As The Crow Flies Continues Inaugural Tour In Las Vegas [Photo]


first_imgOn Tuesday evening, As The Crow Flies rolled through Las Vegas, making a stop at the Brooklyn Bowl for a highly anticipated performance. As The Crow Flies is a relatively new project from Chris Robinson, formerly of The Black Crowes, which is in the midsts of its inaugural tour that kicked off at The Capitol Theatre on April 17th. The band also features Crowes guitarist Audley Freed and bassist Andy Hess, Chris Robinson Brotherhood drummer Tony Leone and keyboardist Adam MacDougall, as well as young famed guitarist Marcus King.Seemingly, it seems as though As The Crow Flies has been offering up fairly standardized setlists with some deviation across towns. For the band’s Las Vegas set, the group opened with a number of classic Black Crowes tunes, with the opening numbers of “Remedy” and “Sting Me” off the group’s sophomore album, 1992’s The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion, followed up by “Twice As Hard”, off The Black Crowes’ 1990 debut, Shake Your Money Maker.While the band pulled from across The Black Crowes’ expansive catalog, As The Crow Flies also found ample opportunity to lay out a few choice covers. Halfway through the performance, the group offered up a standout cover of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s “Almost Cut My Hair”, which followed a take on “Wiser Time”, off The Black Crowes’ 1994 Amorica. The band also closed out their set with a pairing of Otis Redding’s “Hard To Handle” and Joe South’s “Hush”, ahead of their one-song encore offering of Johnny Winter’s “Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo”.You can check out photos from As The Crow Flies’ Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas show on May 8th below, courtesy of Paul Citone.Setlist: As The Crow Flies | Brooklyn Bowl | Las Vegas, NV | 5/8/2018Set: Remedy, Sting Me, Twice as Hard, Nonfiction, By Your Side, Sometimes Salvation, High Head Blues, Good Friday, Almost Cut My Hair (Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young cover), Wiser Time, She Talks to Angels, Thorn in My Pride, Jealous Again, Hard to Handle (Otis Redding cover), Hush (Joe South cover)Encore: Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo (Johnny Winter cover)Photo: As The Crow Flies | Brooklyn Bowl | Las Vegas, NV | 5/8/2018 | Credit: Paul Citone Photo: Paul Citone Load remaining imageslast_img read more

