As The Crow Flies Continues Inaugural Tour In Las Vegas [Photo]


first_imgOn Tuesday evening, As The Crow Flies rolled through Las Vegas, making a stop at the Brooklyn Bowl for a highly anticipated performance. As The Crow Flies is a relatively new project from Chris Robinson, formerly of The Black Crowes, which is in the midsts of its inaugural tour that kicked off at The Capitol Theatre on April 17th. The band also features Crowes guitarist Audley Freed and bassist Andy Hess, Chris Robinson Brotherhood drummer Tony Leone and keyboardist Adam MacDougall, as well as young famed guitarist Marcus King.Seemingly, it seems as though As The Crow Flies has been offering up fairly standardized setlists with some deviation across towns. For the band’s Las Vegas set, the group opened with a number of classic Black Crowes tunes, with the opening numbers of “Remedy” and “Sting Me” off the group’s sophomore album, 1992’s The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion, followed up by “Twice As Hard”, off The Black Crowes’ 1990 debut, Shake Your Money Maker.While the band pulled from across The Black Crowes’ expansive catalog, As The Crow Flies also found ample opportunity to lay out a few choice covers. Halfway through the performance, the group offered up a standout cover of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s “Almost Cut My Hair”, which followed a take on “Wiser Time”, off The Black Crowes’ 1994 Amorica. The band also closed out their set with a pairing of Otis Redding’s “Hard To Handle” and Joe South’s “Hush”, ahead of their one-song encore offering of Johnny Winter’s “Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo”.You can check out photos from As The Crow Flies’ Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas show on May 8th below, courtesy of Paul Citone.Setlist: As The Crow Flies | Brooklyn Bowl | Las Vegas, NV | 5/8/2018Set: Remedy, Sting Me, Twice as Hard, Nonfiction, By Your Side, Sometimes Salvation, High Head Blues, Good Friday, Almost Cut My Hair (Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young cover), Wiser Time, She Talks to Angels, Thorn in My Pride, Jealous Again, Hard to Handle (Otis Redding cover), Hush (Joe South cover)Encore: Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo (Johnny Winter cover)Photo: As The Crow Flies | Brooklyn Bowl | Las Vegas, NV | 5/8/2018 | Credit: Paul Citone Photo: Paul Citone Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Pope condemns Dhaka ‘slave labour’


first_imgPope Francis spoke out against “only looking to make a profit”Pope Francis has denounced as “slave labour” the conditions of workers caught in a deadly building collapse in Bangladesh last week.More than 400 people are confirmed to have died in the collapse of the Rana Plaza building near the capital, Dhaka.It housed several clothing factories, some supplying Western retailers.At May Day parades in Dhaka, marchers demanded the death penalty for the building’s owner and better conditions for workers.The Pope said he had been shocked by reports that some of the labourers had been paid just 38 euros ($50) a month.“Today in the world this slavery is being committed against something beautiful that God has given us – the capacity to create, to work, to have dignity,” the Pope said at a private Mass. “Not paying a fair wage, not giving a job because you are only looking at balance sheets, only looking to make a profit, that goes against God,” he was quoted as saying by Vatican radio.‘Better safety’At least 410 people are confirmed to have died and more than 140 are missing following the collapse of the eight-storey building a week ago, police and army officials said. Some 2,500 people were injured.It was the country’s worst industrial disaster.More than 30 of those killed, whose bodies have not been identified, were buried in a mass funeral on Wednesday.In Dhaka, an estimated 20,000 people took part in the main May Day march, while separate demonstrations were held in other parts of the capital and elsewhere. “I want the death penalty for the owner of the building,” said one marcher, 18-year-old garment factory worker Mongidul Islam Rana. “We want regular salaries, raises and absolutely we want better safety in our factories.”Others in Dhaka held banners with the words: “Hang the killers, Hang the factory owners.”Speaking at a rally in the industrial township of Narayanganj, the leader of Bangladesh’s main opposition party, Khaleda Zia, alleged that the government was hiding the real casualty figures from the building collapse. She also claimed that if the army had been given control of the rescue operation earlier, more lives could have been saved.The European Union has said it is considering “appropriate action” to encourage improvements in working conditions in Bangladeshi factories.It said its actions might include the use of its trade preference system, which gives Bangladesh duty- and quota-free access to EU markets.Bangladesh’s garment industry makes up almost 80% of the country’s annual exports and provides employment to about four million people.However, it has faced criticism over low pay and limited rights given to workers, and for the often dangerous working conditions in factories.Both Primark, which has a large presence in the UK, and Canadian company Loblaw had clothing made in the Rana Plaza, and have said they will offer aid to victims and their families.Rana Plaza owner Mohammed Sohel Rana, a local leader of the youth wing of the ruling Awami League party, is in police custody.A total of eight people, including factory owners and engineers, have been arrested for alleged negligence.BBC News Tweet Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img FaithInternationalLifestylePrint Pope condemns Dhaka ‘slave labour’ by: – May 1, 2013 Share 68 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

