New national commitment to sustainable food and drink


first_imgResource efficiency charity WRAP has pledged to reduce the resource intensity of the UK’s food and drink by one-fifth, saving £20bn.On behalf of the government and devolved administrations, it has unveiled “a pioneering commitment”, which brings together organisations from across the food industry to make food and drink production and consumption more sustainable for the future.As well as a £20bn saving to the economy, WRAP wants leading organisations from across the food chain to work together to tackle food and drink waste, greenhouse gas emissions and water intensity. Ninety-nine signatories, including all the major UK food retailers, as well as brands, foodservice companies, trade bodies and local authorities, have already signed up.Supermarket signatories include Asda, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Morrisons, Waitrose, Marks & Spencer, The Co-operative Food, Aldi UK, Lidl and the Central England Co-operative.Other notable signatories include Associated British Foods, Birds Eye UK, Premier Foods, Warburtons, the British Retail Consortium, the British Sandwich & Food to Go Association, the Food and Drink Federation and the Food Standards Agency.The Courtauld Commitment 2025, as it is called, is a voluntary agreement “to work along the entire food chain to reduce the environmental impact of our food and drink, from farm to fork and beyond”. Signatories announced at its launch represent over 93% of the 2016 UK food and drink market share. The commitment has three targets:A 20% reduction in food and drink waste arising in the UKA 20% reduction in greenhouse gas intensity of food and drink consumed in the UKA reduction in the impact associated with water use in the supply chain.Signatories will work together with WRAP to identify new actions and opportunities to save resources, which can be shared across the entire supply chain to make the whole system more sustainable and resilient to disruptions. Signatories also commit to implementing changes, measuring the benefits, and helping other businesses and people to realise savings.Safeguard UK foodDr Richard Swannell, director of sustainable food systems at WRAP, said: “To safeguard UK food we need a step-change to increase sustainable food and drink production and consumption, conserve resources and combat climate change. Courtauld 2025 will do this.“Collaboration has never been more important… I look forward to welcoming other leading organisations as signatories over the coming weeks, months and years, and delivering this ambitious agreement.”Resources Minister Rory Stewart said: “Food waste – at any stage from the farm to the house – is something we should avoid. It wastes precious water and resources.  “Under the last framework we have already reduced food waste in the supply chain by 10%. And this team-work and leadership should allow us to go much further.”last_img read more

Strategizing the Way Forward to National Development


first_imgI will begin this article with an excerpt from Rev. Martin Luther King’s “Letter From Birmingham Hail” written on April 16, 1963: “We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and action of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people. Human progress never rolls on wheels of inevitability; it comes through the tireless effort of men willing to be co-workers with God, and without this hard work, time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation.”As a child growing up in Monrovia, absolutely nothing would have convinced me then that Liberia, a nation with abundance of resources, would today be in a state of underdevelopment and backwardness. Notably, there are two fundamental reasons which account for this pathetic state. The first is the lackadaisical attitude adopted by our policy makers and planners towards implementing policies to positively impact the lives of ordinary Liberians; and the second is the attitude of passivity of ordinary Liberians in advocating for those basic rights and privileges denied them over the years.Irrefutably, achieving national development requires commitment and dedication on the part of both the policy makers and planners, and ordinary Liberians. Obviously, the way forward to national development must be based upon Liberians from diverse backgrounds coming together and reconciling their divergent views and actions.The blunt reality is that words are easily said than done. To embark on a new course, it is imperative we retrospect on Liberia’s past to discover where precisely our missteps occurred during our national existence. The question that naturally springs forth is, were the founding fathers of Liberia prepared to effectively and efficiently manage the nation? The answer is resounding, “No”.Clearly, the administration of Joseph J. Roberts which led Liberia after the nation hastily declared independence on July 26, 1847 felt short of establishing a solid political foundation. Consequently, this created a unique avenue for corruption, nepotism and other vices which are still prevalent in the governance of the nation even up to today.For the benefit of the reader, permit me to reveal an excerpt of a report of conditions in Liberia written by William Nesbit, a black American, who visited Liberia in 1854 during the era of Liberia’s first president Joseph Jenkins Roberts:“And it is humiliating to me to say it, though it must be said, that the majority of them, even including some of his cabinet officers, cannot read and are totally ignorant of the simplest duties belonging to their stations. Every thing is and must be done by the President. He performs the duties of judge, counselor, justice and constable. He receives, disburses, and keeps the accounts, in short, he is the government, the embodiment of Liberia; and when you speak of Liberia, you speak of President Roberts.”The problems in Liberia are aged old, formidable and seem to be defying solution. The case of forging development in Liberia is proving to be a stubborn one owing to the fact that many Liberians have become accustomed to behavior patterns which are counterproductive and anti-developmental. As Martin Luther King rightly stated in his ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail’, “human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability.”In other words, development will never be delivered on “Silver Platter”, it will come when Liberians from all walks of life are willing and ready to constructively engage in sacrificial services that put the interests of the nation and its people above the selfish concept of “I, me and myself”. Without the shadow of doubts, most government officials are involved in systematic corruption which had heightened the levels of poverty and misery amongst ordinary Liberians.I definitely do not wish to discredit the Ellen Johnson Sirleaf-led administration, which had made some gains in the areas of health, educations, road construction, etc. but these gains have so little impacted the living standards of ordinary Liberians.No wonder why almost every Liberian, you talk to will not hesitate to express the desires of seeking greener pastures in the U.S.A. or some advanced countries.Many Liberians have simply lost hope and confidence in what the future of their country holds for them.The way forward to national development is certainly not for ordinary Liberians to sit as spectators and leave their destinies in the hands of gluttonous government officials, but rather to play more pivotal roles in shaping or reshaping their destiny. Now is the appropriate time that all Liberians must work tirelessly to ensure that 167-year-old Liberia takes it rightful place amongst the comity of nations.Let me close with these wise words from Martin Luther King’s ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail’: “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”About the AuthorJahbulleh C. Dempster is former Co-Chairman for Operations of Saye Town. He is currently the Interim Secretary General of the Union of Liberian Artists. His letters as well as articles, which are usually published in the Daily Observer reflect his ardent desire for socio-economic reforms in the Liberian Society.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

