VITL partners with Medicity to improve health care delivery in Vermont


first_imgVermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL), operator of Vermont’s statewide health information exchange (HIE), announced today that it has selected Medicity’s suite of health information exchange solutions to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of health care in Vermont.”Since VITL began operations as an independent non-profit organization in 2005, it has been working to improve the care that Vermonters receive by enabling electronic communication between health care providers,” said David Cochran, MD, VITL’s president and CEO. “The selection of Medicity as our HIE partner, with its industry-leading technologies and vast experience with statewide health information exchange – will allow us to accelerate connecting Vermont’s health care providers and provide additional support to Vermont’s nation-leading health care reform efforts.”VITL’s Vermont Health Information Exchange (VHIE) currently connects eight Vermont hospitals to 29 physician practices with 116 practitioners so that physicians can receive lab results and other clinical reports electronically. Several physician practices and hospitals also transmit data via VITL to the state’s Blueprint for Health registry, which physicians use to analyze care and identify opportunities for improvement. With Medicity, VITL will expand the services available to its existing VHIE customers, as well as connect the remaining Vermont hospitals and physician practices to the VHIE and the Blueprint for Health registry. VITL will also extend HIE access to other Vermont health care organizations, including nursing homes and mental health agencies.Initially, VITL will deploy the HIE to automate healthcare transactions such as lab and radiology orders and results, distribution of discharge summaries, and transfer of clinical summaries to the Blueprint for Health registry. Medicity’s HIE will provide seamless communications between the many different brands of EHRs and hospital systems used in Vermont. In the next phase, VITL will roll out HIE services for data aggregation, patient matching and record location to implement a statewide community health record.”As the pace of health care reform quickens in Vermont, and the Blueprint for Health initiative expands statewide, VITL has a very large task ahead of it to connect all the state’s health care providers,” said Cochran. “We selected Medicity to help us complete this task because it has demonstrated in other states that it has both the technology and skills necessary to rapidly and successfully deploy a full suite of health information exchange services on a statewide level.””The Vermont HIE has already made significant strides in offering services to improve the continuity and quality of care,” said Brent Dover, Medicity’s president. “We are excited to partner with VITL to augment the HIE and extend the collaboration infrastructure to every care provider.”About VITLVITL is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that assists Vermont health care providers with adopting and using health information technology to improve patient care. Because VITL’s stakeholders come from both the private and public sectors, in essence VITL operates as a public-private partnership. VITL is both the designated health information exchange for the state of Vermont and the federally-designated regional extension center for the state of Vermont. For more information, visit vitl.net or follow us ontwitter.com/vitlvt.About MedicityMedicity, the industry standard for health information exchange (HIE), is the leading innovator and largest provider of HIE technology – with more than 750 hospitals and 250,000 end users in its connected ecosystem. Medicity’s solutions empower hospitals, physicians and HIEs with secure access to and exchange of health information – improving the quality and efficiency of patient care locally, regionally and nationally. For more information, please visit www.medicity.com(link is external) or follow us on twitter.com/Medicity. MONTPELIER, Vt. – March 2, 2011-Vermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL)last_img read more

All I Want for Christmas…


first_imgAll right all you good little boys and girls, let’s think about what we want Santa put under the tree this year.How about a wool PISGAH jersey made by local Pisgah Works? It’s a full zip, with a silver pull ornately designed as a dragon. It has a hood, complete with tiny visor so that it can be worn under the helmet. The visor keeps your face from being leaked on by the annoying drip through the slits in the helmet. The extra-long sleeves have thumb-holes, which are perfect for those days you don’t want a gap between your glove and sleeves. It’s even perfect on the days you almost needed gloves. Of course it has snug rear pockets. The best part is how frigging cool you look, and everybody tells you so.You just can’t get enough base layers, either. That includes socks, which have become nearly as important as shorts. DeFeet, which is a local company, has always kept my toes comfy whether they’re wet in the summer or the winter. Everybody needs a thin, long-sleeve thermal layer with a neckline that doesn’t choke or bind and tucks down low into the shorts. As for tights, it’s that time of year that if you don’t have fleece tights, you probably won’t ride.Since buying whimsical, yet highly functional gear can be a little costly, a great stocking stuffer would be a cool riding shirt from Club Ride. Not only do you look like a sexy cowboy, but the material does not hold stink. You can finish an epic Sunday in it and still wear it to work the next morning. Not only is the line American made by some hot dude in Idaho, but he buys tricot material from a local company who also serves Patagonia.Who wants to struggle anymore with a hand pump. What we need is a sturdy floor pump with a gauge. It works well for cars and motorcycle tires too.It’s pretty much guaranteed that riders are going to go through some tubes, so might as well fill the stocking with a few to stash in the backpack. Other safety necessities might be a small first aid kit (with painkillers and a suture kit). Even a whistle is a good idea, as well as a fistful of Cliff Cubes, which are yummy gummies filled with the necessities for trail-burned legs on a long ride.Speaking of packs, Camelbak is no longer the only choice for hydration. Osprey has busted out with a system that craves details. The bladder has a long handle and screw top that never suctions on too tightly, requiring a Hulk grip to open it. It has a firm back that allows the bladder to slide easily into the pack, providing a smooth surface on the rider’s back. It has small, waterproof, zipped compartments that can be washed out. Never does the tube down to the valve flop around tapping your knee in that irritating fashion. The chest strap has a super magnet that holds the valve in place, just inches from your thirsty lips. Plus, they’ve got a cool purple one that funds breast cancer research.The only other thing I can think of beyond a Go-Pro video camera is a small private fridge in the garage filled with beer.last_img read more

