Rebels vs Force Highlights – Super Rugby 2013 Round 1


first_imgMonday Feb 18, 2013 Rebels vs Force Highlights – Super Rugby 2013 Round 1  Extended highlights from the opening match of Super Rugby 2013 between the Melbourne Rebels and the Western Force in Melbourne. View Brumbies vs Reds highlights here.Note: All Super Rugby clips will be posted at rugbydump.com/superrugby2013Time: 10:34Credit: kiwirugbyxvADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Super Rugby 2013 Related Articles 410 WEEKS AGO The Chiefs celebrate Super Rugby victory… 410 WEEKS AGO The Chiefs go back-to-back with Super Rugby… 411 WEEKS AGO Brumbies snatch victory from Bulls to reach… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Incredible backflip pass by Nathan Friend leads to great Rugby League Try


first_imgMonday Jul 13, 2015 Incredible backflip pass by Nathan Friend leads to great Rugby League Try So this happened in the NRL at the weekend. Yes, it’s not Union, but it is unbelievable, so we had to share it. Not only was the flip out of this world, but there was a great flick pass and some slick hands after that too, before stunned Melbourne Storm leaked a try in the process.Nathan Friend of the NZ Warriors got up high, took the catch then while realising he was going to flip and likely land on his head, he managed to get the pass away mid-air, through his legs. A few very neat passes later and Tuimoala Lolohea went over in the corner for a the try. Brilliant.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Rugby League , See it to Believe it Related Articles 185 WEEKS AGO Even in defeat Tongan fans show true passion… 310 WEEKS AGO Mic’d up league forward Ashton Sims is one… 348 WEEKS AGO Ben Flower red carded for vicious punching… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

New director for Samaritan’s Purse


first_img Tagged with: Management Recruitment / people Howard Lake | 18 April 2003 | News  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Samaritan’s Purse, the Christian international relief charity, has appointed David Vardy as its new Executive Director in the UK.He takes over from Rev David Applin who is retiring from the post which he has held for seven years. Advertisementcenter_img New director for Samaritan’s Purse About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1last_img read more

Newsmakers Podcast: Ted McKinney Interview


first_imgHome News Feed Newsmakers Podcast: Ted McKinney Interview SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Oct 6, 2017 Facebook Twitter Previous articleAfter the Rain more Good Harvest Weather Coming on the HAT Friday Morning EditionNext articleMorning Outlook Hoosier Ag Today This week Ted McKinney was confirmed as the first ever Undersecretary of Agriculture for Trade and Foreign Affairs. Following his confirmation, the first media full interview McKinney did was with Hoosier Ag Today’s Gary Truitt.Audio Playerhttps://dts.podtrac.com/redirect.mp3/s3.amazonaws.com/hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/newsmakers-podcast-McKinney.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Podcast (wirepodcastshat-rss): Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: RSS Newsmakers Podcast: Ted McKinney Interviewlast_img read more

Indiana Corn and Soybean Growers Discuss Policy with Legislators Over Breakfast


first_img By Eric Pfeiffer – Feb 12, 2019 Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Corn and Soybean Growers Discuss Policy with Legislators Over Breakfast Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE Indiana Corn and Soybean Growers Discuss Policy with Legislators Over BreakfastLt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch with Indiana Corn Marketing Council President Mike Beard (Photo Courtesy Lt. Gov. Crouch’s Facebook)Indiana corn and soybean farmers from around the state met with their state legislators Tuesday morning over breakfast to discuss bills that will have an impact on Indiana agriculture. Indiana Soybean Alliance director Dave Rodibaugh told Hoosier Ag Today that funding for Purdue University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital is on the docket this session. He says the funding is critically important to move the facility into the 21st century.“That’s important to us and to the public at large in order to help us deal with livestock and disease challenges with all the testing, protecting public health, as well as our own health of our herds.”They are also voicing their support for increased funding for Soil and Water Conservation Districts.“Groups that are farmer groups in each county that direct conservation efforts, work with the technical folks from USDA, and help to promote conservation which is one of our really top priorities.”The Indiana livestock sector continues to see bills regulating confined feeding operations and requiring annual inspection of CAFOs. Indiana Corn and Soybean is standing with the livestock sector in opposing those bills, as the livestock sector is their number one customer in the state.“The vast majority of soybeans raised in Indiana go to produce bean meal which we feed in our livestock rations, poultry and pork primarily. Then there’s the corn which goes into the diets of our pigs. It’s raised on our own farms, processed, and then use for pig feed. So, the value-added industry in the form of livestock is extremely important right here at home.”Numerous broadband expansion bills are also on the docket. Indiana Corn and Soy is in support of each of those bills to increase broadband efforts around the state. Facebook Twitter Indiana Corn and Soybean Growers Discuss Policy with Legislators Over Breakfast Previous articleAg Secretary Perdue Optimistic on US-China Trade DealNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for February 13, 2019 Eric Pfeifferlast_img read more

