Researchers warn of resistant flu, foodborne microbes


first_imgMar 19, 2008 – ATLANTA (CIDRAP News) – Serious microbial threats, including drug-resistant influenza and foodborne pathogens, remain stubbornly persistent even as unpredictable new threats are emerging, researchers said this week at the leading international conference on new and resurgent infectious diseases.Many of the threats are emerging in parts of the world too poor to fund adequate surveillance and control measures. And industrialized countries’ spending on intercepting those globalized infections is not keeping pace with the need.”Many of the challenges that face us right now are not likely to get better; in some ways, they are likely to get worse,” Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said during the opening speeches of the International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, which the CDC sponsors along with several scientific organizations. “These problems can only be solved by the investment necessary to tackle them.”Research presented at the conference ranged from information on the complexities of controlling and treating influenza and other respiratory diseases to insights into foodborne disease transmission. And as always at such a large conference—a biennial gathering of 2,000 scientists giving roughly 500 papers and posters—there were the scientific equivalent of early-warning alarms.In influenza news, CDC and state health department researchers found that:Adamantane drugs, the older of the two classes of influenza antivirals, are becoming increasingly useless against seasonal flu. A global survey of isolates collected during the 2006-07 flu season found 72% of H3N2 strains were resistant to adamantanes; in Asia, 100 percent of H1N1 strains were resistant, though 94% of US H1N1 strains remained vulnerable to the drugs.Meanwhile, resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors, the second class of flu drug, is creeping up. Between 2004 and the current flu season, the proportion of isolates resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors rose from 1% to 5% among all flu strains. Resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the more widely used drug in the class, rose to 9% among H1N1 strains.And in further confirmation that the current seasonal flu vaccine did not work as planned, an analysis of military flu-like illness statistics by the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego found the effectiveness of the flu shot against H1N1 strains was 71%, lower than recent CDC estimates.In a warning of the stealthy nature of novel flu strains, a team from the University of Florida, the CDC’s flu branch, and a pet-rescue program called HemoPet/Pet Life-Line found that canine influenza has been circulating without detection far longer than supposed. The disease, which kills by hemorrhagic pneumonia, was first detected in dogs in Florida in 2004 and has since spread to 25 states and Washington, DC. But according to the rescue program’s blood-donor records, the strain has actually been in Florida dogs since 1999, and it may have caused unsolved respiratory disease outbreaks at dog tracks that year and in 2003.Among the reports on foodborne illnesses:The proportion of disease outbreaks linked to leafy greens is rising faster than the consumption of lettuce and spinach, signaling a true increase in the incidence of greens-related foodborne illness, according to CDC researchers.Strains of Salmonella isolated from cattle slaughtered at plants monitored by the US Department of Agriculture showed significant increases between 1997 and 2005 in resistance to cephalosporins, a class of drugs used in both veterinary and human medicine. Proportions of isolates resistant to the veterinary drug ceftriaxone increased from 1% to 2.1%; to ceftiofur, from 0% to 21.6%; and to cefoxitin, from 9.1% to 19.8%.And research done at the University of Pennsylvania found that 22% of raw chicken purchased at retail outlets in central Pennsylvania in 2006 and 2007 was contaminated with Salmonella; 53% of the Salmonella isolates were resistant to at least one drug, and 45% were resistant to five drugs or more.Blood and organ transplants are emerging as a rare and unpredictable route for transmission of infections, according to research presented at the conference, which featured reports of tuberculosis transmitted via transplant and fatal Group C streptococcal infection transmitted by transfused pooled platelets.And in just two of many reports on the increasingly high-profile pathogen MRSA—methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which causes both healthcare-acquired and community-acquired infections—CDC researchers reported a higher-than-predicted rate of community-acquired pneumonias due to MRSA. In addition, Dr. J. Scott Weese, a veterinarian from the Ontario Veterinary College, delivered preliminary results of a survey of 212 raw pork products purchased in four Canadian provinces that found a MRSA contamination rate of almost 10%.last_img read more

