Ocean City’s $11.3 Billion in Total Real Estate Value Back on the Rise


first_imgA town with a year-round population of just 11,701, Ocean City has the fourth highest combined real estate value of any municipality in New Jersey.Only 56 Ocean City property owners filed tax appeals this year. They reduced the assessed value of their properties by a combined $3.8 million.Those appeals come just two years after 829 tax appeals wiped $108 million of taxable value off the boards in Ocean City and three years after 641 appeals reduced ratables by another $100 million.At the same time, Ocean City is wrapping up a multiyear in-house program that has pro-actively reassessed property values on almost 17,000 of the city’s approximately 19,275 taxable properties. The “compliance plan” reduced combined tax assessments by more than $1 billion.At last, Ocean City’s assessed values appear to be more in line with market values.The net effect of the changes?A stabilized tax rate for all Ocean City property owners.The City of Ocean City and the Ocean City Board of Education in recent years have held tax increases to about 2 percent or below. But with less property value to tax, Ocean City had to increase the tax rate more substantially — even just to collect close to the same overall amount in taxes.Taxpayers shared the tax burden unevenly. The owners who had their property values reassessed in any given year likely paid less in taxes, while those who didn’t paid more.When the overall ratable base falls, tax rates become inflated, Ocean City Finance Director Frank Donato said. It has the opposite effect when the ratable base increases.With tax appeals and reassessments stabilized, and with new construction and rehabilitations on the rise, Donato estimates Ocean City could see more than $100 million in new real estate value this year.That would reverse a trend that saw Ocean City’s overall ratable base fall from about $12.9 billion four years ago to $11.3 billion today. And that would likely lead to relatively stable tax rates.Even with the decrease in the ratable base, Ocean City still has the fourth highest combined real estate value of any municipality in the state of New Jersey. (With a year-round population of 11,701, Ocean City is just the 83rd most populous city in the state.)See the following rankings for 2013 from a state Department of Community Affairs abstract of ratables:Atlantic City: $14.4 billionNewark: $13 billionToms River:$11.4 billionOcean City: $11.3 billionBrick Township: $10.2 billionMiddletown Township (Monmouth County): $9.8 billionFranklin Township (Somerset County): $8.7 billionPaterson (Passaic County): $8.5 billionMillburn Township (Essex County): $8.1 billionBridgewater Township (Somerset County): $8.1 billionThe rankings also include: No. 14, Avalon, $7.3 billion; No. 41, Sea Isle City, $4.9 billion; No. 45, Stone Harbor, $4.4 billion; No. 102, Cape May, $2.8 billion.Donato said the compliance plan “might not be completely done.”  The city has until Oct. 1 to apply to the county to reassess more properties. But with the vast majority of properties already complete, the effect on the ratable base would not be substantial.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

Congrats to George Takei & Lea Salonga as Allegiance Officially Opens


first_img Allegiance View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 14, 2016center_img George Takei, Lea Salonga, Telly Leung and more will pledge their Allegiance as they officially open in the new tuner on November 8. Directed by Stafford Arima, the production, which is based on Takei’s childhood experience in a Japanese-American interment camp, is playing at Broadway’s Longacre Theatre.To celebrate the Great White Way premiere of this tale of family, love and patriotism set during World War II and beyond, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson penned this portrait. In addition to the leading trio, the sketch features Katie Rose Clarke, Michael K. Lee, Christopheren Nomura and Greg Watanabe, along with a few “wishes on the wind.”Oh my! Broadway.com wishes the cast a happy opening! Related Showslast_img read more

Vermont firm gets $190,000 for career training and housing assistance of migrant farmworkers


