Caz grad plays in FCS Bowl all-star game


first_imgHis father, Paul Shaffner, is currently the defensive coordinator and inside linebackers coach for the Colgate Raiders football team. Prior to joining the Raiders, he coached at Buffalo State.“In elementary school I would stay at Buffalo State for their August camp,” Shaffner said. “I would sit in on my dad’s meetings with his players and [stay up for] all the late nights. This was the first time that my love for football was apparent.”A three-year letterman for Cazenovia High School, Shaffner was named the 2015 New York State Sportswriters and Coaches Class B Player of the Year after helping his team to achieve a 13-0 record and the Class B state title.During his time as a Laker, the player contributed to a three-year Cazenovia record of 32-2.“The run that we had as a team my senior year of high school — all the way to the state championship — was one of the biggest thrills of my life,” Shaffner said. “[That] was something that I could not have dreamed of without the help of my high school coaches and my team. Without them, I never could have been honored as [player] of the year.”In Feb. 2016, Shaffner signed his national letter of intent to become a Colgate student and athlete.“[He] handled all of Colgate’s long-snapping duties for nearly his entire football career, in addition to his every-down role as a reserve linebacker,” said Colgate University Director of Athletic Communications John Painter. “The senior helped Colgate placekicker Chris Puzzi set program field goal records for ‘made in a season’ and ‘accuracy’ in both a season and career. Shaffner also helped Barney Amor punt for a 42.1-yard average that set Colgate’s season mark for a minimum of 40 attempts.”Shaffner points to a game-winning field goal against James Madison University (JMU) in the second round of playoffs as a highlight of his college football career.“I was the long snapper for that play, which usually goes unnoticed, and I would not have it any other way,” he said. “The moment someone notices a long snapper, they messed up . . . The second moment [that stands out] was going out to my dad on senior day. He has coached me my entire life, and it was an extremely emotional thing for me.”Shaffner has dreamed of playing in the NFL since he was in first grade.In January, he will play in front of scouts at exposure events in Dallas, Texas and Mobile, Alabama.Following these two events, Shaffner expects to have a much better understanding of his chances at playing professionally.Outside the realm of football, Shaffner is interested in pursuing a career in commercial real estate development.“Basically, I have to wait and see how things go for me,” he said. “In the meantime, I will continue to work my butt off both in the weight room and on the field.”Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Tags: all-star gameCaz gradCazenovia footballCazenovia High SchoolCazenovia High School athleticscolgate universityFCS BowlJake Shaffnerpostseason college footballstudent athlete The game is open to collegiate players who have completed their eligibility in NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).“To be selected, it was a huge honor,” Shaffner said. “To be recognized for all of the hours and work I put into my craft is just something that makes [me] feel so good. Playing in the game was a very cool experience. I was surrounded by so much talent, [and it was] so fun to just go out and play. All star games . . . are a simplified version of football which brings you back to being a kid and playing in the backyard with all of your friends.”Although Shaffner did not start playing football until sixth grade, the game has always been a big part of his life.center_img By Kate HillStaff WriterIn December, Cazenovia High School graduate and Colgate University football player Jake Shaffner played in the sixth annual FCS Bowl — a postseason college football all-star game.Held in Deland, Florida, the game provided players from smaller colleges with the opportunity to shine in front of scouts from various professional football leagues, including the National Football League (NFL) and Canadian Football League (CFL).last_img read more

