USA: Keystone Prepositioning Services Secures Contract for Operation, Maintenance of Three Ships


first_img View post tag: maintenance View post tag: services View post tag: secures View post tag: ships November 29, 2011 View post tag: Navy Industry news View post tag: contract USA: Keystone Prepositioning Services Secures Contract for Operation, Maintenance of Three Ships View post tag: Prepositioning View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Keystone View post tag: operation View post tag: three Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Keystone Prepositioning Services Secures Contract for Operation, Maintenance of Three Ships Keystone Prepositioning Services, Inc., Bala Cynwyd, Pa., is being awarded an $8,991,957 firm-fixed-price contract for the operation and maintenance of three of Military Sealift Command’s government-owned Maritime Prepositioning Force ships:  USNS Sgt. Matej Kocak, USNS Pfc. Eugene A. Obregon, and USNS Maj. Stephen W. Pless. The ships will continue to support at-sea prepositioning of equipment and supplies and surge-sealift requirements for the Department of Defense.  This contract includes options, which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $47,403,888.  The contract includes four one-year option periods and an annual award fee of up to $125,000 per ship.  The contractor can also earn up to $50,000 annually per ship for efforts that result in a reduction in ship energy consumption.Work will be performed at sea worldwide, and is expected to be completed in September 2012.  Completion date with all option periods exercised will be September 2016.   Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  This contract was competitively procured with more than 50 proposals solicited via solicitations posted to the Military Sealift Command, Navy Electronic Commerce Online and Federal Business Opportunities websites, with and six offers received.  The Military Sealift Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00033-12-C-3116).[mappress]Naval Today Staff , November 29, 2011; Image: navy View post tag: usa View post tag: Naval Share this articlelast_img read more