first_imgTelamon Corp.S.C.$966,905 PathStone Corp.Pa.$1,544,889 Telamon Corp.Md./Del.$489,431 United Migrant Opportunity Services/UMOS Inc.Wis.$1,250,652 Telamon Corp.W.Va.$196,339 County of KernCalif.$2,107,959 Central Valley Opportunity Center Inc.Calif.$1,927,835 PathStone Corp.Vt.$190,798 Kentucky Farmworker Programs Inc.Ky.$1,210,852 Proteus Inc.Calif.$3,950,219 The US Department of Labor today announced $83,941,360 in grants through the National Farmworker Jobs Program to combat the chronic unemployment and underemployment experienced by migrant and seasonal farmworkers who depend primarily on agricultural labor jobs. PathStone Corp of Jeffersonville received $190,798. A total of $78,253,180 will go to 52 organizations nationwide to provide training, employment and support services for farmworkers and their families. An additional $5,688,600 will go to 16 organizations to provide temporary or permanent housing assistance.The National Farmworker Jobs Program helps eligible workers improve their agricultural job skills, and train for careers in emerging industries and occupations that offer higher wages and more stable employment.  The program also offers services such as child care, health care and transportation assistance.”Agricultural workers face significant barriers to stable employment, and all too often it is their families who pay the price,” said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis. “These grants address this reality by not only helping workers improve and expand their job skills, but also by providing housing and other crucial support services.”The housing assistance grants will provide permanent housing assistance, temporary and/or emergency housing assistance, or a combination of both.  Permanent housing assistance services include pre-development and development services; project management; and resource development to secure acquisition, construction or renovation, and other operating funds for farmworker housing.  Temporary housing assistance services include housing units for temporary occupancy, the management of such housing units, emergency housing payments and case management. Services typically are provided in more than one state or areas of a single state.The National Farmworker Jobs Program is authorized by Congress in Section 167 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, and grants are allocated through a formula that estimates the number of eligible workers in each state or territory. Puerto Rico and 45 states each have one grantee. California has five grantees.  There are no grantees in Alaska. Connecticut and Rhode Island are considered a combined service delivery area, as are Maryland and Delaware.  The grants cover a two-year period but are funded on an annual basis.  The awards announced today are for July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012.  Second year allocations will be dependent on the funds available through the fiscal year 2012 appropriations process and on grantees’ compliance with all current and future departmental guidance.Editor’s Note: A chart listing the grantees, their locations and award amounts follows this news release.National Farmworker Jobs Program Grant Awards New England Farm Workers’ CouncilConn./R.I.$391,109 New England Farm Workers’ CouncilMass.$322,032 Illinois Migrant CouncilIll.$1,437,203 OIC of WashingtonWash.$3,090,088 WASHINGTON, June 29, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Motivation Education & Training Inc.Minn.$1,234,045 Telamon Corp.Ind.$923,526 ORO Development Corp.Okla.$1,272,692 New England Farm Workers’ CouncilN.H.$101,931 Oregon Human Development Corp.Ore.$1,971,923 Telamon Corp.Ga.$1,532,229 California Human Development Corp.Calif.$3,790,340 Florida Department of EducationFla.$4,146,020 Tennessee Opportunity Programs Inc.Tenn.$857,418 Telamon Corp.Mich.$1,399,272 Oregon Human Development Corp.Nev.$179,751 PathStone Corp.Puerto Rico$3,058,359 Motivation Education & Training Inc.Texas$6,673,042 HELP – New Mexico Inc.N.M.$946,732 $78,253,180.00 TOTAL Motivation Education & Training Inc.Neb.$1,088,204 United Migrant Opportunity Services/UMOS Inc.Mo.$985,854 Eastern Maine Development Corp.Maine$293,084 Motivation Education & Training Inc.N.D.$607,492 Arkansas Human Development Corp.Ark.$1,144,854 PathStone Corp.N.Y.$1,656,708 PathStone Corp.Ohio$1,259,904 Telamon Corp.Ala.$791,926 PathStone Corp.N.J.$696,249 Black hills Special Services CooperativeS.D.$620,254 Telamon Corp.N.C.$2,690,959 GranteeStateAmount Proteus Inc.Iowa$1,176,640 Portable Practical Educational Preparation Inc.Ariz.$2,132,576 Mississippi Delta Council for Farm Workers OpportunitiesMiss.$1,297,176 Telamon Corp.Va.$927,817 PIC Inc.Utah$289,213 Center for Employment TrainingCalif.$8,208,464 Community Council of Idaho Inc.Idaho$1,074,827 Motivation Education & Training Inc.Wyo.$233,936 Rural Employment Opportunities Inc.Mont.$597,263 Maui Economic Opportunity Inc.Hawaii$330,485 Rocky Mountain SER/Jobs for Progress Inc.Colo.$999,986 SER Corp. of KansasKan.$1,074,936 Motivation Education & Training Inc.La.$910,782last_img read more

