Ajit Wadekar brought out the best in us in 1990s: Sachin Tendulkar


first_imgSachin Tendulkar on Thursday paid tribute to former India captain Ajit Wadekar, who passed away at an age of 77.Wadekar breathed his last at Mumbai’s Jaslok Hospital on Wednesday. The former left-handed batsman, who will always be remembered as one of the greatest captains to have led the Indian cricket team, was Indian cricket team’s manager from 1992 to 1996. He was also appointed as India’s chairman of selectors in 1998.Wadekar is believed to be have played a pivotal role in turning around Tendulkar’s career by asking him to open the innings in ODIs during the tour of New Zealand in 1994. The decision to move Tendulkar to the top of India’s batting order proved to be extremely successful, as the batting maestro went on to become the greatest limited-overs cricketer.In his tribute, Tendulkar wrote: “Deeply saddened to hear about the demise of Ajit Wadekar Sir. He was someone who was instrumental in bringing out the best in us during the 90s. Well always be grateful for his advice and guidance. Praying for strength for his family during this difficult time. RIP.”Deeply saddened to hear about the demise of Ajit Wadekar Sir. He was someone who was instrumental in bringing out the best in us during the 90s. Well always be grateful for his advice and guidance. Praying for strength for his family during this difficult time. RIP pic.twitter.com/coSyac73otSachin Tendulkar (@sachin_rt) August 16, 2018Mohammed Azharuddin, who was India’s captain during Wadekar’s tenure as India manager, tweeted: “#AjitWadekar sir .. such an iconic person..deeply saddened by his demise!! Sir was a father figure for me.. May his soul rest in peace! My Heartfelt Condolences to the family..”advertisement#AjitWadekar sir .. such an iconic person..deeply saddened by his demise!! Sir was a father figure for me.. May his soul rest in peace! My Heartfelt Condolences to the [email protected] pic.twitter.com/xLMb2i82B2Mohammed Azharuddin (@azharflicks) August 15, 2018Deeply saddened by the news of the demise of #AjitWadekar. One of Indias finest left handers and the captain who led India to victories in England & West Indies in 1971. Sir, your contribution to Indian cricket has been immense. Condolences to your family. RIP.Robin Aiyuda Uthappa (@robbieuthappa) August 16, 2018Wadekar played 37 Tests for India and scored 2113 runs including one hundred and 14 half-centuries at an average of 31.07.READ – Former India cricket captain Ajit Wadekar dies aged 77Wadekar led India to historic series triumphs in the West Indies and England in 1971. An aggressive left-handed batsman, Wadekar made his first-class debut in 1958-59 but did not play for India until 1966-67.READ – Farewell Ajit Wadekar: Captain Courageous, Gutsy ManagerWadekar took over as captain of the Indian team from MAK Pataudi and proved to be a good leader of men. After leading the country to memorable series wins in the West Indies and England, Wadekar oversaw another series win over England in 1972-73, at home.last_img read more

Signs of Movement on Marijuana Issue in Annapolis


first_imgMaryland could soon see a stronger marijuana decriminalization law. It seems well on the path to outright legalization (though perhaps not this session), if the tone of last week’s Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee hearing on a slate of marijuana bills is any indication.Senate Bill 456 establishes medical necessity as an affirmative defense against a marijuana possession charge and requires the court to dismiss the charges under these circumstances. Senate Bill 517 extends decriminalization to all amounts of marijuana, and Senate Bill 531 creates a legal marketplace for marijuana in Maryland. The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard all three bills simultaneously on March 4.Sen. Bobby Zirkin (D-Baltimore County), chair of Judicial Proceedings and sponsor of the two of the bills, scheduled these items ahead of the 14 others to be heard that day, providing ample time for those who came to testify in marked contrast to the scheduling of the criminal justice bills heard earlier this session.Sara Love, public policy director for the ACLU Maryland, was first to testify in support of the bills. She noted that in 70 percent of searches conducted by police with smelling marijuana as the probable cause, no drugs were found, suggesting that the claim is often a pretense for search and seizure. By extension, Love argued, laws criminalizing the use or possession of marijuana have become a pretext for otherwise unconstitutional searches that have racially disparate impacts, necessitating the reform of such laws.Sen. James Brochin (D-Baltimore County) pushed Love on her claim, and asked, if in 30 percent of searches police did find drugs or worse, was it not worth preserving their ability to search. “We have a system in our society where police aren’t just allowed to go in [and search],” said Love. “Is it worth it if [police] search everybody’s houses if they find extra guns and drugs? No, because we have a system of justice. They have to have probable cause to believe that that person is breaking the law.”When Brochin continued asking if the search results indicated marijuana was a gateway to further illegal activity, Zirkin interrupted stating that Brochin’s teenage daughter, seated behind her father, was shaking her head in disagreement.The hearing room broke out in laughter, and a lightness of mood underscored the movement that has occurred on the issue of marijuana in Maryland. Though some senators expressed lingering skepticism about the growing body of research showing fewer deleterious effects of marijuana as compared to alcohol, no one forced that particular point.At one point, Sen. Bob Cassilly (R-Harford County) seemed interested in finding a way to address some of the social consequences marijuana laws have wrought on the state (labor issues related to drug convictions ), even if he would prefer the laws otherwise remain on the books.If opposition among the committee’s senators seemed tepid, support for the various measures from members of Judicial Proceedings was much more aggressive, with opposition testimony facing some strong headwinds.When Joseph Cassilly of the Harford County State’s Attorney’s Office testified in opposition to legalization, Sen. Jamie Raskin (D-Montgomery County), sponsor of the legalization bill, asked whether alcohol was more addictive than marijuana.“Look at the scientific studies,” said Cassilly. “I’m not going to give you my personal opinion.”“All the studies that have been forwarded to us have [found] that [alcohol] is far more addictive. It’s not even close,” Raskin replied.After Chief David Morris, as a representative of the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association, asserted that for every study supporters produced to bolster their claims, opponents could produce a study showing the opposite, Zirkin pounced.“Sen. [Christopher] Shank and I were looking last year high and low for any evidence that decriminalization – not legalization, but decriminalization – had any of the ill-effects that the chiefs stated at their press conference last year,” said Zirkin. “We found none. I mean literally zero, in any state that when they moved from a criminal sanction to a civil sanction, that there was any of the ill-effects that you’ve said. We asked for the evidence last year and we got nothing. Over the interim, we’ve gotten nothing. And at this point in time, I’ve still got nothing.”Zirkin then suggested Morris provide whatever data he had available, but the message seemed clear – this debate is guided by data, and the data strongly leans in the direction of passing, at the minimum, a stronger decriminalization bill.There was no real indication legalization will become a reality this session, but the legislative landscape seems to be tilting in that direction, with strong support, at least in Judicial Proceedings, for further movement away from the criminalization that has been the historic approach towards marijuana in Maryland. [email protected]last_img read more