College welcomes junior parents


first_imgHarvard faculty, experts, and President Drew Faust welcomed the families of third-year undergraduates to campus and gave the Class of 2012 advice on preparing for life after college during the Junior Parents Weekend (JPW) program, March 4-5. More than 560 students and nearly 1,200 of their guests attended the annual event.Faust greeted an enthusiastic crowd in Sanders Theatre on Friday afternoon for the program’s official welcome. She recalled that the first time she addressed this group of parents and students in 2008, she urged the new freshmen to explore and move beyond their comfort zones. Now, she asked parents if their children had stretched their boundaries enough to have failed at something during their three years at Harvard.“If not, they haven’t been adventurous enough,” she said. “The good news is, there’s still time.”While she acknowledged students’ anxiety about the economy and the job search that lay ahead, Faust urged them “not to leave Harvard with your heads before you leave it with your bodies.” She said that the 14 months remaining in their college careers was a long time and encouraged parents to help keep their children focused on the present, even as they consider what to do next.President Drew Faust asked parents if their children had stretched their boundaries enough to have failed at something during their three years at Harvard. “If not, they haven’t been adventurous enough,” she said. “The good news is, there’s still time.”Faust’s advice was echoed by a panel of college seniors who followed her address and shared wisdom gained during their time at Harvard. All said that experiences outside the classroom had been influential in shaping their college experience and their plans for the future. Senior Romeo Alexander shared a path that took him from Africa to New York.“I went to Ghana to study the history of slavery after my freshman year,” he said. “I visited the slave castles and learned about my own history and the history of the world. After my sophomore year, I did the Princeton in Ishikawa Program in Japan, in a home where no one spoke any English at all. Last summer I was in Tokyo with Deutsche Bank. Next year I’m going to New York. I’ve got a job helping to sell Japanese stocks.”Earlier in the day, parents piled into Science Center and listened as Harvard’s Office of Career Services (OCS) staff listed ways that third-year students could prepare for graduate school, work, and other opportunities: Take the GMAT and GRE now, while you’re in school mode; study hard, because graduate and professional programs look for a strong GPA; apply for fellowships early in the fall of senior year.Then, OCS’s undergraduate advising guru Nancy Saunders uttered three words that were music to the ears of tuition-payers. “Senior job search,” she said, savoring each syllable. “How good does that sound?”Saunders said that the process of finding a job often begins with an internship during the summer after junior year. She recommended that parents and students visit the OCS website to find out about opportunities. Saunders plugged the Crimson Careers portal, on which OCS has posted 9,679 internships and 4,000 full-time jobs since July 2010. She also urged juniors to look to the fall of their senior year and book one-on-one appointments with OCS career counselors, who see seniors almost exclusively during the first month of the semester.“Not everyone knows that they want to be a banker,” she said. “Seniors are welcome to come in and meet with a counselor, to take the Myers-Briggs personality test, to have a conversation, and to brainstorm.”OCS Director Robin Mount acknowledged the desire of parents to see their children enter the world of work, but said that Harvard undergraduates have broad interests and many different skills, which can make the decision to commit to a career path challenging. She told parents not to be concerned if their child wants to take some time off before applying to graduate school “since 75 percent of Harvard College graduates will eventually get a graduate degree.”On Saturday, parents and students considering a career in business heard from Rakesh Khurana, the Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at Harvard Business School, on the history and future of business education.Khurana noted that business education has expanded dramatically in the past 60 years. This year, for instance, U.S. business schools will award more than 120,000 master’s degrees in business administration, up from only 3,000 M.B.A.s in 1950. At the same time, business schools — originally brought to the university in the early 20th century to professionalize the occupation, standardize the knowledge of practitioners, and tie the action of firms and corporations to the common good — have increasingly become places for students to acquire a credential and to build networks that will further their careers.Khurana said that, to reconnect business education with its founding values, institutions should have an honest conversation about what students need to know and then raise the standards of the curriculum. Moreover, business education should be lifelong. Managers should come back to school frequently to refresh their knowledge.Later on Saturday, parents and undergraduates addressed the common good more directly at the public interest careers discussion, hosted by the Phillips Brooks House Association. Travis Lovett, interim director of the Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC), led the informal session. He said that Harvard undergraduates can receive funding for public service in two ways: They can come to CPIC with an idea for a public service project and apply for direct funding, or they can use CPIC as a liaison to one of the more than 600 nonprofits that have a relationship with the center.“Our postgraduate fellowship program works with nonprofits in six major cities including Boston, New York, and Chicago,” he said. “Students can see a catalog of job listings on our website. If they’re interested in one, they can apply through us. We interview them and give them feedback. Based on the interview, if we feel they’re a good fit for a particular organization, then we recommend them for the position.”While no one in the audience expected to get rich through public interest work, many were glad to hear that each organization that lists a job with CPIC must pay a living wage and offer benefits.“Most of our positions are between $30,000 and $45,000,” he said. “Commitments are typically one to two years, because many of our fellows go on to graduate school. Some are offered a continuing position, though, and stay on.”Response from parents and students to the weekend’s events was positive. Detroit’s Jeannie Wonders, parent of junior Grant Wonders, said that she appreciated the workshops and information she got during JPW. At the end of the day, though, she said that the best part of being in Cambridge was seeing her son and his friends.“It’s nice to come and see Grant in this environment,” she said. “I got to chat with his roommates. The energy of the youth on campus is invigorating. He can come home and tell us about what it’s like to be at Harvard, but it’s not the same as being here.”last_img read more

Comments on mortgage servicing, literacy plan due in May


first_imgComments on changes to mortgage servicing rules, as well as a draft national financial literacy strategy, are due in May.In 2011, the Financial Literacy and Education Commission released a national strategy titled “Promoting Financial Success in the United States: National Strategy for Financial Literacy.”The commission plans to update the strategy to reflect changes within the last five years, and the Treasury seeks comments on a draft update. This update will be created by adding new text and edits to the original 2011 National StrategyComments are due May 11.The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is seeking comments on amendments to its 2013 mortgage servicing rules. These fall under Regulation Z, which implements the Truth in Lending Act, and Regulation X, which implements the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. continue reading » 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Top Cop Credits Public, Officers for Uniondale Murder Suspect’s Arrest