U.S. Says that Fighting Drug Use Reduces Violence in Latin America


first_imgBy Dialogo July 29, 2009 Mexico City, 27 July (EFE).- U.S. drug czar Gil Kerlikowske, speaking today in the Mexican capital, affirmed that preventing and treating addictions, particularly with regard to the use of narcotics, “is fundamental” for reducing violence caused by drug trafficking in Latin America. “When we put more emphasis on prevention and treatment, we’re not only helping our own country (the U.S.); we’re also helping to reduce violence” in the region, said the director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, who is on a four-day visit to Mexico. “If we cut down on the use of drugs, we will also be able to cut down on violence and crime in Mexico and in Latin America,” Kerlikowske said while touring a treatment center for addicted minors, where he was accompanied by Mexico’s first lady, Margarita Zavala, and the Mexican Secretary of Health, José Ángel Córdova. The official affirmed that U.S. policy in the fight against drugs seeks to understand, appreciate, and support work done in other countries. He commented that 20 million individuals over twelve years of age used drugs in the last month in the United States, and around 23 million Americans need treatment. “Only ten percent of these people end up in treatment, in part because it’s not available, and because people think they don’t need it,” he added. Mexico’s first lady, Margarita Zavala, agreed that the fight against drugs is fundamental because “drug use generates violence, destroys families, and destroys society.” During the event Iris Vianney Velázquez Martínez, a young patient at the New Life Center, affirmed that she is addicted to alcohol and that with the treatment she has received, she has learned how to make decisions and how to avoid hurting those she loves the most. In the country there are 320 centers like New Life which also provide outpatient services for early detection and prompt treatment of addictions.last_img read more

Active global equity fees have dropped 11% since 2017: LCP


first_imgThe average annual fee for a £50m investment mandate was 65bps, down from 73bps in 2017, saving £40,000 a year, according to the consultant.It added that the largest contributing factor to declining fees was decreasing allocations to active equity mandates.LCP calculated that, as a result of DB schemes changing their asset allocations since 2010, the average scheme was paying more in fees to credit and liability-driven investment managers than to equity managers.Fixed income costs on the riseWhile the average fee for actively managed global equity had decreased by £40,000 for a £50m mandate, the cost of a similar-sized corporate bond mandate had risen by £35,000.LCP suggested that the increase in fixed income fees could be due to pension funds’ demand for bespoke and more sophisticated fixed income strategies.The survey also found wide variations in reported transaction costs for listed infrastructure and actively managed global equity.“This illustrated the need to ask managers to explain and justify these costs,” said LCP.Matt Gibson, head of investment research at LCP, said that falling investment manager fees had allowed investors the opportunity to renegotiate their fees to the new market level.However, he highlighted that reduced costs didn’t always result in value for money “as fees and costs should be considered against the value created by the investment manager”.The LCP survey found that transaction costs for global equity and corporate bonds added 25% and 45%, respectively, to asset management costs on average.It noted that, despite regulatory pressure, many asset managers had not been able to provide detailed transaction cost information, only providing a full breakdown of these costs for 170 of the 677 surveyed products.LCP said that a change in regulation at the end of 2017 had allowed for accurate and comparable analysis of transaction costs data for UK institutional investors for the first time in the history of the survey.The LCP survey was conducted among 71 asset management organisations and covered 49 asset classes.Further readingManagers urged to comply with new cost disclosure templates The UK could legislate to enforce new cost transparency codes if investment managers and service providers do not comply voluntarily, the country’s pensions minister has warnedCost transparency poses threat to asset managers, says Moody’sThe UK’s newly launched investment cost reporting templates could hurt asset managers’ business models and financial stability The average fee for an actively managed global equity mandate for a UK institutional investor has fallen by 11% since 2017, according to LCP.In its latest Investment Management Fee Survey, the consultancy cited increased competition and downward pressure from low-cost index trackers as the main reasons for the fall.The survey also revealed “notable” fee reductions in a range of other key asset classes, including multi-asset diversified growth funds, multi-asset credit, liability-driven investment strategies, and passive global equity mandates.The pensions adviser estimated that a typical £500m (€548m) defined benefit (DB) pension fund in the UK had seen a reduction in total investment fees from 39 basis points to 36bps, or £140,000 a year, in the past 10 years.last_img read more