EMOTIONAL RETURN BY LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF FAMOUS DONEGAL TEAM


first_imgLeo is surrounded by family and good friends at St Catherine’s clubhouse during his emotional return.There were tears shed and stories told when the last surviving member of the Killybegs soccer team which played in the FAI Junior Cup final against Drumcondra in 1939 made an emotional visit to the St Catherine’s Football Club clubhouse.The visit, on the eve of Leo McGinley’s 98th birthday, was organised by his nephew, Sean Mc Ginley, while holidaying in his native Kilcar.Accompanied by his son, John and daughter, Antoinette, he was greeted by officers and members of the club and by the sons, daughters and grand-children of his former club-mates from those far off days. Leo with his family.Leo has lived most of his life in Ballysheedy, Co Limerick, where he ran his own business.Leo, played right-half forward for Killybegs Emeralds, as the team was then known, But he recalled: “That was my position but I could shift over to the left, either, because I had two good feet.”He added: “I remember the last game I played, I was coming off the field when two fellows came down beside me and asked me was I Leo McGinley. I said I was and they asked me would I be interested in going over to England for a trial with Southend United.”He smiled as he remembered what he replied to their offer: “I told them that I wasn’t a soccer player at all; I was a Gaelic player.” The offer came to nothing, anyway, as World War II broke out shortly afterwards. “Then it was all over the papers that if any Irish fellow wanted, he could go over to England to work and that he wouldn’t be called up. Myself and a mate of mine, John Byrne, went to England and worked all through the war.”During his time there, Leo worked as a machine operator in Scotland, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Farnborough, Reading. Nottingham and Derby County. “I was there nine years”, he said, “and I came home every year except one year there was no boat when the War was on.”But it was Limerick he came back to after his time in Britain. “They had a GAA Club in Nottingham when I was there and I used to play. I was on the pitch one day when two big fellows came up to me and asked me would I like to go back to Ireland, driving a machine for them. I said I would. They were the Sheehy brothers and they had a business in Limerick.”However, Leo only stayed 18 months with them. “I found out that what I could do for them I could do for myself, so I bought a machine of my own and set up my own business.”It was while staying in digs in Limerick at that time that Leo met Mary Consodine. The couple married and had eight children. Mary died eight years ago. The children are Bernadette, now living in Brighton; Mary, in Cork; Eamonn and Colette, both living in Dublin, Geraldine, Claire, John and Antoinette, all in Limerick. Leo was greeted by several people who were related to the team mates he played with 76 years ago, including three sisters of the late Peadar Molloy, Moira Mallon, Esther and Mary Goretti, whose father, Willie Joe Molloy, purchased the field which is still the home ground of the club, Eithne White, whose father, Joe Cunningham was chairman of the club when Leo McGinley played and whose grand-son, Daniel Breslin, is currently first team manager.Other well-wishers included Joey Murrin, whose father played with Leo, and who himself was a player and referee, Brian McGilloway and Aideen Morrow, whose father, John McGilloway, played on the 1939 team, and several Dorrians, whose family have been stalwarts of the club since its foundation.St Catherine’s FC club chairman, Martin Murrin, presented Leo with a club jersey, scarf and hat, as a memento of his visit, along with a copy of the book, “St Catherine’s FC – A Celebration of 100 Years of Soccer in Killybegs”, which was published by the club in 1996. He was also presented with a number of framed photographs of the famous 1939 team.EMOTIONAL RETURN BY LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF FAMOUS DONEGAL TEAM was last modified: August 10th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:KillybegsLeo McGinleySt Catherineslast_img read more