Researchers theorize cold compression of graphite results in new superhard carbon allotropes


first_img © 2012 PhysOrg.com Crystal structure of H-carbon(a), initial AB stacking graphite supercell for H-carbon (b) and side view containing five and seven carbon rings of H-carbon (c). Crystal structure of S-carbon (d), initial AB stacking graphite supercell for Scarbon (e) and side view containing five and seven carbon rings of S-carbon (f). Image from arXiv:1203.5509v1 (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers in China have used math calculations to predict that under cold compression, two new carbon allotropes may be formed. In their paper pre-published on arXiv, the team describes how the two new allotropes would have a hardness factor somewhere between graphite and diamond. New carbon allotrope could have a variety of applications This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: New Superhard Carbon Phases Between Graphite and Diamond, arXiv:1203.5509v1 [cond-mat.mtrl-sci] arxiv.org/abs/1203.5509AbstractTwo new carbon allotropes (H-carbon and S-carbon) are proposed, as possible candidates for the intermediate superhard phases between graphite and diamond obtained in the process of cold compressing graphite, based on the results of first-principles calculations.Both H-carbon and S-carbon are more stable than previously proposed M-carbon and W-carbon and their bulk modulus are comparable to that of diamond. H-carbon is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor with a gap of 4.459 eV and S-carbon is a direct-band-gap semiconductor with a gap of 4.343 eV. S-carbon is even more stable than the Z-carbon which is the most table carbon phase proposed recently. The transition pressure from cold compressing graphite is 10.08 GPa and 5.93 Gpa for H-carbon and S-carbon,respectively, which is in consistent with the recent experimental report.via Arxiv Blog Explore further An allotrope is a substance that is essentially the same as another, with just minor differences in structure. Thus, both graphite and diamonds are allotropes of carbon. In their paper, the research team shows, via mathematical calculations, that subjecting a graphite allotrope to varying degrees of both cold and high pressure, would result in small changes to the structure, resulting in two new carbon allotropes.Prior to this work, other researchers have theorized that applying pressure at room temperature (more than 10 GigaPascals) to graphite would also result in structural changes, creating new allotropes (M10-carbon, monoclinic M-carbon, orthorhombic W-carbon or cubic body center C4 carbon) though thus far it isn’t clear if those changes would remain in effect after the pressure is removed.The new allotropes that theoretically would be produced by exerting pressure under cold conditions, which the team have called H-carbon and S-carbon, would also apparently be more stable than the allotropes produced without the cold, and even more stable, they say, than graphite under pressure, which means they would be more likely to survive in their compressed state after being returned to normal conditions.By using mathematical models to predict the creation of new carbon allotropes, researchers pave the way for real world experiments to find out if the new materials would truly exist, and if so, to what purpose they might be used. New carbon allotropes would have different optical properties, such as their degree of transparency, for example or how well they reflect light, than already well understood allotropes that are already being used in real world applications,. Such properties in new allotropes, if they can be caused to persist under reasonable conditions, might lead to new and better products.But before researchers begin trying to produce these new allotropes, more theoretical work will need to be done to see if there are others out there still waiting to be discovered. Citation: Researchers theorize cold compression of graphite results in new superhard carbon allotropes (2012, March 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-theorize-cold-compression-graphite-results.htmllast_img read more