George Clinton Dubs Thundercat, Flying Lotus, Kendrick Lamar “The New Generation Of Funk Musicians”


first_imgGeorge Clinton has been one of the most well-known names in the funk world for decades, carving out a unique space in the mainstream for funk music with Parliament and Funkadelic, often referred to as the collective Parliament-Funkadelic (or P-Funk). While Clinton has been a larger-than-life figure in funk for years, he’s never been too set in his old ways, frequently allowing his approach and his repertoire to include new and innovative collaborators.In recent years, George Clinton has forged a creative relationship with experimental producer Flying Lotus and his L.A.-based Brainfeeder label, which ranks other neo-funk forerunners like Thundercat on its artist roster. During that time, he’s also collaborated with the likes of hip-hop superstar Kendrick Lamar, contributing to the Compton rappers highly lauded 2015 album, To Pimp A Butterfly, alongside other L.A. scene associates like Terrace Martin, Kamasi Washington, and more. He even welcomed Kendrick and Ice Cube on a remix of Funkadelic’s “Ain’t That Funkin’ Kinda Hard on You” in 2016.George Clinton & Funkadelic ft. Kendrick Lamar, Ice Cube – “Ain’t That Funkin’ Kinda Hard On You”[Video: GeorgeClintonVEVO]George Clinton is not the only legacy artist that’s been influenced by this jazz-funk-hip-hop new guard. Herbie Hancock is notably working on a new album that will feature Kendrick, Thundercat, Flying Lotus, Kamasi, and other contemporary artists of their ilk.In a recent Reddit AMA session, one fan asked Dr. Funkenstein what it was like working with Flying Lotus. This was his response:He reminds me so much of when Bootsy [Collins] first came around. Thundercat, Steve [Flying Lotus] and the whole crew. Kendrick Lamar, it feels so much like 1975 when Bootsy first came around and started mixing James Brown with P-Funk. The same thing is happening with Flying Lotus, and it’s putting me in touch with so many new musicians. These are the new generation of funk musicians. So, it’s educational working with him. It’s a whole new version of ourselves. George Clinton’s high praise for artists like Kendrick Lamar is nothing new. He’s been praising his abilities for years. When To Pimp A Butterfly came out in 2015, Clinton told Pigeons & Planes,I wasn’t surprised that the album came out sounding the way it did. I could tell from the song I did with him, the way he was talking and his interpretation of funk, that it was going to be something new. Kendrick told me respect was going to be paid to the funk. …He’s number one right now! It’s hard as hell to be in that position with so much attention, but he’s got a good team around him. It’s hard to deal with and still try to be creative at the same time, but he has that in check. The only other person I’ve seen do it like that before is Prince! It’s a crazy amount of pressure, but for me, I learned the value of playing crazy—people think you’re crazy, they don’t bother you as much. Kendrick’s got a mission set out for him, I don’t know if he fully realizes it yet but it’s there.These days, the funk “genre” is thriving beyond the mainstream, with bands like Lettuce, Turkuaz, Galactic, The Motet, and many more continuing to make strides and earn consistently bigger audiences in their respective spaces. Pop artists like Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson have also garnered immense commercial success with their funk-infused brand of pop, and funk pioneers like the surviving members of The Meters still doing their thing on various projects. Most people wouldn’t put artists like Kendrick and Flying Lotus in the “funk” category at all, let alone refer to them as its future.But the way George Clinton has always seen it, funk is less of a genre and more of an approach, a feel. Clinton has always been one to move beyond the comfort zone of his “genre,” and is fully aware of that aspect of music’s evolution, particularly after moving toward psychedelia and away from more traditional “funk” as his career went on. As he noted in a 2015 interview with Noisey,Any time you go pop or cross over, you already begin to lose the audience that you started out with. It just so happened that the black music became the pop music of the next generation. What’s really black for ten years becomes really pop the next ten years. With rock ‘n’ roll, a lot of black people think it’s white music totally. They don’t know about Little Richard and Chuck Berry. The only thing they know is that Jimi Hendrix played some psychedelic. So yeah, you lose your audience if you go from one audience to the next. Most of the black music you get today—hip-hop—it’s totally pop. Considering his experiences and familiarity with “funk music,” its constant evolution, and the artists he notes as representing its new guard, Clinton certainly makes a compelling point about the artists he sees as “the new generation of funk musicians.”[H/T OkayPlayer]last_img read more