TCU professor gives tips on managing stress


first_imgCondensed semester, lost week to snowstorm adding to some students stress during finals week Twitter Linkedin ReddIt Facebook Students debut performances of drag personas as part of unique new course Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Linkedin Facebook ReddIt The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Fort Worth businessman donates full first-year tuition for TCU medical school studentscenter_img Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Twitter TCU steps up efforts to promote financial literacy with new additions to Money Week + posts Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Previous articleBeyoncé sparking discussions on race; students offer their takesNext articleBrian Howard shines in Frogs’ win Ryder Buttry RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Dr. Debbie Rhea, associate dean of the Harris College of Nursing & Health Sciences and kinesiology professor, shares ways to properly manage stress with Neeley Fellows. Update: No forced entry in TCC student’s homicide SGA holds student memorial to honor lives of four students printStudents often accept headaches, neck pain, and fatigue as symptoms of college life. But one TCU professor said these are actually signs of chronic stress.Debbie Rhea, associate dean of Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences and kinesiology professor, spoke to a group of Neeley Fellows last week about stress management and the effects of chronic stress on the body.Neeley Fellows is an undergraduate business honors program in the Neeley School of Business. Neeley Fellows take honors courses as a cohort, must maintain a 3.5 cumulative GPA, and complete departmental or university honors. Neeley Fellows also attend travel, service and co-curricular activities during the program.The workshop is part of the program’s “Lunch & Learn” series. Laura Barclay, director of Neeley Fellows, said the series focuses on topics that are of interest to students and is meant to help in their development.During the workshop, Rhea gave the Neeley Fellows tips that all TCU students can apply to their lives.Rhea emphasized the importance of using a calendar and “chunking” your schedule into blocks that allow adequate time for exercise, meals, and sleep.If stress isn’t managed properly, the symptoms of chronic stress can manifest into much bigger problems later in life, such as ADHD and arthritis, Rhea said.Rhea founded the LiiNK Project, a program focused on increasing recess time in elementary schools. Rhea said physical activity is just as important in the lives of college students, especially when it comes to stress management.“If [students] are studying at home or at the library, they have to get up and get away from it every 45 minutes to an hour to let that brain refocus,” Rhea said. Ryder Buttry last_img read more

Upgrade works to begin at Carndonagh and Buncrana hospitals


first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook Pinterest Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Junior Health Minister Jim Daly has confirmed that upgrade works at Carndonagh Community Hospital will begin in October, with works at the Community Nursing Unit in Buncrana to follow in 2020.The initial phase will involve the provision of temporary ward facilities at Buncrana to enable the transfer of beds from Carndonagh in order to maintain the overall bed compliment in the region.It’s anticipated the works will cost in the region of €6 million.Senator Padraig Mac Lochlainn says the community has been waiting a ling time for this work to start…..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/podhosps5pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest Harps come back to win in Waterford center_img FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 WhatsApp Previous articleMurphy voted GAA.ie Footballer of the WeekNext articleGardai in Donegal issue appeal after two properties broken into News Highland Facebook Upgrade works to begin at Carndonagh and Buncrana hospitals By News Highland – July 23, 2019 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR DL Debate – 24/05/21 Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+last_img read more