The A’s will stop paying minor league players; will they become free agents? Nope.


first_imgAccording to Baseball America, as of Friday morning, 15 teams have committed to paying their minor-leaguers the standard stipend of $400 per week — on average, that was a raise for Single-A and Double-A players, and a reduction for Triple-A players — at least through the end of June. Some teams, like the Mariners, Padres and Marlins, have already committed to paying their minor-leaguers through the scheduled end of the season. MORE: David Price pledges $1,000 to Dodgers minor-leaguersIt’s not yet known what the other 14 teams will do, but to this point, the A’s are the only team that has decided not to pay its minor league players. How much is that saving the A’s? Just some rough math. Say there are 200 players in a minor league system. Paying each $400/week for July, July and August is $5,200 per player. To pay every minor leaguer would have cost the Oakland A’s a hair over $1 million.Owner John Fisher is worth an estimated $2 billion.— Jeff Passan (@JeffPassan) May 27, 2020The A’s, as noted by Passan, are owned by John Fisher, who has a reported net worth of $2.1 billion, according to Forbes. He’s the youngest son of Gap founders Doris and Donald Fisher. So when we say it’s a choice, it’s just that. John Fisher’s hand is not being forced. He’s not facing insolvency if he pays his club’s minor-leaguers what they’re owed, or what other teams are paying their minor-league players. He’s just choosing not to pay his minor-leaguers — and others in the organization — anything to save a few bucks while baseball is stopped. Seems like a poor human choice, but it’s not my money and he didn’t ask me how to spend it. The A’s aren’t the only team cutting minor league costs, it also should be noted. This week was a disaster for minor league players, as hundreds of players across the sport were released on Wednesday and Thursday. But here’s a question that immediately came to mind with Oakland’s news: If the A’s are no longer paying their minor-leaguers, shouldn’t those minor-leaguers now be free agents? Logically, that makes sense, and it would be the case for pretty much any other person impacted by the coronavirus. And that’s the case for far too many Americans, as the U.S. unemployment rate hit 14.7 percent in April and is almost certainly higher now. MORE: A’s soil ‘lovable underdog’ image by not paying minor-leaguersI already knew the answer to that question, and I’m sure you do, too. Here’s an email from A’s general manager David Forst to the club’s minor-leaguers. Here is the email David Forst sent to players today: https://t.co/rwHqiAeKla pic.twitter.com/rEZK2RC1eZ— Robert Murray (@ByRobertMurray) May 27, 2020Basically: “We’re not going to pay you, but you’re still prohibited by the terms of your contract from seeking employment elsewhere.”I asked Garrett Broshuis, a former minor league pitcher who is now an attorney with a long history of advocating for the rights of minor-leaguers, for his thoughts on the subject. “No other industry in America operates like this,” Broshuis said. “It’s such an unreasonable expectation, to think that even though I’m not paying you anymore, you can’t go and take your skills that you’ve worked so hard to develop and earn a living somewhere else. It highlights the complete ridiculousness of this contract, which is a contract out of the 1920s still, with the fact that they own your rights for so long, and there’s very little the player can do about it.”The A’s are using Paragraph 23 of the Uniform Player Contract, a section that addresses suspension of a contract. Here’s the standard contract; scroll down to XXIII.So do the A’s minor-leaguers have any real legal recourse?