Dilemma, apartheid’s lost film


first_imgCD AndersonThe anti-apartheid film Dilemma (also known as A World of Strangers) is based on a novel by Nadine Gordimer, that depicts divisions and boundaries between ordinary South Africans during the early years of apartheid. The novel was banned in South Africa for 12 years.Dilemma, the 1962 docudrama by Henning Carlsen was secretly filmed in apartheid-era South Africa (pic: Getty Images) pic.twitter.com/dBYEyM7eln— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 9, 2016Filmed in South Africa by renowned Danish documentarian Henning Carlsen in 1962, the gritty black-and-white drama was filmed in secret. It offered international audiences their first glimpse behind the veil of how apartheid was taking its toll on the country.At the time, Carlsen had arrived in South Africa with a small film crew, telling government officials he was in the country to film a documentary about South African music and, bizarrely, “an industrial film about South African housewives and their refrigerators”, according to a 2013 blog post.Instead, he gathered a group of local actors, included Zakes Mokae and Evelyn Frank, to tell the story of Toby (Ivan Jackson), a wide-eyed young businessman facing difficult choices in a country in turmoil.At first oblivious to the deep-seated racial prejudices of white South Africans, Toby befriends an anti-apartheid activist (Frank) and a black South African (Mokae). Both of them, through a number of fervent discussions and clandestine visits to townships, open his eyes to the oppression of the system.The harsh realities of this divided society force him to choose between living a blissfully unaware middle class life in the suburbs or using his influence to change the system. It is a choice that itself, ultimately, has tragic consequences.Dilemma was secretly shot at various private locations around Johannesburg and Soweto, including the affluent white suburb of Sandringham and assorted Soweto shebeens. Carlsen smuggled completed film reels out of South Africa through the Danish embassy, according to the 2013 blog post, written on behalf of Frank’s son, Eddie Frank.For a detailed account of the making of the film, read the blog.In the film’s hauntingly striking opening scene, a hurried early morning commute out of the smoky haze of Soweto, accompanied by a frantic African jazz percussion soundtrack, contains jarring juxtapositions of everyday life in 1960s apartheid South Africa.Between gritty, fly-on-the-wall depictions of South African life, Dilemma contains a host of great South African music supplied by legendary jazz pianist Gideon “Mgibe” Nxumalo. There are also performances by Tandi Mpambane (Klaasen), Abigail Kubeka, Kippie Moeketsi and Wanda Makhubu.In 2008, the film’s music-rich shebeen scenes were featured in the Jazz Scores exhibition at the New York Museum of Modern Art, which celebrated jazz music and its role in film and politics. The New York Times hailed the film as “a crown jewel” of South African musical authenticity and heritage.South African actor Zakes Mokae in Dilemma, the 1962 anti-apartheid film by Henning Carlsen. pic.twitter.com/ql9gByGYkA— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 9, 2016Similar to the work of 1960s American independent cinéma vérité filmmaker John Cassavetes, Dilemma mixes ironic humour with powerful, visual elements. The improvised, urgent acting is passionate yet realistic, particularly from Mokae. He went on to build a long, illustrious career as a character actor in Hollywood until his death in 2009.Frank left South Africa shortly after the film was made, to become a respected theatre actress in Europe and the United States.Carlsen became one of Denmark’s most revered filmmakers, making films such as the award-winning social realism film The Hunger (1966) and a film version of the Gabriel García Márquez novella Memories of my Melancholy Whores in 2012. Carlsen died in 2014.Gordimer, Carlsen, Mokae and Frank reunited in 1996 to commemorate the making of the film for a Danish television documentary, titled Revisiting Johannesburg.SAfrican actors Evelyn Frank & Zakes Mokae remember the 1962 anti-apartheid film Dilemma https://t.co/KnnkU4E49k pic.twitter.com/t3dRJi1fQh— CD Anderson (@bizarrojerri) September 9, 2016Watch scenes from the film Dilemma, courtesy of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival YouTube page.A viewing and discussion of the film’s music scenes will be held at the Alliance Française Johannesburg during the September Jive South African musical heritage exhibition on 16 September 2016. For more details, visit the exhibition web page.Source: Tusker Geographica blogWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