Jury set to get Weinstein sex assault case after dramatic trial


first_imgcsreed/iStock(NEW YORK) — After hearing from 35 witnesses over more than two weeks of testimony, the New York City jury in Harvey Weinstein’s rape and sexual assault case will begin deliberations Tuesday morning. Weinstein is facing five felony counts of rape and sexual assault, based on the testimony of two complaining witnesses: former Project Runway production assistant Miriam “Mimi” Haleyi — who claims the Hollywood producer sexually assaulted her in 2006, and an accuser who claims Weinstein raped her in a Manhattan hotel suite in 2013. ABC News is not naming the rape accuser because she has never publicly identified herself. The other five women either did so, or their lawyers gave ABC permission to name them.The account of a third accuser, Annabella Sciorra, is too old to prosecute, but a judge allowed her to testify in support of two predatory sexual assault charges — which require prosecutors to prove that Weinstein attacked at least three women. In order to convict on either of the two predatory sexual assault charges, the jury must believe either Sciorra and Haleyi’s accounts, or Sciorra and the rape accuser’s account.Three additional women — Dawn Dunning, Tarale Wulff and Lauren Young testified as “prior bad acts” witness to demonstrate the prosecution’s contention that Weinstein engaged in a pattern of predatory behavior — essentially seeking sexual favors in return for providing career opportunities. Prosecutors portrayed the accusers in opening arguments as unsuspecting women who sought out professional opportunities but got more than they bargained for. Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast’s opening arguments spotlighted some of the extraordinary challenges prosecutors face in seeking to convict Weinstein for crimes that took place years ago and include no physical or forensic evidence.Hast outlined the accounts of numerous witnesses allegedly overpowered by Weinstein who — nervous, upset and confused — sometimes gave up the physical struggle against him and simply stopped resisting. In some instances, the accusers returned to Weinstein time and time again, despite emotionally and physically devastating alleged sexual assaults. Both complaining witnesses maintained contact with Weinstein after their alleged assaults, and defense attorneys portrayed all of Weinstein’s six accusers at trial as ambitious women navigating a ruthlessly competitive industry, who “relabeled” consensual sexual encounters as assaults once allegations about Weinstein were published in the fall of 2017 in The New York Times and The New Yorker. “We’re not victim-shaming,” defense attorney Damon Cheronis said in opening arguments. “Victim is a conclusion attained only after trial. These are complaining witnesses.” “What you are going to see throughout this trial is that they wanted to have it both ways,” Cheronis said. “You can’t say, ‘I’m afraid of this man, I can’t get away from him,’ and then reach out to him to see if he’ll be in L.A. for your birthday.”Prosecutors contended that the accusers were “tricked” into being alone with Weinstein, and then suddenly sexually assaulted. Of scores of women who have publicly accused Weinstein of sexual assault or misconduct, only six were subject to public testimony and the withering cross-examinations that followed. Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Joan Illuzzi underscored their commitment in closing arguments. “They didn’t come for a beauty contest. They didn’t come for money. They didn’t come for fame. They came to be heard,” she said. “They sacrificed their dignity, their privacy and their peace for the prospect of having that voice, and their voices would be enough for justice,” she added. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Finance sector slow to gear up for new rules


first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Finance sector slow to gear up for new rulesOn 4 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Employers in the finance sector risk fines because many HR professionals arenot prepared for the Financial Services and Markets Act which came into forceon December 1. Robbie Gilbert, chief executive of the Employers Forum on Practice andStatute, is concerned that some HR departments are not aware of theirresponsibilities in helping companies comply with the Act, which is regulatedby the Financial Services Authority. Under the regulations, firms in the finance sector must ensure employees areproperly qualified and trained or risk action – including fines – from the FSA.Gilbert said, “We share the FSA’s concerns that HR is not preparedacross the sector. It has not taken on board the extent to which people’scompetencies and development have to be checked – from chief executivesdownwards, not simply those directly involved with financial regulation.” David Jackman, FSA head of industry training, urged HR professionals in thesector to get up to speed on the requirements. “Anecdotal evidence suggests that some firms may not be prepared and inparticular there may not be an awareness within HR departments that these rulesaffect them. “There needs to be an effective partnership between line management andHR to make these requirements work. Jackman stressed HR must also be aware of the Act when recruiting. “HRdepartments need to be familiar with the rules on recruitment as these includethe need to relate the skills and knowledge of a potential employee to theknowledge and skills required for a role, and the taking of reasonable steps toobtain sufficient information about a potential employee’s previous relevantactivities and training.” www.fsa.gov.ukUnder the Act firms must ensure: – Employees are competent – Employees remain competent for the work they do – Employees are appropriately supervised – Employees’ competence is regularly reviewed and the level of competence isappropriate to the nature of the business last_img read more

