Will Cambridge ‘Try Something New Today’?


first_imgLaura Brightman, a Natural Science fresher also championed Mr Arain’s cause claiming she would want as Chancellor, “anyone but Lord Sainsbury, we have too many of his stores opening up and one is plenty for the centre, he will just monopolise Cambridge and that is not the ideal intention of our Chancellor.”In another unexpected twist, a third nominee was suggested via a Facebook campaign, advocating the accession of Brian Blessed. The actor, author and adventurer is most famous for his thunderous voice and has starred in everything from Black Adder, to Hamlet, to Tarzan.The initiators of the nomination were Cambridge alumni, Seth Thévoz, James Ross and Stuart Moore, who claimed on the Facebook group, “The man, the myth, the legend that is the actor Brian Blessed would make an AMAZING Chancellor. Picture Brian loudly reciting the Latin at graduation ceremonies and you have some idea of what a legend Brian would be.”The group is positive that Brian Blessed is a viable choice, one member posting, along with a link to a video in which Blessed plays a policeman, “Brian Blessed is an archetypal ‘larger than life’ character who would perfectly fill the role of Chancellor at Cambridge University. With his affinity for the establishment he would serve well as a wonderful Ambassador.”When contacted by his fans about the campaign, Brian Blessed said he was, “absolutely staggered…and of course, I am delighted to accept that nomination. For me, Cambridge has always been the centre of the earth, there is a brightness and light there that rivals that on Mount Everest. The University buildings are architecturally beautiful, the whole setting is wonderful and enchants the soul. I am thrilled to be asked and wish you every success with the campaign.”One alumni on the Facebook group commented, “I am just glad that Lord Sainsbury will not run unopposed, as with his recent massive contribution to the development of the Sainsbury building on the Botanical Gardens site, it would be a shame if an unchallenged successful bid were perceived to be a ‘bought’ position.”On the other hand, Austin Mahler, an undergraduate law student at Cambridge claimed that if financial benefits could reach students he could be swayed, saying, “The prospect of student deals and potentially prices that could compete with Tesco are grounds to back Lord Sainsbury.”Another lawyer, Chris Monk commented, “’I prefer Blessed as I want a figurehead not a professional – we already have a Vice Chancellor after all.”The Senate will hold congregate in October to decide the matter and anyone with a higher degree from the University – including the MA which is an honorary degree “conferred by right” to holders of a Cambridge BA two years after their graduation – can vote.With the Brian Blessed Facebook campaign already advising alumni on whether they will need to bring gowns, and Mr Arain holding interviews with the press accompanied by his campaign managers, it is fair to say that although Baron Sainsbury is the official choice, he is certainly no longer the only one in the running. Nominations for the next Chancellor of the University of Cambridge now range from a billionaire businessman, Baron Sainsbury; to a protesting local shopkeeper, Mr Abdul Arain; to the booming Shakespearean actor, Brian Blessed. The position is currently held by HRH Prince Philip who is stepping down at the end of this month after 34 years in the job. He resigns just weeks after his ninetieth birthday, stating that as a public figure and senior member of the royal family, ‘I reckon I’ve done my bit.’At the end of May it was announced the University Nomination Board had recommended Baron Sainsbury of Turville, businessman, politician, great-grandson of the original Lord Sainsbury and an alumnus of King’s College, Cambridge, to succeed Prince Philip and become the “constitutional head of the University”.He accepted the nomination, saying he was “delighted” to be asked, and it was widely expected that he would run without competition to be named Chancellor at the beginning of July.However a week later, a grocery store owner, Mr Abdul Arain, announced plans to run against the former government minister in protest of a proposed Sainsbury’s opening on the road of his shop, Al-Amin. Comparing himself, as an “outsider”, to Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential election, he told reporters, ‘The University of Cambridge has shown great leadership on many occasions. Today, once again, the university is called upon to be the vanguard of local communities. To this end I seek nomination for the office of the Chancellor of the University of Cambridge.”Less than two weeks later, he has received the required fifty nominations from Senate members, and has been named as an official candidate.One member of the public commenting on the story proclaimed, “More power to Mr Arain’s project! Al-Amin’s is a wonderful asset to Mill Road and Cambridge. Stop the chain supermarkets from taking over the ‘convenience shop’ market! Curb uniformity and encourage real diversity! Cambridge don’t let this happen in your town!”last_img read more