Student chosen for LA Health Commission


first_imgCrane worked with USG Sen. Jillian Halperin, a junior majoring in communication, and other senators to create the Bystander Intervention Training Program, a project that requires at least one executive board member of every registered student organization to undergo training to learn how to intervene in unsafe situations. “[I] saw a lot of problems with how education and public health was tackled by the campus,” Crane said. “I saw victims of sexual assault from my work [with EMS], and I saw issues of homelessness around USC with the Red Cross. I thought, ‘There’s got to be a better way to do this.’” “I think this is going to be an extension of who he has been as an intern — very forward-thinking, anticipatory, coming up with new ideas, always willing to take that extra step,” Vick said. Crane said his experience as a pre-med student, speaker pro tempore in Undergraduate Student Government, director of Emergency Medical Services at USC and president of the American Red Cross chapter at USC motivated him to approach medicine from the perspective of social advocacy. “I’m really happy that he took the initiative to ask,” Vick said. “I did not have a formal intern application … he just asked for the opportunity and we figured it out.” Crane said he has a lot to learn from the veterans in his commission and is excited to implement concrete policies that will benefit the community. “We provide policy recommendations on everything, from evaluating existing projects to proposing new ideas — trying to stem public health issues where they start,” Crane said. “Many of the things deal with social health disparities and advocacy on behalf of people who might not have as much of a voice in city council.” Crane will work with the commission over the summer until October, and in Fall 2019, he will attend The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Ever since senior Matthew Crane formed a close bond with a trauma surgeon at a local hospital he worked at, he knew he wanted to be a public health professional. As an intern, Crane was the primary author of the commission’s 2018 annual report, which presented and addressed a wide variety of issues facing the L.A. community, ranging from disease outbreaks to public bathroom availability. Senior Matthew Crane was sworn in as a Los Angeles City District Health Commissioner March 11. Crane, the USG Speaker Pro Tempore is the youngest member to ever be elected to the commission. (Photo from Facebook) “They were my first choice: they’re the No. 1 school for public health,” Crane said. “It was a really great fit at the interview … I’ll be attending there in the fall, pursuing an M.D. and hopefully an M.P.H. [Master of Public Health].” “Making the biggest impact on the community is something that I find personally rewarding,” Crane said. “When you look at really big issues — whether it’s homelessness in Los Angeles or sexual assault at USC — these are things that really need to be targeted with policies … that are wide-reaching. I think that public health is the way that you … solve those problems.” The Los Angeles City Health Commission’s goals are to evaluate the health needs of the city’s population, determine whether these needs are being met and implement cost-effective policies which address them, according to L.A. County Department of Public Health program director Nicole Vick. Crane was sworn in on March 11, and will represent the 13th district of Los Angeles. After working on the annual report and reading an article about UC Berkeley students being sworn into commissions, Crane said he was motivated to become a member. Vick said she first met Crane when he reached out to her for an internship opportunity after she came to speak at a USC Red Cross chapter meeting in 2017. “There was a recent Typhus outbreak, and right now, that’s a big focus for the city health commission,” Crane said. “We’re drafting a letter to the mayor regarding pest-resistant trash bins and having those made available in Skid Row.” Crane said that he often notices parallels between his work experience as a student and his current position as health commissioner, since they both entail serving and advocating for the well-being of specific communities. “The report establishes background for a lot of different areas of improvement within Los Angeles — things like sobering centers and public bathroom availability,” Crane said. “It provides a summary of where the issue is at right now, and then it provides policy recommendations.” Now, the human biology major and Undergraduate Student Government Speaker Pro Tempore has become the youngest person ever elected as a Los Angeles City Health Commission. “There were a few vacancies in the health commission,” Crane said. “I thought, ‘I’ll toss my resume in,’ and I got picked.” “He … chaired [the project] and was really helpful in coordinating with so many different campus partners in making sure that we could get the project funded,” Halperin said. “We really couldn’t have done that without him.” The commission and Crane are currently focused on drafting a resolution — set to be published next month — concerning health issues impacting citizens on Skid Row. Vick said she has no doubt that Crane will continue to pursue public health advocacy as a commission member with the same passion and drive he had as an intern. “I thought what [the trauma surgeon] did was really interesting,” Crane said. “I saw how he took care of the whole community … I thought, ‘That’s what I want to do.’” “There’s a lot of adults very experienced in politics [in the commission], and I’m just trying to catch up and learn what political advocacy looks like at that level,” Crane said. Halperin said she’s excited for the next chapter in Crane’s life. “Whatever he puts his mind to, he’s just going to succeed,” Halperin said. “I can’t believe he’s graduating and moving on, but he’s truly an incredible person and an incredible colleague.”last_img read more