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police arrested an alleged murder suspect in Uniondale just minutes after he fled the scene of the slaying Monday, police said.Acting on a ShotSpotter notification alerting them to the scene and 911 calls from witnesses, two officers spotted the vehicle fleeing south on Uniondale Avenue and apprehended 35-year-old Joel Arquimides Ayala Deras of Westbury, police said. He was charged with second-degree murder.The two First Precinct officers—Christopher DiGregorio and Gary Butt—also discovered shotgun casings and a .44-caliber handgun on the floor of the car. A subsequent search turned up a shotgun that police believe was used in the slaying, along with a .380-caliber handgun. The victim, 37-year-old German Ismael Saravia Melendez, was fatally shot in the head and back, acting-Nassau County Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter said at a press conference at police headquarters in Mineola Wednesday. Melendez was pronounced dead by an ambulance technician 20 minutes after the shooting.Krumpter credited the two officers for their “keen” observations while racing toward the scene of the shooting.“ShotSpotter is a great tool but without the great police work by the officers involved, the keen observation, road conditions were pretty horrific…they were able to respond in a timely fashion,” said Krumpter, who was flanked by police brass and officers Butt and DiGregorio.Investigators have yet to determine a motive for the shooting, Krumpter said. But officials did say that the two men were acquaintances and had an ongoing dispute. Neither have gang ties.The shooting occurred at 9:44 p.m. Monday, police said. Authorities were alerted to the vicinity near Macon Place and Irving Place by the ShotSpotter alert, which is activated when gunshots are registered in communities where the technology is installed. Calls to 911 and the ShotSpotter alerts came in almost simultaneously, police said.Witnesses provided police with a description of the car, and the two officers were able to act on that information almost immediately.“ShotSpotter didn’t jump off the telephone pole and arrest the defendants,” Krumpter told reporters. “In this case it was the police officers who were responding to the scene; the adrenaline’s pumping, and they’re responding to a shots fired and they were paying attention to what was going on around them on Uniondale Avenue where they observed the vehicle fleeing the scene.”Krumpter defended the department’s perceived failure to adequately alert the public to a homicide, saying the primary responsibility of the department is to conduct probes without compromising investigations.Police did not release details of the fatal shooting until late Tuesday.This is the first homicide in Nassau in 2016. The first fatal shooting in Suffolk was Jan. 17 in North Bay Shore, police said. In that case, 44-year-old Marcelo Argueta Chicas’ lifeless body was discovered with a gunshot wound. The shooting, which also registered on ShotSpotter, remains unsolved.Deras will be arraigned Wednesday at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

Eagles lose second QB in two weeks to injury — who is left?


first_imgIf in a pinch, Pederson could put wide receivers Braxton Miller or Greg Ward, both college quarterbacks, under center.Ward starred for Houston from 2013-16 and threw 52 career touchdowns for the Cougars, while Miller was electric in three seasons as the starting quarterback at Ohio State aa he was named Big Ten MVP and Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year twice.However, if Pederson had his way, Kessler will clear concussion protocol in the coming days and return Philly’s quarterback situation to some semblance of order. Antonio Brown denies reports claiming he’d retire without old helmet Clayton Thorson places the pass where it needs to be and Greg Ward handles the rest for a 38-yard score. #PHIvsJAX | #FlyEaglesFly pic.twitter.com/XQfhDgy4xd— Philadelphia Eagles (@Eagles) August 15, 2019Pederson said after the game the team will evaluate Kessler going forward, but as it stands, he has to be nervous about the quarterback column of his depth chart considering he has just one healthy arm behind Carson Wentz, who has his own unfortunate injury history.It’s unclear if the Eagles will address the dwindling depth at the position or if they’ll let Thorson handle the vast majority of snaps the remainder of the preseason as they preserve Wentz. Odell Beckham Jr. injury update: Browns wideout (hip) say’s he’ll be ready Week 1 Philip Rivers: Tom Brady, other elite QBs can’t be judged solely by Super Bowl wins By the end of the Eagles’ preseason game against the Jaguars on Thursday, it’s safe to say Philadelphia head coach Doug Peterson was looking longingly across the field at Nick Foles standing on the opposite sideline.Philly’s backup quarterback situation is in shambles after Cody Kessler suffered a concussion less than three minutes into Thursday’s contest. Last week, Nate Sudfeld broke his wrist against the Titans. 👀 Here is the nasty hit that knocked Eagles quarterback Cody Kessler out of the game @6abc #CodyKessler #Eagles pic.twitter.com/dB20sEg9Us— Jeff Skversky 6abc (@JeffSkversky) August 15, 2019Kessler’s misfortune left Clayton Thorson, the 2019 fifth-round pick from Northwestern, to finish the game. He finished a respectable 16-of-26 passing for 175 yards, one touchdown and an interception in a 24-10 win.“It was fun out there. I played a lot and I got into a rhythm and stayed that way,” Thorson said (via the team’s official website). “The receivers did a great job. It just all came together. It was a great experience out there for me.” Related Newslast_img read more