College welcomes junior parents


first_imgHarvard faculty, experts, and President Drew Faust welcomed the families of third-year undergraduates to campus and gave the Class of 2012 advice on preparing for life after college during the Junior Parents Weekend (JPW) program, March 4-5. More than 560 students and nearly 1,200 of their guests attended the annual event.Faust greeted an enthusiastic crowd in Sanders Theatre on Friday afternoon for the program’s official welcome. She recalled that the first time she addressed this group of parents and students in 2008, she urged the new freshmen to explore and move beyond their comfort zones. Now, she asked parents if their children had stretched their boundaries enough to have failed at something during their three years at Harvard.“If not, they haven’t been adventurous enough,” she said. “The good news is, there’s still time.”While she acknowledged students’ anxiety about the economy and the job search that lay ahead, Faust urged them “not to leave Harvard with your heads before you leave it with your bodies.” She said that the 14 months remaining in their college careers was a long time and encouraged parents to help keep their children focused on the present, even as they consider what to do next.President Drew Faust asked parents if their children had stretched their boundaries enough to have failed at something during their three years at Harvard. “If not, they haven’t been adventurous enough,” she said. “The good news is, there’s still time.”Faust’s advice was echoed by a panel of college seniors who followed her address and shared wisdom gained during their time at Harvard. All said that experiences outside the classroom had been influential in shaping their college experience and their plans for the future. Senior Romeo Alexander shared a path that took him from Africa to New York.“I went to Ghana to study the history of slavery after my freshman year,” he said. “I visited the slave castles and learned about my own history and the history of the world. After my sophomore year, I did the Princeton in Ishikawa Program in Japan, in a home where no one spoke any English at all. Last summer I was in Tokyo with Deutsche Bank. Next year I’m going to New York. I’ve got a job helping to sell Japanese stocks.”Earlier in the day, parents piled into Science Center and listened as Harvard’s Office of Career Services (OCS) staff listed ways that third-year students could prepare for graduate school, work, and other opportunities: Take the GMAT and GRE now, while you’re in school mode; study hard, because graduate and professional programs look for a strong GPA; apply for fellowships early in the fall of senior year.Then, OCS’s undergraduate advising guru Nancy Saunders uttered three words that were music to the ears of tuition-payers. “Senior job search,” she said, savoring each syllable. “How good does that sound?”Saunders said that the process of finding a job often begins with an internship during the summer after junior year. She recommended that parents and students visit the OCS website to find out about opportunities. Saunders plugged the Crimson Careers portal, on which OCS has posted 9,679 internships and 4,000 full-time jobs since July 2010. She also urged juniors to look to the fall of their senior year and book one-on-one appointments with OCS career counselors, who see seniors almost exclusively during the first month of the semester.“Not everyone knows that they want to be a banker,” she said. “Seniors are welcome to come in and meet with a counselor, to take the Myers-Briggs personality test, to have a conversation, and to brainstorm.”OCS Director Robin Mount acknowledged the desire of parents to see their children enter the world of work, but said that Harvard undergraduates have broad interests and many different skills, which can make the decision to commit to a career path challenging. She told parents not to be concerned if their child wants to take some time off before applying to graduate school “since 75 percent of Harvard College graduates will eventually get a graduate degree.”On Saturday, parents and students considering a career in business heard from Rakesh Khurana, the Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at Harvard Business School, on the history and future of business education.Khurana noted that business education has expanded dramatically in the past 60 years. This year, for instance, U.S. business schools will award more than 120,000 master’s degrees in business administration, up from only 3,000 M.B.A.s in 1950. At the same time, business schools — originally brought to the university in the early 20th century to professionalize the occupation, standardize the knowledge of practitioners, and tie the action of firms and corporations to the common good — have increasingly become places for students to acquire a credential and to build networks that will further their careers.Khurana said that, to reconnect business education with its founding values, institutions should have an honest conversation about what students need to know and then raise the standards of the curriculum. Moreover, business education should be lifelong. Managers should come back to school frequently to refresh their knowledge.Later on Saturday, parents and undergraduates addressed the common good more directly at the public interest careers discussion, hosted by the Phillips Brooks House Association. Travis Lovett, interim director of the Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC), led the informal session. He said that Harvard undergraduates can receive funding for public service in two ways: They can come to CPIC with an idea for a public service project and apply for direct funding, or they can use CPIC as a liaison to one of the more than 600 nonprofits that have a relationship with the center.“Our postgraduate fellowship program works with nonprofits in six major cities including Boston, New York, and Chicago,” he said. “Students can see a catalog of job listings on our website. If they’re interested in one, they can apply through us. We interview them and give them feedback. Based on the interview, if we feel they’re a good fit for a particular organization, then we recommend them for the position.”While no one in the audience expected to get rich through public interest work, many were glad to hear that each organization that lists a job with CPIC must pay a living wage and offer benefits.“Most of our positions are between $30,000 and $45,000,” he said. “Commitments are typically one to two years, because many of our fellows go on to graduate school. Some are offered a continuing position, though, and stay on.”Response from parents and students to the weekend’s events was positive. Detroit’s Jeannie Wonders, parent of junior Grant Wonders, said that she appreciated the workshops and information she got during JPW. At the end of the day, though, she said that the best part of being in Cambridge was seeing her son and his friends.“It’s nice to come and see Grant in this environment,” she said. “I got to chat with his roommates. The energy of the youth on campus is invigorating. He can come home and tell us about what it’s like to be at Harvard, but it’s not the same as being here.”last_img read more

