Trusted voice among leaders in higher education


first_img Members of Harvard community, from deans to faculty to students, respond to naming of next president Related Explains who he is, how he’s learned, what he values Last summer, Trinity College was engulfed in a firestorm after a faculty member released a tweet that some interpreted as saying that bigots should not be aided by emergency responders who are minorities and instead be left to die.Joanne Berger-Sweeney, president of the Hartford, Conn., college, was blindsided by the controversy, which rapidly escalated, fanned by conservative outrage at liberal campus views on one side and by fears of white supremacist movements on the other. The outcry grew, resulting in death threats against the professor, who left the state with his family, and the closure of campus for a day due to safety concerns.As tensions rose, Berger-Sweeney, president of the school since 2014, needed someone to talk to about a situation that isn’t in any leadership textbook. She called Larry Bacow.“Being a president is hard,” Berger-Sweeney said. “You run into things that you have never seen before. I first heard about it on a Monday. On Tuesday morning I called Larry to say, ‘OK, I don’t know who else I can talk to. Just help walk me through this.’”Lawrence S. Bacow, who was named Harvard’s 29th president on Sunday, has a reputation as someone fellow leaders seek out for advice. Berger-Sweeney, who first met Bacow when he was the president of Tufts University and she was the school’s dean for arts and sciences, said she was delighted when she heard the Harvard news. A storm of emails from former Tufts colleagues showed she was not alone.“Being a president is hard. You run into things that you have never seen before,” said Trinity College President Joanne Berger-Sweeney, who turned to Lawrence Bacow when a controversy hit her campus. Photo by Al Ferreira Photography“I got the email yesterday, I was in the car,” she said. “Luckily my husband was driving or I’m sure I would have had an accident. I was thrilled.”When she spoke with Bacow last summer, Berger-Sweeney recalled, he didn’t tell her what to do, but rather asked questions that helped shine a light on the problem and guided her through its most important dimensions.“He just gives such sound, reasonable advice,” Berger-Sweeney said. “He doesn’t tell you what to do, but asks questions that lead you to … understand how you might approach a situation.”In naming Bacow the University’s next president, Harvard leaders cited wide respect for his wisdom and counsel among his qualifications. “He is someone other leaders across higher education look to for advice on leadership and solving hard problems,” Bill Lee, senior fellow of the Harvard Corporation and chair of the presidential search committee, said as he introduced Bacow.Former Princeton president Shirley Tilghman, who as a Corporation member has served alongside Bacow, praised the choice.“Larry Bacow brings an extraordinary combination of broad experience in academia, deep knowledge of Harvard, and that intangible quality, wisdom,” Tilghman said in a statement Sunday. “I have been struck during the years I have served with him on the Corporation by his generosity to many leaders, both inside and outside Harvard, who regularly turn to him for thoughtful counsel.”Danoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana, who was paired with Bacow as part of a Corporation initiative linking senior leaders with deans, said that Bacow was helpful as both a coach and a sounding board. That was at least in part because he has such high standards about what an institution of higher education should be, Khurana said. In addition, Khurana said, Bacow was never too busy to talk.,“He always made himself available and was willing to invest time and effort,” Khurana said. “He’s somebody who demonstrates how important good listening is and who knows how powerful empathizing can be for someone. What you could see is what an extraordinary teacher he is. … I always thought about him as one of the real statespeople of higher education.”Bacow’s willingness to act as a sounding board for colleagues extends back to his time on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, according to Robert Birgeneau, who has served as chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, and president of the University of Toronto, and knew Bacow when they were both MIT professors.During the late 1990s, Birgeneau said, he asked Bacow and a handful of other MIT faculty leaders to gather and discuss academic issues in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences. The six scholars hit it off enough to continue to meet every few months. The discussion expanded over the years as their careers evolved to include broader issues important to higher education.When Birgeneau was Berkeley’s chancellor and Bacow was Tufts’ president, each provided the other with insight that was difficult to find elsewhere.“I found meeting with this group — including Larry in particular because he was also a university leader — invaluable, because it was a set of very smart people who cared deeply about academia and who were not part of your institution,” Birgeneau said. “It can be very hard to keep your head above water.” Widely admired higher education leader, who previously served as Tufts president and MIT chancellor, to become next president in July Harvard names Lawrence S. Bacow as 29th president Praise, optimism in reaction to Bacow choice Bacow, named Harvard president, meets the presslast_img read more

Broadway Revival of Cats Begins Previews


first_img‘Cats'(Photo: Alessandro Pinna) Star Files Cats Related Shows View Commentscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 30, 2017 Jellicle cats come out tonight, Jellicle cats come one, come all! The Broadway revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats will begin preview performances at the Neil Simon Theatre on July 14. Directed by Trevor Nunn and choreographed by Hamilton’s Andy Blankenbuehler, based on the original choreography and associate direction by Gillian Lynne, Leona Lewis is set to take on the role of glamour cat Grizabella in the production. Opening night is scheduled for July 31.The cast will also include Broadway.com vlogger Tyler Hanes as Rum Tum Tugger, Ricky Ubeda as Mistoffelees, Quentin Earl Darrington as Old Deuteronomy, Eloise Kropp as Jennyannydots/Gumbie, Giuseppe Bausilio as Carbucketty, Jeremy Davis as Skimbleshanks, Kim Faure as Demeter, Sara Jean Ford as Jellylorum, Lili Froehlich as Electra, Daniel Gaymon as Macavity, Shonica Gooden as Rumpleteazer, Christopher Gurr as Gus/Bustopher Jones, Andy Huntington Jones as Munkustrap, Kolton Krouse as Tumblebrutus, Jess LeProtto as Mungojerrie, Georgina Pazcoguin as Victoria, Emily Pynenburg as Cassandra, Arianna Rosario as Sillabub, Ahmad Simmons as Alonzo, Christine Cornish Smith as Bombalurina, Corey Snide as Coricopat, Emily Tate as Tantomile and Sharrod Williams as Pouncival.Featuring a score by Lloyd Webber and lyrics by T.S. Eliot, Nunn and Richard Stilgoe, Cats follows a clowder of jellicles and each cat’s quest to be selected to ascend to the Heaviside Layer. The show, based on Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, ran for 21 years in London and 18 years on Broadway, where it won seven Tony Awards including Best Musical. This production will be the first Main Stem revival.Rounding out the company will be Richard Todd Adams, Aaron Albano, Callan Bergmann, Claire Camp, Francesca Granell, Jessica Hendy, Harris Milgrim, Madison Mitchell, Nathan Patrick Morgan and Megan Ort. Leona Lewislast_img read more

