Pro-opposition newspaper editor told: “Idiots like you will be killed one by one”


first_img RSF_en News Threats against journalists in run-up to Côte d’Ivoire’s presidential election Organisation Côte d’IvoireAfrica October 16, 2020 Find out more October 29, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Côte d’Ivoire August 23, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Pro-opposition newspaper editor told: “Idiots like you will be killed one by one” November 27, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa to go further Reports News Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders said it was appalled today by the impunity with which anonymous phone callers have been making death threats for more than a week against Eddy Péhé, the editor of the opposition daily Le Nouveau Réveil, forcing him to flee his home. “Whether under pressure or in bad faith, the Ivorian police have failed in their duty to protect citizens,” the organisation said. Côte d’IvoireAfrica Reporters Without Borders said it was appalled today by the impunity with which anonymous phone callers have been making death threats for more than a week against Eddy Péhé, the editor of the opposition daily Le Nouveau Réveil, forcing him to flee his home.”This latest episode in the grim saga endured by Côte d’Ivoire’s journalists must be taken seriously,” the organisation said. “Whether under pressure or in bad faith, the Ivorian police have failed in their duty to protect citizens, because any police force should be capable of tracking down the source of such phone calls.” Reporters Without Borders added: “A proper investigation is needed so that those responsible for these repeated threats against Péhé can be identified and brought to justice. This would show that the government is determined to enforce the rule of law.”Péhé’s newspaper supports the PDCI, which used to be the ruling single party and which is headed by former President Henri Konan Bédié. Péhé received three threatening telephone calls on his home’s fixed line on the night of 14 August. According to Péhé, the caller said:”We know where you live and where you work. You support the rebels, you don’t want them to disarm. If they still have not begun disarming on 20 August, we will start with you here. We are going to show you that it is not nice to die. And we will drink your blood, too. Do you know how we got your fixed line’s number? We know your car’s licence number. We know when you go out and when you come back. We are going to pay you a visit for a chat between men. Idiots like you who are against the regime and against the republic will be killed one by one.”Although Péhé left his home for security reasons, his family continued to receive anonymous calls during the days that followed. After asking in vain to talk to Péhé, the caller said: “Sooner or later we will find him.”As well as alerting Côte d’Ivoire’s press and journalists’ organisations, Péhé reported the threats to the ministries of internal security, defence, communication and human rights, and to the local UN mission. But the authorities have not yet taken any action. RSF’s recommendations for protecting press freedom during Côte d’Ivoire’s elections Newslast_img read more

Gardai investigating Carndonagh couple’s deaths make an appeal


first_img Twitter Gardai investigating Carndonagh couple’s deaths make an appeal By News Highland – October 24, 2014 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Previous articleGaelscoil in Strabane evacuated as police search for ‘suspicious device’Next articleMeeke drops out of contention in Spain News Highland Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+ Facebook Google+ Pinterest WhatsAppcenter_img Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Facebook 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai say they are keen to trace the movements of a vehicle as part of their investigation into deaths of Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy at their home in Churchtown, Carndonagh.A 42-year-old man, arrested by gardai investigating the deaths of the couple remains in garda custody in Buncrana. The man is understood to be the couple’s son.A hatchet found at the house is being examined as part of the investigation.Superintendent Eugene McGovern made this appeal earlier on the Shaun Doherty Show:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/supe1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Tributes continue to be paid the Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy today.Jimmy was a retired teacher while Kathleen was a retired nurse.Local Councillor Albert Doherty knew both of them personally:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/albertcuddihys.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th News Twitter Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

World Athletics says ready to shift 2021 world champs for Olympics


first_imgWorld Athletics said Monday it was prepared to shift the world championships in 2021 in order to accommodate a potential move of this year’s coronavirus-threatened Tokyo Olympic Games.The world championships are scheduled to be held in Oregon on August 6-15 next year, but talks are underway now that the 2020 Tokyo Olympics may be moved over the COVID-19 pandemic.”World Athletics welcomes discussions with the IOC to postpone the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games and has written to the IOC [International Olympics Committee] to share this feedback from the sport,” track and field’s global governing body said in a statement. “We stand ready to work with the IOC and all sport on an alternative date including dates in 2021.”World Athletics said it had already been in discussion with the Oregon 21 Organising Committee “regarding the possibility the Olympic Games may move to next year”.”They in turn have held discussions with their key stakeholders and have reassured us they will work with all of their partners and stakeholders to ensure that Oregon is able to host the World Athletics Championships on alternative dates should that prove necessary.”The IOC said Sunday it would take up to four weeks to consider what steps to take regarding the Tokyo Games.World Athletics chief Sebastian Coe said in a letter sent to IOC president Thomas Bach on Sunday that he supported the Olympics being delayed.”No one wants to see the Olympic Games postponed but as I have said publicly, we cannot hold the event at all costs, certainly not at the cost of athlete safety,” Coe said.Topics :last_img read more

