Editorial: Illinois Utility Strives to Thwart Electricity-Generation Transition


first_imgEditorial: Illinois Utility Strives to Thwart Electricity-Generation Transition FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Dispatch and Rock Island Argus (Moline):Barely eight months after Illinois’ landmark Future Energy Jobs Act became law, Ameren Illinois wants state regulators to rewrite the rules.Critics estimate that, if the Illinois Commerce Commission accepts the lower energy savings targets contained in the efficiency plan Ameren filed with the ICC, consumers could pay 30 percent more on their bills.Meanwhile, the downstate energy provider which serves thousands in our area, will reap millions in bonuses despite not meeting the original 16 percent waste reduction target originally required by the law to trigger them.A spokesman says the utility asked for the reduction because it prefers to spend its dollars helping low-income communities. Ameren hasn’t spelled out how higher monthly bills will help those already struggling to keep the lights on, or why such a corporate cost shift is necessary given the additional low-income assistance built into the act.For those reasons and more regulators should reject Ameren’s effort to slice by more than a quarter these critical goals for cutting energy waste. ICC commissioners should do so not only for customers, but for all energy consumers in the state, those who work in the industry and for the good of the environment.As readers know, the Future Energy Jobs Act has been lauded as trailblazing state energy policy that should serve as a model for the nation. To achieve it, negotiators brought to the table such unlikely allies as energy providers, conservationists and consumer advocates.The provision that preserved Illinois nuclear energy production including at Exelon in the Quad-Cities, captured most of the headlines. But, importantly, the act also increased the use of renewable energy, protected thousand of jobs and is expected to add thousands more while promoting energy efficiency, thus decreasing — not increasing — costs to consumers.Those energy saving rules are the ones which Ameren seeks to rewrite. It’s interesting to note that ComEd has not asked for a similar reduction, despite energy savings targets which were set higher than Ameren’s. If Ameren wins the day, will a request from ComEd follow? Will it embolden utilities to ask for other changes?More: Tell the ICC not to lower energy savings targetslast_img read more

U.S. Says that Fighting Drug Use Reduces Violence in Latin America


first_imgBy Dialogo July 29, 2009 Mexico City, 27 July (EFE).- U.S. drug czar Gil Kerlikowske, speaking today in the Mexican capital, affirmed that preventing and treating addictions, particularly with regard to the use of narcotics, “is fundamental” for reducing violence caused by drug trafficking in Latin America. “When we put more emphasis on prevention and treatment, we’re not only helping our own country (the U.S.); we’re also helping to reduce violence” in the region, said the director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, who is on a four-day visit to Mexico. “If we cut down on the use of drugs, we will also be able to cut down on violence and crime in Mexico and in Latin America,” Kerlikowske said while touring a treatment center for addicted minors, where he was accompanied by Mexico’s first lady, Margarita Zavala, and the Mexican Secretary of Health, José Ángel Córdova. The official affirmed that U.S. policy in the fight against drugs seeks to understand, appreciate, and support work done in other countries. He commented that 20 million individuals over twelve years of age used drugs in the last month in the United States, and around 23 million Americans need treatment. “Only ten percent of these people end up in treatment, in part because it’s not available, and because people think they don’t need it,” he added. Mexico’s first lady, Margarita Zavala, agreed that the fight against drugs is fundamental because “drug use generates violence, destroys families, and destroys society.” During the event Iris Vianney Velázquez Martínez, a young patient at the New Life Center, affirmed that she is addicted to alcohol and that with the treatment she has received, she has learned how to make decisions and how to avoid hurting those she loves the most. In the country there are 320 centers like New Life which also provide outpatient services for early detection and prompt treatment of addictions.last_img read more

Show respect for the flag and stand up


first_imgRe May 29 letter, “NFL anthem stance is unAmerican”: As I understand it, Denis Brennan seems to think the “piece of cloth” (the American flag), as he puts it, is just that and that it doesn’t represent the ideals of being an American.  I would ask him to check with the family members of the thousands of men and women who lost loved ones fighting for that flag and what it represents to them. To stand for the national anthem, he says, is forced patriotism. I call it respect for what the flag means to most Americans.Linda CorteseNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesNiskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusPuccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfect Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

8 Bacolod UPV students finish quarantine


first_imgThe students, along with a couple who were also quarantined in the same facility, tested negative in the real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BACOLOD City – Eight Bacolodnon students of the University of the Philippines Visayas (UPV) were sent home after completing their mandatory 14-day quarantine at a school facility in this city. Eight students from the University of the Philippines Visayas and a couple – all residents of Bacolod City – show their certificates of completion after finishing their mandatory 14-day quarantine at a school facility on May 18. They were all transported safely to their respective homes. CINDY TAN-ROJAS The students, stranded at the UPV main campus in Miagao, Iloilo during the enhanced community quarantine, were assisted by the city government in their return here on May 5. “They all completed their 14-day mandatory quarantine (on May 18) with flying colors. All (of them) yielded negative test results for COVID-19,” councilor Cindy Rojas, chair of the action team for non-OFW returning residents, said on her Facebook post. Rojas then gave reminders to the students and the couple during the send-off which was also attended by Dr. Karen Gensoli, barangay health workers and police personnel. The second batch included 15 Bacolodnons who traveled on a special flight of the Philippine Airlines from Manila on May 9. The UPV students were part of the first batch of non-OFW returning residents assisted by the city government. Immediately after their arrival, they were brought to the Mariano G. Medalla Integrated School, which has been set up by the city government as a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patient care center for non-overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). On May 13, a total of 53 non-OFW residents of Bacolod stranded in Cebu also came home via Escalante City. Each of them received a copy of their result and a certificate of completion from the City Health Office. “Team Department of Social Services and Development prepared dinner for them, and they were all individually dropped off to their respective homes,” she added. The latest group was picked up by the city government bus and brought to the Education and Training Center School extension campus in Barangay 16 to undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine,too.(With a report from PNA/PN)last_img read more