Packaging watch


first_imgAccording to Mintel’s latest report, Ethical and Green Retailing, June 2007, released this month, as many as two-thirds of consumers believe retailers should do more to reduce the amount of packaging they use.Over half (55%) say that retailers and producers, including bakery, should only use packaging materials that can easily be recycled. “The finding that nearly three-quarters of adults claim to be active recyclers makes it all the more irritating that the recycling infrastructure is not better developed than it is. Although retailers and manufacturers have been active in reducing packaging for some time, consumers are still not satisfied and clearly feel that there is more to be done,” said senior retail analyst Neil Mason.In July, bakery chain Greggs, announced that it had saved £12,000 in three months through recycling waste plastic from its Yorkshire stores, after teaming up with Leeds-based Cromwell Polythene. After Greggs’ vehicles have delivered to the shops, the drivers load waste plastics, such as waste packaging, and take them back to a central Yorkshire depot. From there, Cromwell Polythene’s Recycling Division collects the plastic and converts it into sacks and bags, some of which are returned to Greggs for general waste and segregation of waste plastic.As a result of the scheme, Greggs received a commendation at this year’s Business Commitment to the Environment Awards, which was presented by former environment secretary, David Miliband. The commendation recognised Greggs’ commitment to reduce the amount of waste it sends to landfill.last_img read more

Four Nations future remains clouded


first_imgAustralia were victorious in Sunday’s Four Nations final, beating New Zealand 34-8 at Anfield, but the Rugby League International Federation’s chief executive David Collier does not know if or when the tournament will be held again.The 2017 World Cup, which will be held in Australia and New Zealand from next October to December, will bring to an end the RLIF’s current calendar of events.Although the Federation has confirmed the 2021 World Cup will take place in England and the 2025 competition in North America, there is currently nothing set in stone for the intervening years.Collier told Press Association Sport there is a consensus for an eight-team event, which could be good news for Scotland, but that is unlikely to take place until 2023.”I think eventually the eight nations will become the Four Nations on steroids, so it has a growth spurt to it,” Collier said.”We want a second major event and we made a decision on Saturday that we will play that in 2023 and we will go out to tender fairly soon for a destination.”There is a gap in the first four-year cycle, so there is potential still for a Four Nations but that will be up to the three major nations to determine.”We call 2021 and 2025 the bookends – the three major nations in particular needed to know exactly where the major events are going to be played.”Once we got the global events away, they fill in the rest and I think they are going to be making announcements fairly quickly as to what they are going to play in the interim period.”With Australia almost certain to take a sabbatical from the international game in 2018 as part of an agreement with their NRL players, there is scope for another Four Nations Series in 2019 but the potential return of the Kangaroos or British Lions tours is back on the agenda, as well as an international nines competition.”There was discussion over whether we wanted to trial a nines tournament so we might well go out to tender to see what happens,” Collier said.”I think nines is very much more destination based so I think we’d be looking for a warm destination, although there is also interest from one of the major nations to get it up and running so we may want to look at a World Cup of nines.”last_img read more