Handling training


first_imgBOXTEXT: Lifts classified as ‘unsafe’ RCN 1998 Comments are closed. Cross arm lift    Draw sheet lift Combine lift Handling trainingOn 1 Aug 2003 in Clinical governance, Musculoskeletal disorders, Personnel Today Shoulder slide   2 poles canvas lift (quantitative)     (qualitative) Through arm lift            Walkingperson linking arms Related posts:No related photos. Non-experimental         Ethnographic (quasi) strategy study    Grounded theory This article examines new RCN training guidance – both abook and a conference – on handling patients, by Greta Thornbory Musculoskeletal injuries top the list of cases caused or made worse by work,according to statistics from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) 2001/2,especially those which result in injuries involving handling, lifting andcarrying.1 This is particularly relevant to those whose manual handlinginvolves handling people. The past 12 months have seen a renewal of thetraining guidance from the Royal College of Nursing (RCN 2003)2 and thepublication of the book Evidence-based patient handling (Hignet et al 2003).3With quality healthcare under the auspices of clinical governance, practiceshould be evidence-based and patient handling is no exception. The RCN followed up its guidance and the publication of Evidence-Basedpatient handling with a conference in London. Welcoming delegates to theconference, Carol Bannister, OH adviser RCN, said the event was designed toallow discussions around the book’s findings and to examine the potential ofthe work in affecting patient handling practice. The book aimed to ‘bringtogether all available research in a systematic literature review framework’(Evidence-based patient handling, p3) and covered the background to researchand research criteria, as well as the results from the literature. Three of the six contributing authors presented papers at the conference,together with Howard Richmond from the RCN legal services, Sally Williams fromthe HSE and Patricia Bartley, who introduced her work on a new approach topatient handling training. The papers were followed by five concurrentworkshops based on the issues raised. Dr Sue Hignett is a lecturer in ergonomics at the University ofLoughborough, and is leading a research project for the HSE to measure theeffectiveness of competency-based education and training programmes in changingthe manual handling behaviour of healthcare staff. At the conference, she gavea rundown of the different research methodologies, critical appraisal anddiscussed the nature of research evidence. By using the critical appraisalapproach, she has developed a systematic review of all the evidence to date onpatient handling for the book. Consequently, her work provides a much-needed resource for all healthcareprofessionals. One of the significant aspects of Dr Hignett’s paper was theacceptance of research that was different from the medical model’s ‘randomisedcontrol trials’ and it explored more suitable research designs (see box below).This session was an excellent refresher for those who do not have dailyinvolvement, or who are new to, research. The second speaker, Sue Ruszala, is a manual handling and ergonomics adviserto United Bristol Healthcare NHS Trust. She spoke on the ‘controversialissues’, reviewing the evidence and explaining why some techniques, onceaccepted practice, were now regarded as hazardous. Cartoon pictures ofcontroversial lifts from the illustrator, Moira Munro, supported her talk. Techniques were regarded as controversial if they were condemned,inappropriate, and unsafe or presented a risk of injury – see box below. One ofthe questions Ruszala asked was why, when there is research to support lifts ashazardous, are they still used? Emma Crumpton, consultant ergonomist for the RCN then presented her Back inWork project, ‘Changing practice, improving health’. (Crumpton et al 2001).4This work was funded by the Department of Health (England) and the HSE.Previously, projects had focused mainly on the moving and handling of patients.This project took place in three nursing homes in the Home Counties and wasbased on the three core concepts or themes of: – The prevention of injury – Identifying causes of musculoskeletal health – The promotion of good staff health and healthy backs The initial objectives were to raise staff awareness through focus groups,identifying problems and solutions by using a problem-solving approach andupdating resident’s care plans. Training played an important part, as did therationalisation of equipment provision. OH was also regarded as one of the core aspects, and identifying suitable OHprovision was a priority. Outcomes were measured by a database, withinformation from residents’ care plans, staff perceptions, a back questionnaireand also a StaDyMeter, which is a form of ‘frequency log’ or self completingdiary. Results of these interventions showed care had improved, and exposure tomanual handling had decreased. Other factors it was concluded, were that‘effective management is an absolute prerequisite for the change process to beeffective in reducing back symptoms in care staff’. This session concluded thepresentation from the authors of the book. Patricia Bartley from movement specialists Corpus shared information fromthe process of implementing outcome-based training. Bartley previously workedin one of the largest NHS trusts in the UK and had first-hand experience of thedifficulties associated with generic based patient handling training – time andmoney being key to the problems. She outlined how they had identified problems that could be overcome bypeople using the simple format of TILE (task; individual; load; environment)and highlighting the need for individuals to carry out risk assessments forthemselves. Simple factors that had been overlooked by practitioners were things such asencouraging patients to move for themselves and learning to use