Free information


first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaBook stores and Web sites are filled with the latest manuals geared for both advanced and novice gardeners. But if buying the newest how-to book doesn’t fit your budget, turn to University of Georgia experts for free information online.Some 600 publications availableThe UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Web site (www.caes.uga.edu/publications) offers more than 200 research-based publications on gardening and landscaping. Another 400 publications cover subject areas ranging from how to raise horses, cattle, pigs and chickens to how to control carpenter ants and termites. To a home gardener, there’s nothing like nurturing a tomato plant and watching it produce ripe, red tomatoes. But seeing the fruit begin to rot on the vines can cause even a seasoned gardener to panic. For answers, home gardeners can turn to the CAES publications on blossom-end rot to learn how to combat this problem. View instantly or download for laterThe easiest way to find the information on the site is to do a Google search for your topic, said Amanda Swennes, the CAES publications editor who manages the collection. The Web-based publications can either be viewed online or downloaded as a PDF file. “We average about 2.5 million hits a month and 11 percent of those are from addresses outside the U.S.,” she said. The most requested publications in May were Rats and Mice – Keep Them Out of Your House and Yard, Fast-growing Shade Trees, Centipede Lawns, Camellia Culture for Home Gardeners, Dogwood Diseases and Problems, Home Garden Apples and Home Garden Strawberries. The newest or most recently updated CAES publications include Blossom-End Rot and Calcium Nutrition of Pepper and Tomato, Home Garden Blueberries, Home Garden Strawberries, Flowering Annuals and Perennials for Georgia Gardens and Growing Indoor Plants with Success.Most popular publications change with seasonsEach month Swennes keeps a record of the most popular publications. To make sure the publications remain current, Swennes asks UGA faculty to update their publications every one to three years. “This summer, we will release part two of the Native Plants for Georgia publication, which focuses on ferns,” she said. “The first one focuses on trees, shrubs and woody vines.” “Crape Myrtle Culture is usually one of our most requested publications,” she said. last_img read more

Beer: Be Grateful


first_imgCharlottesville craft beer powerhouse Starr Hill is about to release a brand new summer seasonal, Grateful Pale Ale, and we got a chance to knock out a six pack before the beer hits the shelves.Personally, I’m a sucker for anything that’s reminiscent of the heyday of Jam Bands (girls in flowy skirts, selling grilled cheese from the back of a van so you can buy beer for girls in flowy skirts…), so Grateful Pale started with a big check in the “Pro” category.The beer pours more like a pilsner than a pale, with a light straw, almost transparent color in the glass. You get a huge citrusy (grapefruit) aroma and flavor upfront followed by the typical bitterness associated with hop-heavy beers. But Grateful comes across lighter than most pale ales on the market, thanks in large part to its crisp, lean body and low alcohol content (4.7 percent abv).Now, I hate it when beer reviews stop after that first two or three initial sips. In my mind, you don’t know a beer until you hang out with it, drink several at one sitting, and then live with the consequences the next day. And this is where Grateful Pale outshines its competitors. I’m happy to say that this beer gets better and better as you move through the six pack and doesn’t leave a trace of regret the following morning, unlike many of the local pales you find out there today. I’m looking at you Wicked Weed Brewing! Bottom line: This is a session beer for American pale ale lovers, or a great intro into the hoppiness of pales and IPA’s for craft beer beginners. If you’re looking to transition a friend from the land of Blue Moon into the beautiful world of local beer, this could be your ticket.I’d say it’s my favorite beer from Starr Hill, although to be certain, I’d have to try every single beer they produce side by side…which I’m willing to do in the name of science.We got our Grateful Pale in a six-pack of bottles. If you live between Pennsylvania and South Carolina, you can do the same starting May 1, when Starr Hill releases this summer brew to the public. And here’s something else to look forward to in May—BRO is producing a feature about summer seasonal releases from local breweries, and the best outdoor bars in the South. So May is shaping up to be the best month of the year.Follow Graham Averill’s adventures in drinking and Dad-hood at daddy-drinks.comlast_img read more

Top Cop Credits Public, Officers for Uniondale Murder Suspect’s Arrest


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police arrested an alleged murder suspect in Uniondale just minutes after he fled the scene of the slaying Monday, police said.Acting on a ShotSpotter notification alerting them to the scene and 911 calls from witnesses, two officers spotted the vehicle fleeing south on Uniondale Avenue and apprehended 35-year-old Joel Arquimides Ayala Deras of Westbury, police said. He was charged with second-degree murder.The two First Precinct officers—Christopher DiGregorio and Gary Butt—also discovered shotgun casings and a .44-caliber handgun on the floor of the car. A subsequent search turned up a shotgun that police believe was used in the slaying, along with a .380-caliber handgun. The victim, 37-year-old German Ismael Saravia Melendez, was fatally shot in the head and back, acting-Nassau County Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter said at a press conference at police headquarters in Mineola Wednesday. Melendez was pronounced dead by an ambulance technician 20 minutes after the shooting.Krumpter credited the two officers for their “keen” observations while racing toward the scene of the shooting.“ShotSpotter is a great tool but without the great police work by the officers involved, the keen observation, road conditions were pretty horrific…they were able to respond in a timely fashion,” said Krumpter, who was flanked by police brass and officers Butt and DiGregorio.Investigators have yet to determine a motive for the shooting, Krumpter said. But officials did say that the two men were acquaintances and had an ongoing dispute. Neither have gang ties.The shooting occurred at 9:44 p.m. Monday, police said. Authorities were alerted to the vicinity near Macon Place and Irving Place by the ShotSpotter alert, which is activated when gunshots are registered in communities where the technology is installed. Calls to 911 and the ShotSpotter alerts came in almost simultaneously, police said.Witnesses provided police with a description of the car, and the two officers were able to act on that information almost immediately.“ShotSpotter didn’t jump off the telephone pole and arrest the defendants,” Krumpter told reporters. “In this case it was the police officers who were responding to the scene; the adrenaline’s pumping, and they’re responding to a shots fired and they were paying attention to what was going on around them on Uniondale Avenue where they observed the vehicle fleeing the scene.”Krumpter defended the department’s perceived failure to adequately alert the public to a homicide, saying the primary responsibility of the department is to conduct probes without compromising investigations.Police did not release details of the fatal shooting until late Tuesday.This is the first homicide in Nassau in 2016. The first fatal shooting in Suffolk was Jan. 17 in North Bay Shore, police said. In that case, 44-year-old Marcelo Argueta Chicas’ lifeless body was discovered with a gunshot wound. The shooting, which also registered on ShotSpotter, remains unsolved.Deras will be arraigned Wednesday at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more