Low-fat diet may cut ovarian cancer risk


first_imgSome women were assigned to cut the fat in their diets to 20percent of calories – from an average of 35 percent – while others continued their usual diets. Yet the study so far has found the diet made little impact on rates of breast cancer, colorectal cancer and heart disease.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityUntil now, the only known prescription against ovarian cancer – aside from surgically removing the ovaries – was to use birth control pills. Use for five years can lower the cancer risk by up to 60 percent, protection that lingers after pill use ends. The new findings now offer an option for postmenopausal women to try as well. Those who followed a low-fat diet for eight years cut the chance of ovarian cancer by 40percent, researchers reported Tuesday. It’s arguably the most promising finding of the Women’s Health Initiative dietary study, which enrolled tens of thousands of healthy women 50 to 79 to track the role of fat in several leading killers. By Lauran Neergaard THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON – Cutting dietary fat may also cut the risk of ovarian cancer, says a study of almost 40,000 older women that found the first hard evidence that menu changes protect against this particularly lethal cancer. But the protection didn’t kick in until the women had eaten less fat for four years. last_img read more

SC gives BCCI, Modi time to negotiate on probe panel


first_imgCan the BCCI and Lalit Modi reach a compromise on the issue of the disciplinary committee set up to probe allegations against the former IPL commissioner? At least the Supreme Court has given the two parties time till Wednesday to try and reach a deal.Modi’s lawyer Ram Jethmalani told the Supreme Court on Thursday that a compromise was possible on the issue and was being attempted.This comes even as the BCCI has outrightly rejected Modi’s demand that the disciplinary committee be reconstituted. Modi’s plea has been that the committee is biased against him.Mehmood Abdi, one of Modi’s lawyers, said: “The proposal was floated mutually by the counsels of the two sides. I hope good sense prevails upon the BCCI and they agree to it.””We want an independent panel to look into the charges against Modi,” Abdi told Headlines Today. But even as a compromise was being attempted, Abdi has hit out at BCCI secretary N. Srinivasan over a police complaint filed against the former IPL commissioner.”The government machinery in Chennai is being used against Modi, which is why the case was filed in Chennai and not Mumbai,” Abdi said.last_img read more

10 months agoCardiff confident landing Liverpool fullback Clyne – thanks to Warnock


first_imgCardiff confident landing Liverpool fullback Clyne – thanks to Warnockby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCardiff City are chasing Liverpool fullback Nathaniel Clyne.The Mirror says Cardiff are confident of winning the race to sign Clyne on loan.The 27-year-old has been back on the scene at Anfield in recent weeks but will move down the pecking order again when Joe Gomez returns to fitness.Fulham and Leicester have also shown an interest in taking the right-back next month.But Bluebirds boss Neil Warnock is hopeful that his past association with Clyne — the pair worked together at Crystal Palace — will give him the edge. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Empire Navigation In for Up to 8 MRs at Hyundai Mipo


first_imgzoomImage by WMN Greek shipowner Empire Navigation is reportedly bolstering its Medium Range (MR) tanker fleet with up to eight newbuildings.According to Fearnleys’ weekly report, the company has placed an order for four 50,000 dwt MRs with Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Mipo Dockyard.Under the deal, Empire has options to boost its order to eight units. The shipbroker did not disclose any price details, however, the firm MR quartet is set for delivery in 2020, the report said.World Maritime News is yet to receive a comment on the order from the Greek shipowner.Hyundai Mipo has been tied to an order for four 1,800 continerships from Nissen Kaiun. The ships are scheduled for completion in 2019, the shipbroker added.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Advocates say Quebec Alzheimers slaying highlights need for caregiver support