Researchers warn of resistant flu, foodborne microbes


first_imgMar 19, 2008 – ATLANTA (CIDRAP News) – Serious microbial threats, including drug-resistant influenza and foodborne pathogens, remain stubbornly persistent even as unpredictable new threats are emerging, researchers said this week at the leading international conference on new and resurgent infectious diseases.Many of the threats are emerging in parts of the world too poor to fund adequate surveillance and control measures. And industrialized countries’ spending on intercepting those globalized infections is not keeping pace with the need.”Many of the challenges that face us right now are not likely to get better; in some ways, they are likely to get worse,” Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said during the opening speeches of the International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, which the CDC sponsors along with several scientific organizations. “These problems can only be solved by the investment necessary to tackle them.”Research presented at the conference ranged from information on the complexities of controlling and treating influenza and other respiratory diseases to insights into foodborne disease transmission. And as always at such a large conference—a biennial gathering of 2,000 scientists giving roughly 500 papers and posters—there were the scientific equivalent of early-warning alarms.In influenza news, CDC and state health department researchers found that:Adamantane drugs, the older of the two classes of influenza antivirals, are becoming increasingly useless against seasonal flu. A global survey of isolates collected during the 2006-07 flu season found 72% of H3N2 strains were resistant to adamantanes; in Asia, 100 percent of H1N1 strains were resistant, though 94% of US H1N1 strains remained vulnerable to the drugs.Meanwhile, resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors, the second class of flu drug, is creeping up. Between 2004 and the current flu season, the proportion of isolates resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors rose from 1% to 5% among all flu strains. Resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the more widely used drug in the class, rose to 9% among H1N1 strains.And in further confirmation that the current seasonal flu vaccine did not work as planned, an analysis of military flu-like illness statistics by the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego found the effectiveness of the flu shot against H1N1 strains was 71%, lower than recent CDC estimates.In a warning of the stealthy nature of novel flu strains, a team from the University of Florida, the CDC’s flu branch, and a pet-rescue program called HemoPet/Pet Life-Line found that canine influenza has been circulating without detection far longer than supposed. The disease, which kills by hemorrhagic pneumonia, was first detected in dogs in Florida in 2004 and has since spread to 25 states and Washington, DC. But according to the rescue program’s blood-donor records, the strain has actually been in Florida dogs since 1999, and it may have caused unsolved respiratory disease outbreaks at dog tracks that year and in 2003.Among the reports on foodborne illnesses:The proportion of disease outbreaks linked to leafy greens is rising faster than the consumption of lettuce and spinach, signaling a true increase in the incidence of greens-related foodborne illness, according to CDC researchers.Strains of Salmonella isolated from cattle slaughtered at plants monitored by the US Department of Agriculture showed significant increases between 1997 and 2005 in resistance to cephalosporins, a class of drugs used in both veterinary and human medicine. Proportions of isolates resistant to the veterinary drug ceftriaxone increased from 1% to 2.1%; to ceftiofur, from 0% to 21.6%; and to cefoxitin, from 9.1% to 19.8%.And research done at the University of Pennsylvania found that 22% of raw chicken purchased at retail outlets in central Pennsylvania in 2006 and 2007 was contaminated with Salmonella; 53% of the Salmonella isolates were resistant to at least one drug, and 45% were resistant to five drugs or more.Blood and organ transplants are emerging as a rare and unpredictable route for transmission of infections, according to research presented at the conference, which featured reports of tuberculosis transmitted via transplant and fatal Group C streptococcal infection transmitted by transfused pooled platelets.And in just two of many reports on the increasingly high-profile pathogen MRSA—methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which causes both healthcare-acquired and community-acquired infections—CDC researchers reported a higher-than-predicted rate of community-acquired pneumonias due to MRSA. In addition, Dr. J. Scott Weese, a veterinarian from the Ontario Veterinary College, delivered preliminary results of a survey of 212 raw pork products purchased in four Canadian provinces that found a MRSA contamination rate of almost 10%.last_img read more