Northern Health, Ministry of Environment issue dust advisory for Peace Region


first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Northern Health, along with the Ministry of Environment, has issued a dust advisory for Fort St. John because of high concentrations of dust and coarse particulate matter, which refers to airborne solid or liquid droplets that are between 2.5 and 10 micrometres in diametre.A press release states that these concentrations are expected to carry on until there is precipitation, or the streets are cleared of traction material.The warning also extends to the South Peace River region, and air quality advisories pertaining to dust have also been announced for Burns Lake, Smithers, Vernon and Golden.- Advertisement -Levels tend to be highest around busy roads and industrial operations. This advisory is in effect until further notice, and people with chronic underlying medical conditions are urged to postpone strenuous exercise near busy streets until the advisory is lifted.People are also encouraged to reduce personal health risk who the advisory is in effect by avoiding roads with heavy traffic, avoiding doing excessive outdoor physical activity, and taking shelter in air-conditioned buildings with large indoor volumes so there is limited entry for outdoor air.The Ministry of Environment says exposure to dust is particularly concerning for infants, the elderly, and those who have diabetes, lung disease or heart disease.Advertisement More updates and real-time air quality observations can be found online.last_img read more

Explore spring wildflowers on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge


first_imgDog Mountain is so bloomin’ popular with hardy hikers, the U.S. Forest Service has again instituted a spring-weekend permit system to prevent the place from getting loved to death. Permits are required Saturdays and Sundays, April 20 through June 16, and they cost $1 each. That’s down 50 cents from last year. Parking costs $5 per vehicle every day, not just weekends.Why so popular? Just over an hour from downtown Vancouver, Dog Mountain offers some of the Columbia River Gorge’s most scenic joys, featuring dizzying vistas and dazzling wildflower meadows of yellow, white, deep purple and flaming red. Visitors used to overwhelm the parking area on spring weekends, forcing some to park and walk on narrow state Highway 14, endangering themselves and motorists.That’s why the Forest Service launched its permit reservation system in 2018. It’s back again this year, providing greater sanity at the trailhead and greater access for hikers who’ve always liked Dog Mountain but never competing with crowds. “Last year’s program was highly successful,” said Lynn Burditt, area manager for Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. “Many people said they hiked Dog Mountain for the first time last year, because they didn’t have to wake up early to beat crowds into the parking lot.”Visit Recreation.gov to reserve up to four permits. With 250 permits available per day, planning ahead is crucial. Northwest Forest Passes and other interagency passes are accepted as payment, but a Dog Mountain pass is still mandatory. Washington State Park passes don’t get you into this federal site.A hiking permit does not guarantee parking at the trailhead, which costs an additional $5. Consider parking at the Skamania County Fairgrounds in Stevenson and taking the $2 round-trip shuttle to the trailhead; riders will get a free hiking permit, too. The shuttle runs every half-hour from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends, through the season.last_img read more