Redknapp believes nephew Lampard will sign Chelsea contract


first_imgHarry Redknapp says he still believes Chelsea will offer Frank Lampard a new contract.The QPR manager has previously said he is convinced his nephew will end up staying at Stamford Bridge despite speculation about the midfielder’s future.Lampard’s contract expires in the summer and he has yet to be offered a new deal.But Redknapp said: “I’d be surprised if he’s not still at Chelsea next season. That’s my gut feeling.“If he’s not, there’ll be a queue of top clubs in England and the world wanting to sign him.”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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Defending league champ Arcata off to good start after win at home tournament


first_imgArcata >> Kaylie McCracken scored 18 points and Vanessa Holland added 16 as the Arcata High School girls basketball team defeated McKinleyville 68-39 in the first round of the 3rd Annual Arcata High School Girls Basketball Tournament on Thursday. With the score tied 6-6, the Tigers began to assert their will behind a hustling, full-court pressure defense that created turnovers and frustrated Mack ballhandlers.“We try to play with effort and energy and I thought at times we did that tonight,” …last_img read more

Maasai hope to bowl Cape Town over


first_imgRay Maota Ole Sonyanga Weblen Ngais and Francis Meshame, two of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, have taken to cricket like ducks to water. Ngais said that sooner or later, one or even several Maasai will play on the Kenyan national team because they have the best bowlers and   good batsmen. (Images: Maasai Cricket Warriors) MEDIA CONTACTS • Maasai Cricket Warriors  +254 723 462 373 RELATED ARTICLES • SA to host women’s cricket challenge • More international cricket for SA • Communities to enjoy cricket action • CSIR helps cricketers up their gameThe Maasai Cricket Warriors are young men from Laikipia North in Kenya and they are not your usual semi-nomad cattle herders living in the wild. They also play a mean game of cricket.The warriors in their head beads and red robes have swapped their spears and shields for protective pads and a cricket bat. They have, however, shunned the rest of the cricket gear, preferring to stay in their traditional garb while playing.The players are aiming to be role models in their communities where, as a team, they visit schools to talk about relevant social issues such as Aids prevention, the fight against female genital mutilation, polygamy and early marriage, gender equality, and alcoholism and drug addiction.They also encourage environmental protection.A visit to South AfricaThe ambitious athletes plan to participate in the second edition of the T20 Last Man Stands World Championships, which takes place in Cape Town from 31 March 2012 to 7 April, but lack of funds is hindering their preparation.The Last Man Stands tournament sees amateur teams from around the world playing several T20 group matches, followed by a knockout stage and a final.With a grand prize of US$10 000 (R77 000), the event is sure to offer great exposure to the Maasai Cricket Warriors and their cause.Maasai warrior Francis Meshame said: “It is an easy game because when you bowl it is just like throwing the spear. The pads we use are just like the shields we use when we are fighting, and the bat itself is just like the ‘rungu’, or the clubs that we use.”Andrew Ryan, a fundraiser for the Maasai Cricket Warriors, said: “The international Last Man Stands World Championships tournament will give the Maasai Warriors the opportunity to represent their country in a sport they have grown to love, while experiencing a different culture and making friends from other parts of the world.”Ryan added that the players are all very excited and they are training hard for the tournament.“This is a fantastic opportunity for them and they need all the help they can get to make their dreams come true.”Donations can be made through Ryan’s page on the Just Giving website.The gentleman’s gameCricket was introduced into Kenya during British colonial rule and although the East African country does have a national cricket team, the game was only played in the largest cities until five years ago when South African cricket enthusiast and sports managing consultant Aliya Bauer began coaching local schoolchildren in the village of Il Polei in the game.Bauer said that the older Maasai boys developed an interest in the sport while watching the younger ones play.“Teaching people a new sport they have never seen is quite challenging,” said Bauer.The lack of facilities and equipment initially hampered their progress but thanks to donations, the team is now equipped with bats, balls, gloves and pads.Bauer said: “The moranes (young Maasai warriors) learned to throw the spear when they were very young. It makes them very good bowlers.”There is also no shortage of enthusiasm for the game. One player walks 16km to the practice field and 16km back home.Team member Ole Sonyanga Weblen Ngais said: “Sooner or later, one or even several Maasai will play on the Kenyan national team because we have the best bowlers and we have good batsmen.”In 2011 trainers from Cricket Without Borders came to Laikipia and awarded several of the team’s players their official coaching diploma.Help get the team to Cape TownThe Maasai Cricket Warriors need help to participate in the week-long T20 Last Man Stands World Championships.The 25-strong team needs a total of $14 500 (R112 000), which will cover airfare, accommodation, transport and meals for the players.To make it easier to donate, the costs have been broken down as follows; to ensure that one warrior is fed for one day during the tournament, $10 (R77) is needed; $15 (R116) will accommodate and provide breakfast for one warrior for one day of the tournament; and $25 (R193) will provide a night’s hostel accommodation with three meals for one warrior.To secure a warrior’s meals for the entire tournament, $100 (R772) is needed; $250 (R1 930) will accommodate and provide lunch and dinners for one warrior for the entire tournament; while $900 (R6 948) will cover the return airfares and airport taxes for one warrior to participate in the tournament.While inCape Town they hope to visit schools and interact with South African children, spreading their message of healthy living.last_img read more