first_imgMONTREAL — Advocates for caregivers are hopeful the case of a Montreal man who killed his Alzheimer’s-stricken wife in what was described as an act of desperation, will shed some light on the plight of those struggling to care for relatives suffering from the disease.Michel Cadotte was sentenced Tuesday to two years less a day in jail for the 2017 suffocation killing of his wife, Jocelyne Lizotte, 60, who was in a long-term care facility. A jury had found him guilty earlier this year of manslaughter. He had told the court he couldn’t handle watching her suffer.The culmination of the case will hopefully alert the public to the daily struggles faced by primary caregivers, particularly those who are taking care of relatives stricken with Alzheimer’s, said Sylvie Grenier of the Quebec Federation of Alzheimer’s Societies.Grenier, who testified for the defence at sentencing, said the Cadotte case highlights the fact that relatives caring for patients with the neurodegenerative disease need to be looked after as well.“What the federation wants the public to retain from this, is all the distress faced by those who get the disease — the victim and their family,” Grenier said Wednesday. “We must support the person with the disease as well as all of those around them.”In Quebec, an estimated 145,000 people are currently suffering from Alzheimer’s and it’s a number that’s expected to spike to 260,000 by 2025.“We’re not ready for this,” said Grenier, adding that various agencies and groups are working to organize social and support services, medical care and day centres to deal with what she described as a “tsunami” of cases that are coming.Cadotte’s sentence was merited and must be denounced, Grenier said. But, she added, the case reveals how family members caring for sick relatives often live in isolation.“For those who are lucky enough not to deal with it, the impact of this disease is not something they can appreciate,” Grenier said. “They can’t understand the impact it can have on the level of distress in people.”Melanie Perroux, co-ordinator of the Regroupement des Aidants Naturels Du Quebec — an organization that represents caregivers, said she hopes the Cadotte case gives people pause to consider how taxing caregiving can be.“I think it shows us how we forget how complicated it is to take on this role and to be a caregiver on a daily basis,” Perroux said. “I really hope that within families where there are caregivers, people will stop to ask the principal caregiver: ‘How can I help you today? Can I do something for you?.”Political reaction was muted in Quebec City Wednesday. Senior ministers assigned to health and to seniors did not want to comment on the matter.Justice Minister Sonia LeBel wouldn’t comment directly on the Cadotte ruling because of the possibility of appeals.“There’s probably a societal debate to be had,” LeBel told reporters. “We can talk about how this type of situation doesn’t arise again, because there’s a sad situation at its core, the judge highlighted that in her judgment.”Sidhartha Banerjee, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Russia accused of targeting chemical weapons watchdog


first_imgBRUSSELS – The Dutch defence minister on Thursday accused Russia’s military intelligence unit of attempted cybercrimes targeting the international chemical weapons watchdog and the investigation into the 2014 Malaysian Airlines crash over Ukraine.The Dutch allegations came as British officials blamed Russia’s GRU for allegedly “brazen” activities worldwide the globe and for trying to cover up its alleged participation in the nerve agent poisoning of an ex-spy and the downing of a Malaysia Airlines plane over Ukraine. MH17. Russia has consistently denied involvement in the events.Dutch Defence Minister Ank Bijleveld said that the GRU’s alleged hacking attempts on the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons took place in April and were disrupted by authorities. Four Russian intelligence officers were immediately expelled from the Netherlands, she said.Speaking about Russia’s hacking attempts into the MH17 crash investigation, she said: “We have been aware of the interest of Russian intelligence services in this investigation and have taken appropriate measures.”“We remain very alert about this,” she said.Britain’s ambassador to the Netherlands, Peter Wilson, said the GRU would no longer be allowed to act with impunity. Britain blames the secretive military intelligence unit for the nerve agent attack in March on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the English city of Salisbury.He said Russia’s actions against the Netherlands-based OPCW came as the agency was conducting an independent analysis of the nerve agent used against the Skripals.Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova dismissed the new accusations Thursday, calling them “big fantasies.”Earlier, British Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson branded a series of global cyberattacks blamed on Russia as the reckless actions of a “pariah state,” saying that the U.K. and its NATO allies would uncover such activities in the future.“Where Russia acts in an indiscriminate and reckless way, where they have done in terms of these cyberattacks, we will be exposing them,” Williamson told reporters in Brussels at talks with U.S. Defence Secretary Jim Mattis and their NATO counterparts.His remarks came after British and Australian officials said the Russian military intelligence unit GRU is behind a wave of global cybercrimes. Britain’s National Cyber Security Center says four new attacks are associated with the GRU as well as earlier cyberattacks.It cites attacks on the World Anti-Doping Agency, Ukrainian transport systems, the 2016 U.S. presidential race and others as very likely the work of the GRU.“We are not going to be backward leaning. We are going to actually make it clear that where Russia acts, we are going to be exposing that action,” Williamson said.“This is not the actions of a great power. This is the actions of a pariah state, and we will continue working with allies to isolate them; make them understand they cannot continue to conduct themselves in such a way,” he said.Earlier, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Foreign Minister Marise Payne issued a joint statement that Australian intelligence agencies agreed that GRU “is responsible for this pattern of malicious cyber activity.” They said Australia wasn’t significantly impacted, but the cyberattacks caused economic damage and disrupted civilian infrastructure in other places.___This story has been corrected to show the chemical weapons watchdog is an international, not United Nations agency.__Gregory Katz in London and Raf Casert in Brussels contributed to this report.last_img read more