“It would take a Curt Flood-like player to actually challenge it,” Broshuis said. “It would be a variabled action, most likely would take an actual legal action in court, because it’s difficult to see how the commissioner’s office would come out with an alternative interpretation. It would take a very brave player to challenge something like this.”First of all, only a handful of players would even make sense. It would have to be someone who doesn’t figure to be in the mix at the big-league level this year, even with the expanded rosters. But, it also would have to be a minor-leaguer good enough that the A’s wouldn’t want to just cut him to end the hassle (allowing him to be a free agent). And it would have to be someone not concerned how his legal actions would impact how other baseball teams see him. MORE: Explaining the controversial pay cuts owners want players to accept But here’s the biggest thing: It’s probably not worth the effort because the timeline just doesn’t make sense. It seems likely that minor league baseball will resume in 2021, which means we’re really only talking about three months of pay the A’s minor-leaguers are missing (the minor league regular seasons finish at the end of August). The legal process would certainly take much, much longer. Flood’s case started in 1969 — he refused report after an October trade sent him from the Cardinals to Phillies — and wasn’t resolved until the United States Supreme Court ruled in MLB’s favor in June 1972.  So, basically, the A’s ballplayers have no real recourse.  Even though the club isn’t going to pay them, they can’t become free agents and there’s really nothing they can do about it. The MLBPA isn’t primarily concerned with players until they reach the majors, and the MLBPA has other pressing matters to deal with at the moment. Minor league players don’t have their own union, though Broshuis is part of Advocates for Minor Leaguers, a new organization founded to help represent minor league players. Broshuis has long been leading the charge to raise salaries for minor league players, and this is an extension of those efforts. “It just goes to show the root of the issue, which is the lack of representation. Minor-leaguers have never had a union, they’ve never had somebody looking out for their interest” Broshuis said. “This contract has changed very little in the last 100 years. That is the void we’re stepping into. This situation highlights why an organization like ours is so desperately needed, and why we need to grow this organization, and why we need to be out there advocating on behalf of these players. They need it more than ever.” The Oakland A’s have decided not to pay their minor league players for the rest of the season. That’s their choice, first reported by the San Francisco Chronicle on Tuesday.The A’s, along with every other MLB team, initially committed to paying their minor-leaguers $400 per week through the end of May as the sport deals with the impact of the shutdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic. last_img read more

Swimming to Fight Cancer


first_imgSwimmers stay in their lanes in the Chapel Beach Club pool during the swim marathon to benefit the American Cancer Society. Monday, July 23rd 2012Back row, from left, Gerri Kellett, Lisa Halikias, who is a cancer survivor, Marianne Vel Camp and event co-coordinator Emily VelCamp; front row, from left, American Cancer Society Director of Special Events Jen Hernandez, event co-coodinator Adele Kellett, Andrea LeLand, MiaRose LeLand, Chapel Beach Club owner Sandy Mulheren and swim teach coach Kyle DeLisa.Chapel Swim Team members from Chapel Beach Club in Sea Bright held a morning swim marathon on Monday, July 23, to raise funds for the American Cancer Society. Swimmers, ages 6 to 16, took part in the event that raised funds through pledges each lap the participants completed. Dozens of youngsters participated in a swim marathon to benefit the American Cancer Society.last_img read more