Sellas Tetteh should be appointed U-20 Coach for good:Frimpong Manso


first_imgFormer Ghana coach Frimpong Manso wants Coach Sellas Tetteh to be handed over the U20 coaching job permanently.Sellas Tetteh over the last six years has established himself at the U20 level having won one gold and bronze medal at the World Cup, a gold and silver at the African Youth Championship and the West African Championship.The Former Liberty Professionals trainer made a return to the Black Satellites team after then substantive coach Maxwell Konadu was assigned to assist with the Black Stars.After Ghana’s performance at the just ended tournament in Turkey, there have been suggestions that Coach Sellas Tetteh should be given the permanent responsibility of grooming the future stars.“If we look back at 2009 and what he did and what he has done this year then I think he has got something good to offer at this level,” said former Ghana coach Frimpong Manso“For me it will be in the right direction if he’s given 4 years or more in charge of the Black Satellites team. “At the U20 level he has done very well so I will agree with anybody who says he should be given let’s say four years mandate at that level.”last_img read more

My Life as a Freedom Fighter


first_img4 April 2003Letlapa Mphahlele’s “Child of This Soil” (Kwela) is a window on events during the turbulent years of the apartheid struggle. All the hardships and suffering, the nomadic lifestyle and the unpredictable lives the freedoms fighters lived are wrapped in this moving book.Mphahlele, a cadre of the Pan Africanist Congress’s Azanian People’s Liberation Army (Apla) – having gone into exile unsure of which political organisation to join – tells in this carefully crafted book his own story during this volatile period.In exile in his quest to get military training to allow him to fight for his land, Mphahlele makes it pellucid how precariously freedom fighters lived – moving from crevice to crevice across Africa in their quest to wrench their land from the lethal jaws of apartheid.Mphahlele found it saddening how people working towards a common goal could turn on one another, showing how power struggles and lack of co-ordination took their toll on organisations fighting colonialism.Mphahlele, after brief spells in Botswana and Lesotho jails, rose through the ranks within Apla, and with his colleagues lived like hunted animals for retaliating against the massacres perpetrated on blacks by the apartheid regime.When PAC leaders called for an end to armed struggle as apartheid neared its demise, Mphahlele was incensed. He defied the call and went underground after a spate of attacks on white targets.Mphahlele concedes in his book that the struggle for liberation has been won, but wonders if people got what they fought for – especially land. And he reminds his readers that “whites can even allow an African government to run the country so long as it doesn’t interfere with their grip on land. Do you think whites can give up without a fight?”Mphahlele rebuffs the claim that he was an enemy of the state, writing that “the deadliest beasts, miles from ubuntu [humaneness], are not in the shantytowns – they are in the boardrooms of multinational companies and on the stolen farmlands”.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Dilemma, apartheid’s lost film


first_imgCD AndersonThe anti-apartheid film Dilemma (also known as A World of Strangers) is based on a novel by Nadine Gordimer, that depicts divisions and boundaries between ordinary South Africans during the early years of apartheid. The novel was banned in South Africa for 12 years.Dilemma, the 1962 docudrama by Henning Carlsen was secretly filmed in apartheid-era South Africa (pic: Getty Images) pic.twitter.com/dBYEyM7eln— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 9, 2016Filmed in South Africa by renowned Danish documentarian Henning Carlsen in 1962, the gritty black-and-white drama was filmed in secret. It offered international audiences their first glimpse behind the veil of how apartheid was taking its toll on the country.At the time, Carlsen had arrived in South Africa with a small film crew, telling government officials he was in the country to film a documentary about South African music and, bizarrely, “an industrial film about South African housewives and their refrigerators”, according to a 2013 blog post.Instead, he gathered a group of local actors, included Zakes Mokae and Evelyn Frank, to tell the story of Toby (Ivan Jackson), a wide-eyed young businessman facing difficult choices in a country in turmoil.At first oblivious to the deep-seated racial prejudices of white South Africans, Toby befriends an anti-apartheid activist (Frank) and a black South African (Mokae). Both of them, through a number of fervent discussions and clandestine visits to townships, open his eyes to the oppression of the system.The harsh realities of this divided society force him to choose between living a blissfully unaware middle class life in the suburbs or using his influence to change the system. It is a choice that itself, ultimately, has tragic consequences.Dilemma was secretly shot at various private locations around Johannesburg and Soweto, including the affluent white suburb of Sandringham and assorted Soweto shebeens. Carlsen smuggled completed film reels out of South Africa through the Danish embassy, according to the 2013 blog post, written on behalf of Frank’s son, Eddie Frank.For a detailed account of the making of the film, read the blog.In the film’s hauntingly striking opening scene, a hurried early morning commute out of the smoky haze of Soweto, accompanied by a frantic African jazz percussion soundtrack, contains jarring juxtapositions of everyday life in 1960s apartheid South Africa.Between gritty, fly-on-the-wall depictions of South African life, Dilemma contains a host of great South African music supplied by legendary jazz pianist Gideon “Mgibe” Nxumalo. There are also performances by Tandi Mpambane (Klaasen), Abigail Kubeka, Kippie Moeketsi and Wanda Makhubu.In 2008, the film’s music-rich shebeen scenes were featured in the Jazz Scores exhibition at the New York Museum of Modern Art, which celebrated jazz music and its role in film and politics. The New York Times hailed the film as “a crown jewel” of South African musical authenticity and heritage.South African actor Zakes Mokae in Dilemma, the 1962 anti-apartheid film by Henning Carlsen. pic.twitter.com/ql9gByGYkA— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 9, 2016Similar to the work of 1960s American independent cinéma vérité filmmaker John Cassavetes, Dilemma mixes ironic humour with powerful, visual elements. The improvised, urgent acting is passionate yet realistic, particularly from Mokae. He went on to build a long, illustrious career as a character actor in Hollywood until his death in 2009.Frank left South Africa shortly after the film was made, to become a respected theatre actress in Europe and the United States.Carlsen became one of Denmark’s most revered filmmakers, making films such as the award-winning social realism film The Hunger (1966) and a film version of the Gabriel García Márquez novella Memories of my Melancholy Whores in 2012. Carlsen died in 2014.Gordimer, Carlsen, Mokae and Frank reunited in 1996 to commemorate the making of the film for a Danish television documentary, titled Revisiting Johannesburg.SAfrican actors Evelyn Frank & Zakes Mokae remember the 1962 anti-apartheid film Dilemma https://t.co/KnnkU4E49k pic.twitter.com/t3dRJi1fQh— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 9, 2016Watch scenes from the film Dilemma, courtesy of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival YouTube page.A viewing and discussion of the film’s music scenes will be held at the Alliance Française Johannesburg during the September Jive South African musical heritage exhibition on 16 September 2016. For more details, visit the exhibition web page.Source: Tusker Geographica blogWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