Lowes to close 31 locations across Canada


first_imgHome improvement retail giant Lowe’s has announced it will close 31 locations — mostly under the Rona banner — in Canada.In a release, the company said the stores being closed are under-performing.“While decisions that impact our associates are never easy, the store closures are a necessary step in our strategic reassessment as we focus on building a stronger business,” Marvin R. Ellison, Lowe’s president and CEO, said in a statement.“We believe our people are the foundation of our business and essential to our future growth, and we are making every effort to transition impacted associates to nearby Lowe’s stores.”Three stores in the GTA have been marked for closure: two Rona locations in Mississauga and the Lowe’s at Centrepoint Mall.In total, there are 31 sites that are closing: two regional support centers, a truss plant, a block plant and 27 stores. Within those 27 stores there are 24 RONA stores, 1 Reno-Depot store and two Lowe’s locations.Lowe’s said is expects to close the impacted stores by the end of the company’s 2018 fiscal year — Feb. 1, 2019.There has been no word on how many jobs will be lost due to these closures.In addition to the 31 Canadian locations, Lowe’s is also planning to close 20 locations in the United States.It was just over a year ago that Lowe’s bought fellow Canadian home improvement retailer Rona.For a complete list of locations in the U.S. and Canada that will be closing, click here.The story above was updated to reflect incorrect information related to the Canadian closures.last_img read more

Longest cyclone in Bay of Bengal


first_imgCyclone Fani was the longest-lived cyclone in the Bay of Bengal ever observed. The elongated time period of the storm went on for 11 days in the sea and land put together. What made it even more surprising was the fact that it had formed in the pre-monsoon season, that too in April. We had started observing it as soon as it formed in the equatorial Indian Ocean as a low-pressure area. At first, we were tracking it with the help of imagery from Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) SCATSAT-1 satellite, which gave us its exact location once every day. It also informed us on the direction and intensity of winds close to the ocean surface. Also Read – Hijacking Bapu’s legacyThis information was fed into two of our ocean-atmospheric coupled simulation models which then forecast the prospective track and intensification of the cyclone. When our simulation confirmed that the storm is becoming severe, we alerted all the state authorities like disaster management officials and also the Union Ministry of Home Affairs. When the storm transformed into a cyclone we started directly alerting the district administration, which then started provisioning and storing essential supplies. Also Read – The future is here!Our doppler weather radar at Chennai was the first to image half of the cyclone which gave us more information about its various parameters and then once it came further the radar at Machilipatnam was able to see the entire cyclone for the first time. Our forecasts became better after this. Throughout the life cycle of the cyclone, five doppler radars at Chennai, Machilipatnam, Paradip, Gopalpur, and Kolkata kept a watch on the cyclone at one time or the other. This happened for the very first time and helped us with the frequently changing track of the cyclone. By April 30, 2019, we were clear about the fact that the cyclone will move towards Odisha and make landfall. This information was sent to the authorities on the ground through bulletins every three hours, emails and WhatsApp groups. Different sets of officials have different WhatsApp groups and the alerts are sent to all these groups. Just 24 hours before landfall the bulletins were issued every hour until the actual landfall.(The author is the Director General of Meteorology, India Meteorological Department)last_img read more