The Hills are alive with the sound of garlic


first_imgBy Timothy Schafer, The Nelson DailyYou don’t have to travel 1,900 kilometres and cross the Garlic Wall in eastern Saskatchewan to get your fill of garlic this weekend.In less than 90 minutes of slope-style driving up the Slocan Valley you can be in New Denver, amidst thousands of garlic lovers and admirers, reveling in the heady aroma of the herb at the 18th annual Hills Garlic Festival on Sunday (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) in Centennial Park. Although it has grown too large for the tiny community of Hills north of New Denver to host, the festival has stayed true to its roots — and its name — with an array of homemade and homegrown organic products, many made from garlic, from 160 vendors across the West Kootenay and beyond.With organic garlic (of course), garlic wreaths and other garlic snacks, the festival also features fresh organic produce, plants and plant products, local crafts — art, jewelry, wood, flutes, furniture, pottery, textiles, rocks — soaps, lotions, herbal remedies and an assortment of food vendors and live entertainment.Last year over 6,000 people poured into New Denver to pay homage to the herbage at the festival, watching as awards for largest head of garlic (soft-neck and stiff-neck), heaviest clove, best garlic poem and best garlic braid were handed out.Admission is $4 for adults with children under 12 allowed in for free. The event is a fundraiser for the Hills Recreation Society and has helped fund recreational facilities and services such as basketball, tennis courts and cross country ski trails.A reminder to festival goers: there is no cash machine on site and most vendors cannot accept credit [email protected]last_img read more

Mallard’s Team of the Week – L.V. Rogers Senior Boy’s Rugby


first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers came ever so close to winning back-to-back BC High School Tier I Rugby Championship.The Bombers dropped a heartbreaking 17-13 decision to Glenlyon Norfolk of Victoria in the Division Final Saturday in Abbotsford. The Bombers advanced to the final by stopping Seycove 22-17 in the semi-final.The Bombers, representing the Kootenay zone, opened the tournament with a 24-5 shellacking of DW Poppy of Langley.Michael Caldecott was named winner of the Commissioner’s XV award as top player on the Bombers.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the Silver Medal showing of LVR with Team of the Week honours.The Bombers include, Dyllen Dixon, Relmu Sanchez, Sebastien Bohdine, Ezra Harding, Michael Caldecott, Seamus Howard, Liam Smith, T.J. Winters, Raven Johnson, Rowan Megale, Eli Lusted, Joel Bokenfohr, Owen Pfeffer, Cian Sanchez, Evan Klenk and coach Michael Joyce.last_img read more

Netflix says that its new deal for original progra


first_imgNetflix says that its new deal for original programming from DreamWorks is its largest yet and will cover 300 hours of new programming.The streaming service and animation studio already had a programming deal in place with Dreamworks for Turbo: F.A.S.T., a TV spin-off from upcoming DreamWorks animated movie Turbo.The new deal will see the partners make TV series based on new and classic DreamWorks characters and movie titles. The first fruits of the partnership will be delivered next year, the companies said, without specifying what the first shows might be.DreamWorks movie titles include Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda and How to Train Your Dragon franchises and it has also acquired Classic Media, which owns Mr Magoo, Casper the Friendly Ghost and several other classic titles.DreamWorks is moving heavily into TV and on Netflix, its characters will be introduced as a branded collection of shows.“This is an unprecedented commitment to original content in the internet television space,” said DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg.Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos said: “This deal represents a major expansion of what’s already a phenomenal relationship, allowing us to bring beloved DreamWorks characters to the 40 countries where Netflix operates and setting the stage for us to innovate together as we expand into new markets.”last_img read more

Swedish cable operator Com Hems board has agreed


first_imgSwedish cable operator Com Hem’s board has agreed to launch a share buyback programme totaling SEK1.5 billion (€160 million) over the next year.The buyback will enable Com Hem to distribute funds to shareholders. Together with an ordinary dividend of SEK1 per share, the programme means that Com Hem has allocated SEK1.7 billion to be repaid to its shareholders.Com Hem’s share capital will be reduced by cancelling the shares that has been repurchased.last_img