The stats that defined each fall Syracuse sports team’s season


first_imgWith all of Syracuse’s fall sports wrapped up, The Daily Orange Sports Staff reviewed each team’s season. No team made it out of the second round of their respective sport’s NCAA tournament, and some teams failed to make the postseason altogether. Still, players like Ryan Raposo shined, and teams like Field Hockey, who beat three top-five teams, enjoyed high-points.Below are the season-defining statistics for each Syracuse fall team.Syracuse football allowed 50 sacks this year. Only two teams – Old Dominion and Akron – allowed more in the regular season. As SU (5-7, 2-6 Atlantic Coast) slipped further down the conference ranks, the sacks piled up. By the time the Orange lost to Florida State on Oct. 26, Syracuse had allowed seven or more sacks in three-straight games against Power 5 opponents and 37 total.The Orange’s protection of the quarterback improved in the final four games of the season, leading to two Syracuse wins. Part of the success came following a lineup switch when Carlos Vettorello and Airon Servais rotated spots, putting Servais at left tackle and Vettorello at center. Following that switch, SU’s quarterbacks were sacked just five times in three games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBut the early season woes on the offensive line will be what is remembered from Syracuse’s 2019 season because of how much it inhibited the offense. For a large portion of the year, SU couldn’t run the ball. When forced to pass, quarterback Tommy DeVito rarely had time to set his feet before a defender had hands on him.Raposo finished with 15 goals, improving upon his tally of four from his freshman year. Only three players in program history have finished a season with more goals than Raposo — most recently Paul Young with 16 in 1991.Raposo’s breakout campaign culminated with two goals in the opening round of the NCAA tournament, when Syracuse (8-7-5, 2-4-2 ACC) beat Rhode Island on his late penalty goal. He was the focal point of an improved Syracuse offense in 2019. While the Orange generated about the same number of shots per game as the previous year, Raposo’s finishing and creativity in and around the penalty box helped SU beat two ranked teams and return to the NCAA tournament for the sixth time in eight years.After managing to score only 11 goals in 2018, head coach Phil Wheddon resigned and Nicky Adams took over. The transition wasn’t easy; the Orange scored only 12 goals in 16 games this season.That offensive drought for the Orange (3-11-2, 1-7-1 ACC) led to zero road wins and included a stretch from Sept. 1 to Oct. 9 where SU only scored one goal – it was on a penalty kick. The Orange were held shotless on Oct. 4 against Notre Dame and were outshot 262-148 on the season.Syracuse was also hindered by injuries and couldn’t run a full 11-on-11 practice the entire season.Junior Kate Hostage, SU’s 2018 leading goal scorer, missed the entire season, as did junior forward Kate Donovan. Key contributors – seniors Sydney Brackett and Georgia Allen – were also among the players to have prolonged absences. Third-string goalie and former SU volleyball standout Santita Ebangwese was forced to play minutes at forward for several games.Despite the team’s offensive futility, junior goalie Lysianne Proulx shined, leading the ACC with 83 saves.Though Syracuse lost 5-1 in the first round of the NCAA tournament, the Orange (12-7, 3-3 ACC) beat three top-5 teams in 2019. Wins against No. 2 Duke, No. 3 Connecticut and No. 5 Louisville earned them their 11th national tournament berth under head coach Ange Bradley.Early in the season, SU relied heavily on freshman Charlotte de Vries (15 goals) on offense, but it eventually developed a more balanced attack. SU’s leading scorer finished the season on a four-game scoreless streak.SU ended its season with losses to Louisville in the ACC tournament and Princeton in the NCAA tournament. In the two postseason games combined, the Orange scored one goal.After top-2 finishes for both the men and women in their first two meets of 2019, Syracuse looked like it was rebounding from a rough finish at the NCAA Championships in 2018. Last year, the men finished 26th and the women failed to qualify.At the third meet of the season, the Orange began to slip. The men finished 24th while the women finished 25th – one of the worst regular season performances in recent history.Soon after that, top runners on both sides experienced injuries and the women didn’t qualify for the national meet. The men finished 27th of 31 teams, their lowest finish since 2008.Last season, Polina Shemanova recorded a freshman-record 447 kills as the Orange made their first NCAA tournament appearance. This season, that momentum continued for the sophomore, who had 485 kills and led the ACC in kills, kills per set, points and points per set.Though the Orange (12-13, 9-9 ACC) finished eighth in the conference after a slow start and early-season injuries, Shemanova was the driving force for SU. Head coach Leonid Yelin said he expected Shemanova to step up in the game’s most important moments.During a five-match winning streak, Shemanova won ACC Player of the Week three-straight times, averaging 25.8 kills per game in that span. The Orange upset Notre Dame and Louisville, the then-second and -third best teams in the conference, respectively. Against the Cardinals, Shemanova had a school-record 36 kills and weeks later was a unanimous selection to the All-ACC first team.Graphics made by Eva Suppa | Digital Design Editor Comments Published on December 4, 2019 at 9:33 pm Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more