Lecture explores string theory


first_imgString theory, a so-called “theory of everything” in physics, is a popular topic among more than just scientists. Juan Maldacena, professor of theoretical and astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study and one of the foremost researchers in the field of string theory, delivered a lecture Wednesday on the subject of chromodynamics, string theory and black holes. Maldacena is most well-known for his 1997 paper on the large N limit of superconformal field theories and supergravity, which is the most-cited high energy physics paper of all time. Maldacena began his talk by discussing the close relationship between quantum chromodynamics, a type of quantum field theory, and gravity theories, namely quantum gravity. “The equality between these two things would be that the quantum field theory living on some space is equal to the quantum gravity living in the interior of that space,” Maldacena said. “The idea is that the physics in the interior can be described by the physics that happens on the boundary.” In particular, Maldacena discussed supersymmetric versions of this theory using the maximum number of supersymmetries, although these versions are difficult to experimentally confirm. One of the reasons for the maximum supersymmetry assumption in the theory is that is greatly simplifies the case and makes complicated physics a more tractable problem, Maldacena said. “There’s this joke about a farmer who had a cow, and he needed to increase milk production,” Maldacena said. “So he hires a veterinarian and a physicist to help him and the veterinarian tells him, ‘Well you should feed the cows better, exercise, blah, blah, blah.’ And then the physicist says, ‘Well, let’s first assume that we have a spherical cow.’ So this theory can be called a hyperbolic cow.” In order to work out these theories, Maldacena used anti-de Sitter’s space, which comes from the de Sitter space used to describe cosmological expansion. “In some sense, anti-de Sitter space is like a gravitational box that does not allow massive particles to reach the boundaries,” Maldacena said. “So if you sit in the middle of anti-de Sitter space and you throw a rock, after awhile the rock will come back to you. If you shoot a gun, then that’s not a very good idea.” Using this approach, a natural duality arises between quantum field and gravity theories, which allows researchers to investigate fundamental questions in physics, he said. “Duality in this relationship means, ‘Take some parameter, and when the parameter takes some set of values, say small ones, then one description is easy,’” Maldacena said. “‘Then if it takes another set of values, let’s large ones, then the other description is simple.’” When looking at systems of weakly-interacting gluons, essentially free ones, the string theory is the simplest description. When there are strongly-interacting gluons, the problem is still well-defined but difficult to analyze with string theory, in which case gravitational descriptions are better because the radius in the space is much larger. This leads to a good approximation of more complicated string theory by relatively simple gravity ones, Maldacena said. “The good thing that gravity does for us is it allows us to solve the quantum field theory in a simple way,” Maldacena said. “However, there are things that we can learn about gravity from the field theory. A particularly interesting thing is that it’s useful for understanding quantum aspects of a black hole.” Black holes are gravitational collapses, where nothing can escape once the event horizon, a sort of boundary of the black hole, is passed, Maldacena said. But according to quantum dynamics, they can emit radiation, where the temperature at which the radiation is emitted is inversely proportional to the size of the black hole. “This effect implies that the smaller you make the black hole, the hotter the temperature is,” he said. “You can have the paradoxical equation of a black hole that can be white. So you have white black holes.” In physics the notion is that whenever there’s a temperature, something is moving, Maldacena said, and one of the hot questions in the field is to describe what goes on in the interior of a black hole. Maldacena said these complex descriptions of black holes can also be applied in a more generalized way to hydrodynamics, underscoring the fundamental nature of his research and the discipline of physics as a whole. “As physicists, one of the laws of physics is that you take a problem and investigate by making it simpler,” Maldacena said.last_img read more

Chelsea, Barcelona and Manchester City all want Miralem Pjanic


first_imgChelsea, Barcelona and Manchester City all want Miralem Pjanic, but it’d take a bid of over €80m to bring Juventus to to the table, reports say.The Bosnian international is a key part of Massimiliano Allegri’s side, and has so far given no indication that he wants to be sold.Indeed, this morning’s Gazzetta dello Sport reports that the midfielder is excited to play with Cristiano Ronaldo, and has been offered a new €6m per season deal in Turin.That doesn’t completely rule out a sale though, with interest from Chelsea, Manchester City and Barcelona.Juve don’t want to sell, but would at least listen to offers above €80m.If Pjanic were to leave, the Bianconeri would look at Adrien Rabiot of Paris Saint-Germain, whose contract expires in the summer of 2019.(Source: klix)last_img read more