Volunteers clean up South Africa’s coastline


first_imgAn infographic showing the top 15 countries that took part in 2014’s series of clean-ups and highlighting some of the more peculiar items found either adrift at sea or on one of the planet’s many coastlines. Click image to enlarge. (Images: ICC 2015 report)Mathiba MolefeAbout 2 720 cigarette butts, 15 488 food wrappers and just over 71 000 items in total were collected by the South African volunteers during Ocean Conservancy’s series of clean-ups in 2014. Just under 12 000 kilograms of rubbish was collected along 133 kilometres of shoreline – an average of 90.22kg per kilometre.The sheer amount of waste strewn along South Africa’s coastlines and river banks has been cause for alarm for some of the country’s marine and freshwater conservationists and has led to various bodies such as Plastics South Africa and Nampak committing to playing an active role in mitigating the impact of their products on marine biology.Their efforts are compounded by those of Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy group based in Washington DC.Human rubbish has a devastating effect on ocean ecosystems. Sea birds, for example, often mistake small pieces of floating plastic, such as bottle tops, for food. The indigestible material then accumulates in their stomachs, slowly starving the birds. The result has been graphically documented by photographer Chris Jordan.Watch a short film by photographer Chris Jordan and the MidWay Film team documenting the effect marine pollution has on the delicate balance of nature:Each year for the past 29 years, hundreds of thousands of volunteers all over the world have taken time out of their day-to-day lives to head to the nearest body of water and take part in Ocean Conservancy’s global effort to remove rubbish from the planet’s coastlines and major waterways to root out the sources of the massive amount of debris that finds its way into our oceans every day.According to the conservancy’s 2015 report, in 2014 more than 7 million kilograms or 7 000 metric tons of waste were collected from the beaches and waterways of the 91 countries involved in the clean-up. Leading the pack in terms of the sheer weight of the waste collected was the USA, where volunteers picked up just under 1.9 million kilograms of rubbish from some 29 000 kilometres shoreline. This is an average of 65.5kg per kilometre.A few fascinating insights into the volume of garbage collected – and the scale of the volunteers’ global efforts. Click image for a larger view.The drive to preserve the integrity of the planet’s oceans and waterways received huge buy-in from all over the world in 2014. More than 560 000 volunteers covered a distance equivalent to 2.5 times the total length of the Great Wall of China or 509 marathons.Ocean Conservancy chief executive officer Andreas Merkl said he was thoroughly impressed by the collective effort spanning nearly three decades, making it “the largest of its kind on the planet”.“I am deeply appreciative of the men, women and children who dedicate their time to remove unsightly and dangerous trash from the ocean and the rivers, lakes and streams that flow into it, especially the 150 country and state who delivered more than 5 500 clean-ups in 2014 alone.”He also expressed his gratitude towards all of the governmental agencies, foundations and corporations that provided the funding the organisation needed to “pull off” a global clean-up of this magnitude.Estimated at more than 1.5 million pieces measuring less than 2.5cm, plastic outnumbered any other type of material collected during the year’s efforts. Foam pieces numbered just over 1.25 million and glass about 0.55 million pieces collected globally.In terms of items picked up, cigarette butts were by far the most common, with more than 2.2 million of them collected globally, almost twice as many as the second most common item, food wrappers, which numbered just under 1.4 million.According to a recent study performed by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, between five and twelve metric tons of plastics enter the ocean from inland sources.The top ten items collected globally during 2014, according to Ocean Conservancy’s 2015 report, were:Cigarette butts – 2 248 065Food wrappers – 1 376 133Plastic bottles – 988 965Plastic bottle caps – 811 871Straws and stirrers – 519 911Plastic bags e.g. bread packets – 489 968Grocery bags – 485 204Glass bottles – 396 121Beverage cans – 382 608Plastic crockery – 376 479last_img read more