LeBron calls for love, unity before taking swipe at Trump


first_imgCleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James speaks while holding his daughter, Zhuri, during the We Are Family Reunion at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017. (Erin McLaughlin/The Sandusky Register via AP)SANDUSKY, Ohio — Along with getting good grades and listening to their parents, LeBron James has encouraged kids in his foundation’s educational program to stand up for their beliefs.On Tuesday night, the superstar gave a lesson in how it’s done.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Concluding a day of fun and games at an amusement park, James turned serious when speaking about the recent violence and tragedy in Charlottesville. James also took a pointed swipe at President Donald Trump, calling him the “so-called president.”While holding his young daughter, Zhuri, James stood on stage before an excited crowd of students, parents and others connected to the LeBron James Family Foundation and delivered his emotional message.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“I know there’s a lot of tragic things happening in Charlottesville,” James said to cap the annual event at Cedar Point amusement park. “I have this platform and I’m somebody that has a voice of command, and the only way for us to get better as a society and for us to get better as people is love. And that’s the only way we’re going to be able to conquer something as one.”Then, James, who endorsed Hillary Clinton last year and introduced her at a rally in Cleveland just two days before the election, went at Trump, whom he has criticized in the past. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Valdez, PH volleyball take lessons from losses in AVC Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo MOST READ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LATEST STORIES NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Now in its sixth year, James’ foundation has brought hope to children who might not have any otherwise. If the students meet certain criteria, stay in the program and graduate, they can receive full tuition to the University of Akron.“That means everything,” Latasha McCullough said as she sat with her husband, Arthur, and children Arlissa and Arsea while waiting for James to appear on stage.The McCulloughs have been directly impacted by James and his work, and they’re forever grateful.“He doesn’t have to do anything,” Latasha said. “All he is responsible for are his kids, his family, go to work and provide for his, but he does it for his city. He does it for everybody, everybody’s kids. All the things he didn’t have growing up, he’s giving it to our kids with no problem and he’s not being selfish. It’s constant and consistent, you earn what you get.”James has grown his foundation beyond its initial goals of tackling the city’s drop-out rate. Next year, the charity will open the I Promise School, designed to help students who have already fallen behind and need extra attention.Michelle Campbell, executive director of the LeBron James Family Foundation, is awed by what the group has accomplished.James has led the way.“It’s never enough with him,” she said. “He is always pushing, just like on the basketball court, pushing and pushing. I could have never imagined what we have done and are doing, but with his belief and what he wants to do and his drive and his ability to put all these partners around us. We can’t fail.“It started out with working with kids and changing a child, then OK, we got the family involved and we learned that some didn’t have their high school diplomas, so we broke down those barriers. Now he’s changing a whole community. He’s uplifting this whole community, on his back.” Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “It’s not about the guy that’s the so-called president of the United States, or whatever the case. It’s not about a teacher that you don’t feel like cares about what’s going on with you every day. It’s not about people that you just don’t feel like want to give the best energy and effort to you. It’s about us. It’s about us looking in the mirror. Kids all the way up to the adults. All of us looking in the mirror and saying, ‘What can we do better to help change?’ And if we can all do that and give 110 percent, then that’s all you can ask for.“So, shout-out to the innocent people in Charlottesville and shout-out to everybody across the world that just want to be great and just want to love. Thank you, and I love you all.”James’ remarks ended a star-studded show that included pop stars Jordin Sparks and Usher as well as his Cavaliers’ teammate J.R. Smith. They stood alongside him for his message along with his sons, Bronny and Bryce.There had been a celebratory vibe all day, as James hosted nearly 7,000 of his foundation’s students and their families, who strolled around the immense park best known for its roller-coasters wearing light blue T-shirts with “We Are Family” across the fronts.It was as if James’ hometown of Akron had all gone out together for the day, and that was exactly the point of the event — to celebrate the successes of kids committed to making more of their lives.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

SC gives BCCI, Modi time to negotiate on probe panel


first_imgCan the BCCI and Lalit Modi reach a compromise on the issue of the disciplinary committee set up to probe allegations against the former IPL commissioner? At least the Supreme Court has given the two parties time till Wednesday to try and reach a deal.Modi’s lawyer Ram Jethmalani told the Supreme Court on Thursday that a compromise was possible on the issue and was being attempted.This comes even as the BCCI has outrightly rejected Modi’s demand that the disciplinary committee be reconstituted. Modi’s plea has been that the committee is biased against him.Mehmood Abdi, one of Modi’s lawyers, said: “The proposal was floated mutually by the counsels of the two sides. I hope good sense prevails upon the BCCI and they agree to it.””We want an independent panel to look into the charges against Modi,” Abdi told Headlines Today. But even as a compromise was being attempted, Abdi has hit out at BCCI secretary N. Srinivasan over a police complaint filed against the former IPL commissioner.”The government machinery in Chennai is being used against Modi, which is why the case was filed in Chennai and not Mumbai,” Abdi said.last_img read more