We Get Schooled In Advanced Volleyball Metrics


Jody Avirgan: Neil, my favorite little tidbit from the the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference was the fact that each day, all the stats nerds streamed into the building toward panel discussions about sports analytics, waltzing right past — actual sports! There was a massive regional volleyball tournament taking place in the same building, and as far as I could tell, no one stopped to check it out. And, honestly, part of me thinks that it could have been an NFL game and people would have still hustled upstairs to talk about sports rather than just watch them. There was a panel discussion called “Is Analytics Taking the Fun Out of Sports.” This felt like a nice parallel to that idea.Neil Paine: “Hey, nerds — get your heads out of those volleyball spreadsheets and try watching a match!” (Said no one ever.) But seriously, the juxtaposition was interesting, particularly considering that we had the opportunity to speak with some people who do sabermetrics for volleyball. It seemed like this should have been a big moment for them — considering their sport was on display for all Sloan-ites to see — but instead it was just another smaller sport that can sometimes go neglected at an event geared more toward basketball, baseball and football.But not by us — right, Jody?Jody: Never. We contain multitudes. That said, I know next to nothing about volleyball. And while there is obvious strategy involved — you can see play fakes and how teammates work together — I hadn’t really thought about how you would evaluate the merit of particular plays. The main thing I learned from Mila Barzdukas and Giuseppe Vinci was to think about the setting pass. Is it one that leaves the team with no options but to flail and punch it over the net? Or is it a pass that multiple people could spike, from a wide range of unpredictable angles? That is, in essence, the goal of every possession — a versatile set pass. And it’s graded on a scale of 0 to 3. If you’ve got three options of attack from a given set, that’s a success.And the thing that makes it so intriguing is that the quality of the set is related to the pass before it, which is related to the serve before it. … It’s impossible to untangle each pass from the others. Which might be kind of unique among all sports, right? And, I imagine, a real metrics challenge. …Which is where I saw your wheels turning. Have we found your new beat?Neil: It’s possible. Not really having played volleyball since high school gym class, I’d never considered how oddly well-structured it is for analysis, in terms of the way each rally progresses and the fact that outcomes for individual players can be counted with relative ease. (Even at the 14- to 15-year-old level we observed, Vinci and Barzdukas insisted that coaches were tracking basic pluses and minuses — that is, positive and negative plays — for their players during matches.) It’s still not as perfectly suited to analytics as baseball (what is?), but it wouldn’t be unfair to liken it more to basketball than sports with more moving parts, such as hockey, soccer and football.The strategy of maximizing your passing options on any given setting opportunity struck me as particularly fascinating because it seems like one of those statistical best practices that can suddenly bring focus to a coach’s entire game plan. It that way, it may be much like how conserving outs should be the all-consuming imperative of a baseball offense or how resisting mid-range jumpers has become the mark of smart offensive basketball. (Even hockey has recently found a version of this: Playing dump-and-chase is the equivalent of cutting off your setter’s passing options.)The beauty of sports analytics, though, is that they’re a beginning, not an end. Finding the right strategy is just the first step in a journey that (hopefully) ends with the right players putting it to use. And with an actual volleyball tournament in such close proximity to analytics experts, both components of the odyssey were placed side-by-side, however briefly.Jody: Well said, Neil. Nice setup. Even the most grizzled volleyball coach would say you’re “passing a 3.” OK, folks, watch the video. Mila Barzdukas, Giuseppe Vinci, Neil Paine and Jody Avirgan in front of a regulation size volleyball. CORRECTION (March 10, 10:37 a.m.): An earlier version of this article mischaracterized the number of passes in a volleyball point. It’s two, not three. read more