The stats that defined each fall Syracuse sports team’s season


first_imgWith all of Syracuse’s fall sports wrapped up, The Daily Orange Sports Staff reviewed each team’s season. No team made it out of the second round of their respective sport’s NCAA tournament, and some teams failed to make the postseason altogether. Still, players like Ryan Raposo shined, and teams like Field Hockey, who beat three top-five teams, enjoyed high-points.Below are the season-defining statistics for each Syracuse fall team.Syracuse football allowed 50 sacks this year. Only two teams – Old Dominion and Akron – allowed more in the regular season. As SU (5-7, 2-6 Atlantic Coast) slipped further down the conference ranks, the sacks piled up. By the time the Orange lost to Florida State on Oct. 26, Syracuse had allowed seven or more sacks in three-straight games against Power 5 opponents and 37 total.The Orange’s protection of the quarterback improved in the final four games of the season, leading to two Syracuse wins. Part of the success came following a lineup switch when Carlos Vettorello and Airon Servais rotated spots, putting Servais at left tackle and Vettorello at center. Following that switch, SU’s quarterbacks were sacked just five times in three games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBut the early season woes on the offensive line will be what is remembered from Syracuse’s 2019 season because of how much it inhibited the offense. For a large portion of the year, SU couldn’t run the ball. When forced to pass, quarterback Tommy DeVito rarely had time to set his feet before a defender had hands on him.Raposo finished with 15 goals, improving upon his tally of four from his freshman year. Only three players in program history have finished a season with more goals than Raposo — most recently Paul Young with 16 in 1991.Raposo’s breakout campaign culminated with two goals in the opening round of the NCAA tournament, when Syracuse (8-7-5, 2-4-2 ACC) beat Rhode Island on his late penalty goal. He was the focal point of an improved Syracuse offense in 2019. While the Orange generated about the same number of shots per game as the previous year, Raposo’s finishing and creativity in and around the penalty box helped SU beat two ranked teams and return to the NCAA tournament for the sixth time in eight years.After managing to score only 11 goals in 2018, head coach Phil Wheddon resigned and Nicky Adams took over. The transition wasn’t easy; the Orange scored only 12 goals in 16 games this season.That offensive drought for the Orange (3-11-2, 1-7-1 ACC) led to zero road wins and included a stretch from Sept. 1 to Oct. 9 where SU only scored one goal – it was on a penalty kick. The Orange were held shotless on Oct. 4 against Notre Dame and were outshot 262-148 on the season.Syracuse was also hindered by injuries and couldn’t run a full 11-on-11 practice the entire season.Junior Kate Hostage, SU’s 2018 leading goal scorer, missed the entire season, as did junior forward Kate Donovan. Key contributors – seniors Sydney Brackett and Georgia Allen – were also among the players to have prolonged absences. Third-string goalie and former SU volleyball standout Santita Ebangwese was forced to play minutes at forward for several games.Despite the team’s offensive futility, junior goalie Lysianne Proulx shined, leading the ACC with 83 saves.Though Syracuse lost 5-1 in the first round of the NCAA tournament, the Orange (12-7, 3-3 ACC) beat three top-5 teams in 2019. Wins against No. 2 Duke, No. 3 Connecticut and No. 5 Louisville earned them their 11th national tournament berth under head coach Ange Bradley.Early in the season, SU relied heavily on freshman Charlotte de Vries (15 goals) on offense, but it eventually developed a more balanced attack. SU’s leading scorer finished the season on a four-game scoreless streak.SU ended its season with losses to Louisville in the ACC tournament and Princeton in the NCAA tournament. In the two postseason games combined, the Orange scored one goal.After top-2 finishes for both the men and women in their first two meets of 2019, Syracuse looked like it was rebounding from a rough finish at the NCAA Championships in 2018. Last year, the men finished 26th and the women failed to qualify.At the third meet of the season, the Orange began to slip. The men finished 24th while the women finished 25th – one of the worst regular season performances in recent history.Soon after that, top runners on both sides experienced injuries and the women didn’t qualify for the national meet. The men finished 27th of 31 teams, their lowest finish since 2008.Last season, Polina Shemanova recorded a freshman-record 447 kills as the Orange made their first NCAA tournament appearance. This season, that momentum continued for the sophomore, who had 485 kills and led the ACC in kills, kills per set, points and points per set.Though the Orange (12-13, 9-9 ACC) finished eighth in the conference after a slow start and early-season injuries, Shemanova was the driving force for SU. Head coach Leonid Yelin said he expected Shemanova to step up in the game’s most important moments.During a five-match winning streak, Shemanova won ACC Player of the Week three-straight times, averaging 25.8 kills per game in that span. The Orange upset Notre Dame and Louisville, the then-second and -third best teams in the conference, respectively. Against the Cardinals, Shemanova had a school-record 36 kills and weeks later was a unanimous selection to the All-ACC first team.Graphics made by Eva Suppa | Digital Design Editor Comments Published on December 4, 2019 at 9:33 pm Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more