Tobacco Control Act for Parliament Next Financial Year


first_imgMinister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, has committed to bringing the Tobacco Control Act to Parliament early in the next financial year. The legislation, which is in the drafting stages, seeks to protect citizens from the harmful effects of tobacco, including the banning of smoking in public and workplaces. “I am committed, as Minister, to bring by the first quarter of financial year 2013-14 a (Comprehensive) Tobacco Control Act that will deal with smoke-free work place and public space. This is something we have to look at,” he said. Dr. Ferguson, who was speaking at the National World Diabetes Day breakfast meeting at the Courtleigh Hotel in Kingston on Wednesday, said the legislation is an integral part of the Government’s bid to address the increase in non-communicable diseases. The Comprehensive Tobacco Control Act is designed to reduce demand for tobacco products over time, protect persons and the environment from tobacco smoke, and prevent the elicit supply of tobacco products. Enactment of the legislation is in keeping with obligations under the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which Jamaica ratified in July 2005. The breakfast meeting, held under the theme: ‘Diabetes Protect Our Future’, was organised by the Ministry. The Health Minister said that death and disability from diabetes and non-communicable diseases can be prevented by addressing the four main lifestyle risk factors, which are physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, tobacco use and harmful use of alcohol. He informed that one in 13 Jamaicans, aged 15-74 years old, have diabetes and one in four Jamaicans are not aware that they have the condition.  He noted that obesity is a driving factor for diabetes, and one in four Jamaicans 15-74 years old, are obese.   He said that 80 per cent of Type II diabetes is preventable by addressing the risk factors. Dr. Ferguson stated that Government is putting measures in place to encourage Jamaicans to adopt a healthier lifestyle, and has already raised excise taxes on alcohol and tobacco control.   “In keeping with the FCTC, the projection would be that tobacco tax would be somewhere in the region of 52 per cent. We, in Jamaica, are already ahead, we are somewhere in the region of 60 per cent in that regard,” he said. Dr. Ferguson said that other intervention measures include: restricting access to retail alcohol; enforcing bans on alcohol advertising; reducing salt and sugar content in packaged and prepared foods and drinks; promoting public awareness about diet and physical activity through education and consumer information; and restricting the marketing of foods and beverages high in salt, fats and sugar, especially to children. According to the Health Minister, poverty exposes persons to the main risk factors for diabetes and other non-communicable diseases. He noted further that diabetes leads to the loss of household income due to unhealthy behaviours, poor physical capacities, long-term treatment, and high cost of health care. “The epidemic is predicted to impede the poverty reduction initiatives that the Government have undertaken and the World Health Report states that 100 million people are pushed into poverty because they had to pay directly for health services,” he said.last_img read more