Haiti to pay mothers school incentives via mobile


first_imgNewsRegional Haiti to pay mothers school incentives via mobile by: – May 29, 2012 Tweet Share Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Share 7 Views   no discussions The earthquake of January 2010 devastated much of Port-au-PrinceThe government in Haiti says it will begin transferring cash credits to mothers who send their children to school regularly.Each mother will receive up to $20 (£13) a month and the transfers will be made via mobile phone. The programme, called Ti Manman Cheri, or Dear Little Mother, aims to benefit initially a 100,000 families in the capital, Port-au-Prince. Venezuela is providing $15m (£9.5m) for the first phase of the programme.Other Latin American countries, such as Brazil and Mexico, have adopted schemes that provide benefits to families who keep their children in education.But the Haitian government says this is the first such initiative to use mobile phones for cash transfers. Prime minister Laurent Lamothe said the programme represented “a revolution in the country.”It will initially benefit families in four of the poorest areas of Port-au-Prince and should be extended to the rest of the country by the end of the year.Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the western hemisphere.It suffered huge human and material losses when it was hit by an earthquake in 2010.BBC Newslast_img read more

Cricket News Ravichandran Ashwin hopes for an interesting duel with Nathan Lyon in Australia Tests


first_imgNew Delhi: The upcoming clash between Australia and India will also be the clash of two of the best spinners in the world in Ravichandran Ashwin and Nathan Lyon. Both bowlers, who made their Test debuts in 2011, have achieved tremendous success for their sides in the last couple of years. Lyon has produced memorable spells against India, including his 12-wicket haul in Adelaide in 2014/15 which helped Australia to a memorable 48-run win. Speaking after the end of the third day between Cricket Australia XI and India, Ashwin admitted he admires Lyon’s ability and can learn a thing or two in the upcoming four-Test series beginning on December 6 in Adelaide.Read More |KL Rahul finds new ways to get out: Sanjay Bangar“I also watch his videos. We started our Test careers at the same time so obviously mutual admiration is there. He has done well over the last couple years and he is bowling well. The ball is coming out well off his hand. What can I learn? Probably drop the ball at the right spots and probably as the series goes on look forward to a good competition,” Ashwin said.Read More |Ricky Ponting makes bold prediction for Australia vs India TestsAustralia has been plagued by off-field issues ever since the ball-tampering scandal in Cape Town. With no Steve Smith and David Warner in the side, the batting is weak and results have not gone their way. India have a chance to break their jinx Down Under but Ashwin brushes off the favorites tag for Virat Kohli’s side.“The whole talk about India starting favourites, even when Australia came to India they were talking us up, and it looks like more of a strategy for us. I personally think you have to go one day at a time. It’s never easy to come over to Australia and win series.  In the Ashes they almost whitewashed England, knocked them over, and so as far as I’m concerned they are starting favourites,” Ashwin said.Prepared for long haulThe offspinner has said the nature of wickets in Australia is pretty flat and it won’t be easy to run through the opposition. The nature of pitches in England and South Africa helped the bowlers a lot but Ashwin admits India have to maintain the intensity every hour and on an everyday basis in order to achieve success.“You don’t turn up to Australia thinking wickets are going to seam or spin around. They are always going to be flat we know that. It’s more about getting your noses ahead in Australia. Every hour, the game can get away from you really fast in the field. We have some quality batsmen who can take the game away from them.  It’s very important to soak together good partnerships as a bowling group then try and knock them over. You won’t blow oppositions away. It might happen once in a while but you have to get your noses ahead and keep it ahead,” Ashwin stated.The Tamil Nadu bowler was happy with his performance with the ball in the warm-up game against Cricket Australia XI as the hosts ended the third day on 356/6, trailing Virat Kohli’s side by two runs. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

World Test Championship proceeding as planned


first_img(ESPNCRICINFO) – The fate of the T20 World Cup out of the way, the ICC’s attention now turns to the World Test Championship (WTC) and in particular, the six-Test series postponed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Progress will not be quick, cautioned the ICC, but for now, matters are proceeding as planned.The very first WTC was due to be completed by the end of March 2021, each of the nine sides having played six series home and away over a two-year period.The top two sides would then play a final, planned for next summer in the UK. But that schedule has been thrown into disarray because of the impact of the pandemic, and only now are members working out ways with the ICC to reschedule their commitments.Priority at the moment is on the six series already postponed: Sri Lanka vs England, one Test between Pakistan and Bangladesh, Bangladesh vs Australia, West Indies vs South Africa, Sri Lanka vs Bangladesh and Bangladesh vs New Zealand.“We’re in discussions with the members now with rescheduling of the series that have been postponed to date,” Geoff Allardice, the ICC’s general manager cricket operations, said.“With the English summer looking like getting both the Test series through, the next ones I know there’s been some talk in the media about West Indies v South Africa looking to find a suitable time. But outside that series, the next scheduled ones are in late November in New Zealand. So, the focus will come back on the six postponed series and when they might be able to be replayed.“With some of them, discussions are underway but we’re in the process of getting updates from all member countries as to what they’re looking at. At the moment, everything is proceeding as planned. The series on in England right now are part of the WTC and all of the series that have been identified will be part of the Championships. It’s about getting a feel for whether they can all be completed within the competition window ending in March next year.”But given the fluid nature of the impacts of the pandemic – with some countries still to reach a peak and others experiencing, or on the verge of, an expected second wave – decisions won’t be taken quickly. Unlike with the T20 World Cup, which was eventually postponed earlier this month, there isn’t a pressing need for a cut-off date by which decisions need to be taken.“In the last few months, we’ve learned that things change quite quickly,” Allardice said. “One week you think that you’re not going to play for a while and then things begin to open up at a government level and then all of a sudden, things look possible.“A lot of the series we are talking about, if we are saying November-December, January-February, they are six to eight months away and it’s still hard to predict where things will be in some countries that far out. We haven’t got a firm drop-dead date in mind.“We are going to get a feel in the next month or two from member countries about when they’ll be able to resume and what their upcoming seasons look like, including the matches and series they need to reschedule that have been postponed.”The next cycle of international cricket could also see efforts made to include an international T20 league in the calendar. The idea was discussed during the planning stages for this cycle but the constraints of the existing FTP meant it went no further.“It was something that was discussed at length and continues to be talked about in terms of how do you achieve it practically,” Allardice said. “What is the right number of teams, the format of the competition? Sometimes you couple ODIs series with Test series, so how do you do something different without making the league the same number of teams against the same opponents but in T20Is as well?“Ideally you’d like to incorporate more teams in a Twenty20 structure. Given the constraints of the FTP we were looking at a few years ago, it was a bridge too far then but that doesn’t mean it won’t be on the things we’re trying to achieve in the next calendar.”last_img read more