Board supports Foundation plan to amend the IOTA rule


first_imgBoard supports Foundation plan to amend the IOTA rule April 15, 2001 Managing Editor Regular News Board supports Foundation plan to amend the IOTA ruleMark D. Killian Managing Editor The Board of Governors has given its unanimous support to a Florida Bar Foundation plan to open the IOTA program to financial institutions other than banks and require those holding the trust accounts to pay interest rates or dividends commensurate with those offered to their non-IOTA depositors. Foundation President Ham Cooke told the Board of Governors March 30 in Melbourne that the proposed amendments to the IOTA rule which must be approved by the Supreme Court have the potential to double the money generated by the IOTA program. Cooke said low interest rates and high service charges over the past 10 years have reduced IOTA income from about $19 million per year to $11 million, forcing the Foundation to cut its legal aid to the poor grants by 32 percent over the past two years. “Our board has taken that very, very seriously,” Cooke said. “We wanted to do something to be as proactive as we could in trying to increase the return that IOTA is receiving.” To do that, Cooke said, the Foundation will soon petition the court to amend the IOTA rule to allow financial services companies such as Morgan Stanley Dean Witter or Merrill Lynch to hold IOTA accounts. The change also would require any institution that wants to handle IOTA accounts to place IOTA account funds in products paying the same market rate of interest or dividends available to non-IOTA depositors when IOTA accounts meet the same balance and other requirements. Authorized investments would include FDIC insured accounts, daily bank repurchase agreements (REPOs) or money market funds. Currently, IOTA funds can only be held in federally insured checking accounts or REPOs. The IOTA rule amendments being proposed by the Foundation make no change in the current requirement that all nominal or short-term client or third-person trust funds be invested for IOTA’s benefit. But, as always has been the case, attorneys and firms have a responsibility to make large or long-term trust deposits productive for clients whenever practical. Cooke said adopting the change could generate as much as $25 million annually for the Foundation and “allow us to then fund legal services at the level we did 10 years ago.” Bar President-elect Terry Russell urged the board to support the Foundation’s plan, which he said would “enable the Foundation to regain its footing” and provide more complete provision of resources to legal service organizations. Russell noted that since IOTA’s inception, the program has generated more than $156 million for legal aid, administration of justice, and law student assistance programs. In putting the plan together, Cooke said the Foundation worked to put the onus of meeting the new standards on the financial institutions and the Foundation, not the lawyers. Even by requiring that IOTA accounts earn the highest interest rate or dividend available to non-IOTA depositors with comparable balances at the same bank or financial services company, IOTA still is voluntary for institutions, Cooke said. But, by meeting the interest or dividend standard, banks would become eligible to hold IOTA accounts, and lawyers and firms would be required to deposit IOTA funds only in eligible institutions. As part of the plan, the Foundation also will independently work with banks and financial service companies to develop appropriate products which comply with the IOTA rule, Cooke said. That will include providing the banks with computer and technical support needed to remit IOTA earnings to the Foundation and conduct the required reporting. The Foundation, not the lawyer, will be responsible for monitoring usage of banks’ and financial services companies’ existing products available to non-IOTA depositors, with respect to rates being paid on individual attorney and law firm IOTA accounts as reported by the Foundation on IOTA remittance reports, in order to determine compliance with the IOTA rule. The proposal calls for no action to be required of law firms by the proposed amendments to monitor their institution’s compliance, and unless an attorney’s or law firm’s bank becomes ineligible to hold IOTA funds because of its unwillingness to place IOTA account funds in products in compliance with the rule. In that instance, the Foundation would advise the attorney or law firm that their financial institution had become ineligible to hold IOTA funds.last_img read more

USA: Dominion’s Cove Point ships first LNG export cargo


first_imgLNG World News Staff Dominion Energy’s Cove Point terminal in Maryland, the second US facility to produce LNG from shale gas, shipped its first cargo of the fuel on Friday.As previously reported by LNG World News, Shell’s 136,985-cbm LNG carrier Gemmata docked at the Cove Point facility on Wednesday to load the first LNG export cargo.The LNG tanker left the facility early on Friday, according to the marine data provider, VesselsValue. The vessel’s final destination was not disclosed by the time this article was published.Dominion Energy has previously said that Shell was providing the natural gas needed for liquefaction during the commissioning process of the facility and will off-take by ship the LNG that is produced.When commissioning is complete, Dominion’s LNG export facility will produce the chilled fuel for ST Cove Point, the joint venture of Japan’s Sumitomo Corporation and Tokyo Gas, and for India’s GAIL under 20-year contracts.The $4 billion Cove Point facility has a nameplate capacity of 5.25 mtpa of LNG.last_img read more