We Get Schooled In Advanced Volleyball Metrics


Jody Avirgan: Neil, my favorite little tidbit from the the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference was the fact that each day, all the stats nerds streamed into the building toward panel discussions about sports analytics, waltzing right past — actual sports! There was a massive regional volleyball tournament taking place in the same building, and as far as I could tell, no one stopped to check it out. And, honestly, part of me thinks that it could have been an NFL game and people would have still hustled upstairs to talk about sports rather than just watch them. There was a panel discussion called “Is Analytics Taking the Fun Out of Sports.” This felt like a nice parallel to that idea.Neil Paine: “Hey, nerds — get your heads out of those volleyball spreadsheets and try watching a match!” (Said no one ever.) But seriously, the juxtaposition was interesting, particularly considering that we had the opportunity to speak with some people who do sabermetrics for volleyball. It seemed like this should have been a big moment for them — considering their sport was on display for all Sloan-ites to see — but instead it was just another smaller sport that can sometimes go neglected at an event geared more toward basketball, baseball and football.But not by us — right, Jody?Jody: Never. We contain multitudes. That said, I know next to nothing about volleyball. And while there is obvious strategy involved — you can see play fakes and how teammates work together — I hadn’t really thought about how you would evaluate the merit of particular plays. The main thing I learned from Mila Barzdukas and Giuseppe Vinci was to think about the setting pass. Is it one that leaves the team with no options but to flail and punch it over the net? Or is it a pass that multiple people could spike, from a wide range of unpredictable angles? That is, in essence, the goal of every possession — a versatile set pass. And it’s graded on a scale of 0 to 3. If you’ve got three options of attack from a given set, that’s a success.And the thing that makes it so intriguing is that the quality of the set is related to the pass before it, which is related to the serve before it. … It’s impossible to untangle each pass from the others. Which might be kind of unique among all sports, right? And, I imagine, a real metrics challenge. …Which is where I saw your wheels turning. Have we found your new beat?Neil: It’s possible. Not really having played volleyball since high school gym class, I’d never considered how oddly well-structured it is for analysis, in terms of the way each rally progresses and the fact that outcomes for individual players can be counted with relative ease. (Even at the 14- to 15-year-old level we observed, Vinci and Barzdukas insisted that coaches were tracking basic pluses and minuses — that is, positive and negative plays — for their players during matches.) It’s still not as perfectly suited to analytics as baseball (what is?), but it wouldn’t be unfair to liken it more to basketball than sports with more moving parts, such as hockey, soccer and football.The strategy of maximizing your passing options on any given setting opportunity struck me as particularly fascinating because it seems like one of those statistical best practices that can suddenly bring focus to a coach’s entire game plan. It that way, it may be much like how conserving outs should be the all-consuming imperative of a baseball offense or how resisting mid-range jumpers has become the mark of smart offensive basketball. (Even hockey has recently found a version of this: Playing dump-and-chase is the equivalent of cutting off your setter’s passing options.)The beauty of sports analytics, though, is that they’re a beginning, not an end. Finding the right strategy is just the first step in a journey that (hopefully) ends with the right players putting it to use. And with an actual volleyball tournament in such close proximity to analytics experts, both components of the odyssey were placed side-by-side, however briefly.Jody: Well said, Neil. Nice setup. Even the most grizzled volleyball coach would say you’re “passing a 3.” OK, folks, watch the video. Mila Barzdukas, Giuseppe Vinci, Neil Paine and Jody Avirgan in front of a regulation size volleyball. CORRECTION (March 10, 10:37 a.m.): An earlier version of this article mischaracterized the number of passes in a volleyball point. It’s two, not three. read more