” — environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans — that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland — Simplocaria metallica, from Greenland, and Acidota quadrata, from the Arctic. The layer also held pollen from Juglans (walnuts) and from Humulus (cannabis), two species that don’t naturally grow at L’Anse aux Meadows; rather, the Vikings could have picked up all of these plant and animal species when they sailed south. [Photos: 10th-Century Viking Tomb Unearthed in Denmark] They also found the remains of dung from grazing caribou, as well as remains of wood and charcoal. The layer from the peat bog is similar to other “cultural layers from across the Norse North Atlantic,” the archaeological team wrote in the journal article. More evidence Additionally, the archaeologists performed Bayesian analysis — a type of statistical analysis — on radiocarbon dates from artifacts previously excavated at L’Anse aux Meadows. That analysis also suggested Viking occupation for up to 200 years. “This does not imply a continuous occupation,” the researchers wrote, noting that the Vikings could have abandoned and reoccupied L’Anse aux Meadows when it suited them. Did the Vikings use pot in Newfoundland? The finding of cannabis pollen raises the question of whether the Vikings used cannabis for making clothes or for medicinal-recreational purposes while they explored North America. Paul Ledger, the lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at Memorial University of Newfoundland urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. Ledger urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. It’s also possible that some of the other “ecofacts” were brought to the peat bog by indigenous peoples who lived in Newfoundland, and not by the Vikings. [Fierce Fighters: 7 Secrets of Viking Seamen] Ultimately, “the results presented here [in the journal article] pose more questions than answers,” the archaeological team wrote. Reaction from other Viking researchers Viking researchers not affiliated with the research team urged caution about the results. “I think it is too early to draw any conclusions,” said Birgitta Wallace, a senior archaeologist emerita with Parks Canada who has done extensive research on the Vikings in North America. Wallace told Live Science that she isn’t convinced that the Vikings left behind these ecofacts. “I think it is highly unlikely that the Norse [another word for Vikings] would have returned in the 12th and 13th centuries, as there are no structures on the site from that period that could be Norse,” Wallace said. “We do know that there were indigenous people, ancestors of the Beothuk, on the site at that time.” Patricia Sutherland, a visiting scientist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who has also done extensive research on the Vikings in North America, said that while the Vikings could have been in Newfoundland during the 12th or 13th centuries, it is too early to say for sure. “It seems premature to suggest such a scenario on the basis of the ‘ecofacts’ listed in the paper,” Sutherland said. It’s possible that some of the beetles and plant pollen found in the layer were brought to L’Anse aux Meadows by the Vikings around A.D. 1000, and they continued to flourish after the Vikings left, Sutherland said. The research team plans to continue their work at L’Anse aux Meadows in August, Ledger said. The 25 Most Mysterious Archaeological Finds on Earthlast_img read more