equipment, ieadjusting the height of beds. Personal injury litigation and human and disability rights are high on theagenda for many practitioners who have to undertake manual handling tasks inless than ideal environments. Recent litigation has highlighted these factors and raised the issue ofwhether one can refuse to lift patients who themselves refuse to be liftedusing a hoist. Howard Richmond, deputy director of legal services at the RCN, discussedseveral cases that had occurred over the past few years. One factor raised in a particular case was that the local authorities hadnot undertaken sufficient risk assessments and the courts ruled that it was notthe court’s place to do so, but that it was for the local authority as theemployer, to formulate manual handling policies. Within the same case, mention was made of the dignity of the patient when usinga hoist, as it was felt that it could be regarded as ‘undignified’. Therefore,the employers’ risk assessment for the employee was of great importance (HSE2002) if the patient or client was refusing to be lifted using a hoist.5 Sally Williams, HSE inspector, was the last speaker of the day, andexplained how the criminal statutory framework influences patient handlingpractice. Williams highlighted the six pieces of legislation which provide thelegal framework on patient/client handling in the UK: – Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 – Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 – National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990 – Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union – European Convention for the protection of Human Rights and FundamentalFreedoms – Community Care (Direct Payments) Act 1996 She also identified the six factors necessary for the successfulimplementation of a risk management system: – Senior management commitment – Worker involvement – Risk assessment – Control measures – Instruction and training – Proper management of cases This was followed by some examples of prosecutions, and improvements noticesissued under the Manual Handling Operations Regulations over the last couple ofyears – 32 per cent of which were due to deficiency in training and 28 per centto risk assessment. To improve the situation, the HSE has made the following recommendations forsafer patient handling: – Better data on risk is needed as evidence for nursing practice – There needs to be greater focus on the patient’s needs and experience – Training needs to be more focused, with emphasis on core skills such ascommunication and body language – Much more needs to be done from an ergonomics perspective. A new word was introduced during the day: ‘haptonomics’. Haptonomy isderived from the Greek words ‘hapsis’, meaning tactile contact, sense, feeling;and ‘nomos’, meaning law, rule or norm. ‘Hapto’ means to establish arelationship through tactile contact in order to heal, to make whole, toconfirm the other’s existence. It is a science based on the observation of andexperimentation with phenomena, which can be produced or verifiedÉ whichcharacterises in a very specific way the emotional experiences of humans.(www.haptonomie.org/va/cirdh/origin.html). Subsequent searches of this topic in nursing/medical literature and internetsearch engines did not produce any more information, although the companyPatricia Bartley works for, Corpus, runs courses on the subject; seewww.arjo.com It is the six success factors that form the basis of the new RCN manualhandling training guidance (RCN 2003)2 developed from a series of focus groupsessions held with stakeholders throughout the UK. The main thrust of the guidance is the ‘Competencies for manual handling’section, which is divided into domains: – Domain 1: management of risk – Domain 2: creating a safe system of work – Domain 3: professional effectiveness and maintaining standards Each domain is subdivided again into competencies to be achieved by threegroups: – Back care advisers – Line managers/appointed manual handling supervisors/key workers – Patient/client handlers The booklet goes on to say that these competencies can be used to identifyeducational needs, underpin educational plans, curriculum and learning outcomesfor sessions and to assess competence. The conference concluded with feedback from the five workshops, whichenabled participants to discuss a variety of issues surrounding topics such asequipment, hygiene and other handling tasks in different settings. Conclusion Overall, the book, as a systematic review of patient handling research,together with the RCN guidance and the conference, provided a good basis onwhich to build and develop policies, and to update procedures and methods oftraining for a safer system of patient handling than has previously existed. Itdoes not mean however that research should stop, and all speakers at theconference agreed that more research into patient handling is needed. If your job involves giving OH support and advice to those involved withpatient or client handling, the book and guidance are for you. Greta Thornbory is a consultant in health and education References 1. HSE, 2002, Causes and kinds of occupational/work-related accident andinjury, 2001/2, www.statistics.gov.uk 2. RCN, 2003, Safer staff, better care: RCN manual handling guidance andcompetencies, publication code 001 975 3. Hignet S, Crumpton E, Ruszala S, Alexander P, Fray M, Fletcher B, 2003,Evidence-based patient handling: Tasks, equipment and interventions, London,Routledge 4. RCN, 2001, Changing practice – improving care: an integrated back injuryprevention programme for nursing and care homes, publication code 001 255 5. HSE, 2002, Handling home care, HSG 225 Research designs Source: Hignett et al, 2003 Fixed design     Flexible design Experimental strategy    Case study Previous Article Next Article 3 or more person lift Two-sling lift     Front assistedtransfer with 1 carer Leg and arm lift Flip turn on bedlast_img read more