Phone

+123-456-7890

Email

[email protected]

Opening Hours

Mon - Fri: 7AM - 7PM

first_imgEditorial: Illinois Utility Strives to Thwart Electricity-Generation Transition FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Dispatch and Rock Island Argus (Moline):Barely eight months after Illinois’ landmark Future Energy Jobs Act became law, Ameren Illinois wants state regulators to rewrite the rules.Critics estimate that, if the Illinois Commerce Commission accepts the lower energy savings targets contained in the efficiency plan Ameren filed with the ICC, consumers could pay 30 percent more on their bills.Meanwhile, the downstate energy provider which serves thousands in our area, will reap millions in bonuses despite not meeting the original 16 percent waste reduction target originally required by the law to trigger them.A spokesman says the utility asked for the reduction because it prefers to spend its dollars helping low-income communities. Ameren hasn’t spelled out how higher monthly bills will help those already struggling to keep the lights on, or why such a corporate cost shift is necessary given the additional low-income assistance built into the act.For those reasons and more regulators should reject Ameren’s effort to slice by more than a quarter these critical goals for cutting energy waste. ICC commissioners should do so not only for customers, but for all energy consumers in the state, those who work in the industry and for the good of the environment.As readers know, the Future Energy Jobs Act has been lauded as trailblazing state energy policy that should serve as a model for the nation. To achieve it, negotiators brought to the table such unlikely allies as energy providers, conservationists and consumer advocates.The provision that preserved Illinois nuclear energy production including at Exelon in the Quad-Cities, captured most of the headlines. But, importantly, the act also increased the use of renewable energy, protected thousand of jobs and is expected to add thousands more while promoting energy efficiency, thus decreasing — not increasing — costs to consumers.Those energy saving rules are the ones which Ameren seeks to rewrite. It’s interesting to note that ComEd has not asked for a similar reduction, despite energy savings targets which were set higher than Ameren’s. If Ameren wins the day, will a request from ComEd follow? Will it embolden utilities to ask for other changes?More: Tell the ICC not to lower energy savings targetslast_img

Recommended Articles

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *