Muslim Teen’s Arrest In Texas Over Homemade Clock Sparks Outrage


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The arrest of a 14-year-old Muslim high school student in Texas for bringing a homemade clock to class has sparked a national uproar about Islamophobia.Mohamed Ahmed, an eighth grader at MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas, has an affinity for building electronic gadgets in his bedroom. He rose to fame overnight as social media erupted over his controversial arrest on Monday. By Wednesday afternoon, he’d been invited to meet President Obama at the White House–with the clock in hand.Ahmed’s whirlwind ordeal began when he decided to bring it to school to impress his teachers. One science teacher complimented Ahmed but warned him not to show it to anyone else. Acting on his teacher’s advice, Ahmed left it in his schoolbag. But the clock’s alarm sounded during his sixth-period English class, prompting that teacher to notify the principal and confiscate the clock, which Ahmed had built at his home in 20 minutes.“It looks like a bomb,” the teacher purportedly told Ahmed, according to the Dallas Morning News.“I told her, ‘It doesn’t look like a bomb to me,’” Ahmed replied.Ahmed was eventually led into the principal’s office with a police escort. He was handcuffed despite vehemently explaining that the presumed “bomb” was indeed a working clock, according to news reports.“We have no information that he claimed it was a bomb,” said Irving Police spokesperson James McLellan, according to the Dallas Morning News. “He kept maintaining it was a clock, but there was no broader explanation.”Following his arrest, a photo of Ahmed in handcuffs surfaced on social media. The hashtag #IStandWithAhmed became the No. 1 trending topic on Twitter Wednesday morning, featuring a bevy of support and Tweets lampooning police and school officials for what many considered an overreaction and an example of blatant American Islamophobia. Dr. Hussein Rashid, an adjunct assistant professor of religion at Hofstra University and founder of the consultancy group islamicate, L3C, which focuses on religious literacy and cultural competency, began laughing when he was asked about Ahmed’s arrest.“I’m utterly flabbergasted,” said Rashid. “You got to think about the multiple failures that had to happen here, right? A student who wants to prove he’s good in science goes to his teacher and says, ‘I am a good student.’”Rashid criticized the teacher and school administration in Texas for involving law enforcement.“It’s a perfect storm of social factors,” continued Rashid. “There’s a culture of Islamophobia, where your first thought anytime you see a brown person acting smart is that they must be a terrorist because we’ve got this long history of racism where people of color are inherently stupid. And then, so a brown, smart person is a terrorist.”When it was first revealed that the NYPD was spying on Muslim communities on Long Island, the five boroughs and in New Jersey, Muslim groups said such tactics would discourage members of the community to speak their mind, and in some cases pray at their mosque, out of fear that something they say or do could make them a target of law enforcement.“This has a real impact beyond getting eighth graders arrested for trying to impress the teacher,” Rashid added. “This has a very casual [message]: we’re all being surveyed right now.”Dr. Isma Chaudhry, president of Westbury’s Islamic Center of Long Island, was mystified when a Press reporter informed her of Ahmed’s arrest in Texas.“For how long will ethnic minorities walk on eggshells?” she asked. “That is not right. It’s counterproductive to everything, every belief, that we as Americans have. It doesn’t have to be a religious belief, but a belief in freedom of an individual living a peaceful life. Ethnic minorities have to constantly prove themselves because of a certain name or because of a skin color or because of hair color or eye color.”MacArthur High School in Irving released a statement following Ahmed’s arrest, noting that the Irving Police Department had responded to a “suspicious looking item on campus.”“We are pleased to report that after the police department’s assessment, the item discovered at school did not pose a threat to your child’s safety,” said the statement.Irving police said Wednesday that Ahmed would not face criminal charges.Ahmed, who has been bombarded with interview requests, thanked his supporters on Twitter. President Obama showed his support by inviting Ahmed—and his clock—to the White House.last_img read more

The agile dashboard


first_img This post is currently collecting data… Executives use dashboards to monitor the performance and health of our businesses. Traditional metrics like sales, revenue, margin, return on equity and total shareholder return are common and important metrics. But today, in the age of disruption, do we need different, more forward-looking metrics to indicate if our business is agile enough to win the marketplace tomorrow?The Agile Dashboard was developed to help organizations address this gap by creating a set of more forward-looking, predictive metrics centered on: speed, interactivity and pivot. This video features Joe Perfetti, innovation fellow, Duke Corporate Education, and lecturer with the RH Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland.The discussion explains why speed, the level and type of interactivity with customers and the external environment, and the ability to pivot are the building blocks of agility. It also provides the metrics for each and examples of their applicability in organizations. This is placeholder text continue reading »center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Indonesia, Colombia seek increased trade connectivity


first_imgWith Brazil, for instance, Indonesia recorded $2.9 billion of trade last year. With Peru, Indonesia recorded $271 million of trade in the same period.Connectivity is still a hindrance for Indonesia and Colombia – and in general for countries in Latin America – to engage in more fruitful economic interactions.As of now, for instance, there is no direct flight from Jakarta to Bogota, although various sectors are waiting to be explored.“A couple of days ago I received a confirmation from [Colombia’s] President Ivan Duque that he will send a result of our study regarding the opportunities for further cooperation between our countries to President Joko Widodo,” said Colombian Ambassador to Indonesia Juan Camilo Valencia in a press conference on Thursday.“Colombia and Indonesia have a geographical advantage that allows us to become a hub to connect Latin America and Southeast Asia,” he said.Valencia thought that, in Southeast Asia, Indonesia was the easiest country to relate with. In terms of their people, he said, the two nations had similar characteristics.He mentioned that if Colombia wanted to expand its Southeast Asian market, it had to be through Indonesia. “Perhaps Indonesia is thinking the same way […] That’s why it’s important that Garuda Indonesia is thinking of connecting the two regions using Bogota and Jakarta or Bali.”Separately, Darianto Harsono, the Foreign Ministry’s director for South American and Caribbean affairs, said that despite the challenges, the trade relationship between the two countries was getting stronger.“This year, the two countries will celebrate 40 years of diplomatic relations. This comes at a time when governments must work more closely because of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, more potential has been identified,” he said.“Our hope is that one day there will be a direct flight between Jakarta and Bogota to facilitate people-to-people and business-to-business contact.”Topics : As Indonesia and Colombia commemorate 40 years of diplomatic relations this year, the two countries are seeking increased connectivity between the far-flung lands, with both sides hoping to become each other’s regional trade hubs.One historical milestone for the optimistic vision was the recent repatriation of about 366 Colombian citizens from at least 19 countries on a special flight from Jakarta by Indonesian national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia.The repatriation was the first direct flight made by an Indonesian airline to Colombia. The effort was conducted from May 15 to May 17 with the help of the Indonesian Foreign Ministry and state-owned company PT Industri Nuklir Indonesia (INUKI). The company and its Colombian counterparts are exploring business opportunities in the radio-pharmacy industry.INUKI director for operations and marketing Bunjamin Noor said on Thursday that several agendas were being planned to explore opportunities in the industry, including sending INUKI’s first batch of products to the country, saying that Colombia had the potential to become the company’s hub for its Latin American regional distribution. “However, with this pandemic, we had to postpone our delivery to Colombia, but our relationship is getting stronger,” he said.Radio-pharmacy is one of many sectors that the two countries have explored. According to the Trade Ministry’s website, Indonesia and Colombia trade a number of commodities, including manufactured goods and agricultural products. However, the significant potential has been hindered by distance and limited information exchange between business players on both sides.Trade Ministry data shows that the trade volume between Indonesia and Colombia accounted for only US$153 million last year. Although the volume has increased 4.22 percent since 2015, the number is still low compared to other countries in the region.last_img read more