New Ph.D. program in population health sciences announced


first_imgThe Faculty of Arts and Sciences has unanimously approved a new Ph.D. program in population health sciences, which will be based at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. This final step in the formal approval process comes after four years of extensive deliberation and careful planning, which included a vote of our own faculty. The new Ph.D. will be an interdepartmental program involving the Departments of Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Global Health and Population, Nutrition, and Social and Behavioral Sciences and will be administered by a Steering Committee consisting of Subu Subramanian, the chairs from the five departments, and David Hunter as ex-officio member.The new Ph.D. program, to be launched with the entry of the first cohort in the fall of 2016, will innovate by developing a common framework of core scientific principles and knowledge that students in all five departments will learn while pursuing their doctoral degree. Simultaneously, it will build on the interdisciplinary synergies that exist across these five departments with regard to substantive areas of research. Through the common platform, the program aspires to nurture the future generation of leading scientists. As most students graduating from this program are expected to work in academic institutions, a critical aspect of the curriculum will involve the development of competencies for excellence in teaching. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Pump Boys & tick, tick to Boom at Encores!


first_imgEncores! Off-Center has announced its program for its second season of landmark off-Broadway musicals. It will feature Jonathan Larson’s tick, tick… BOOM!, headlined by Tony winners Lin-Manuel Miranda and Karen Olivo, Pump Boys and Dinnettes and the previously reported Randy Newman’s Faust.tick, tick… BOOM! has book, music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson and will play June 25 through 28. Directed by Oliver Butler, the performances will star Tony winners Lin-Manuel Miranda (In the Heights) and Karen Olivo (West Side Story). The show is an autobiographical musical by the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award–winning composer of Rent. First performed as a solo rock monologue by Larson in 1990, it is the story of an aspiring composer who questions his life choices on the eve of his thirtieth birthday. After Larson’s untimely death, it was revamped by playwright David Auburn as a three-actor piece and premiered off-Broadway on June 13, 2001 at the Jane Street Theatre, featuring Raúl Esparza as Jon. Its London production in 2005 starred Neil Patrick Harris.Pump Boys and Dinettes, with book, music and lyrics by John Foley, Mark Hardwick, Debra Monk, Cass Morgan, John Schimmel and Jim Wann, will play July 16 through 19. Directed by Lear deBessonet and choreographed by Danny Mefford, the show is a musical tribute to life on the roadside, with the actors accompanying themselves on guitar, piano, bass, fiddle, accordion and kitchen utensils. A hybrid of country, rock and pop music, Pump Boys is the story of four gas station attendants and two waitresses at a small-town dinette in North Carolina. It premiered off-Broadway at the Chelsea West Side Arts Theatre in July 1981 and opened on Broadway on February 4, 1982 at the Princess Theatre, where it played 573 performances and received a Tony nod for Best Musical. Star Files View Commentscenter_img Lin-Manuel Mirandalast_img read more

SBA implements higher maximum loan sizes


first_imgOn the heels of completing final approvals of loans to nearly 2,000 firms that has been in its loan queue waiting for final approval of the Small Business Jobs Act, the US Small Business Administration has finished implementation of another major element of the bill: increasing maximum sizes in several of its loan programs.The changes – effective today – are permanent for general small business loans under SBA’s 7(a) guaranteed loan program, fixed asset loans through the 504 Certified Development Company program, Microloans, and International Trade, Export Working Capital and Export Express loans.  A temporary increase for SBA Express loans is good for one year. “Across the country, there are small businesses owners who are in a position to take that next step to grow and create jobs, and these larger loan sizes provide another tool to help them do just that,” SBA Administrator Karen Mills said.  “Whether they’re in the start-up phase and could use a microloan or are looking to take advantage of lower real estate prices and interest rates to buy a new building to expand, SBA loans can now be an even greater resource to help entrepreneurs and small business owners get the capital they need.“Additionally, temporarily increasing the cap on SBA Express loans from $350,000 to $1 million will allow more small businesses to take advantage of the streamlined approval process for working lines of credit and other capital they need,” Mills said.Under the Jobs Act provisions, SBA has permanently increased 7(a) and 504 limits from $2 million to $5 million, and for manufacturers and certain energy-related projects seeking 504 loans, to $5.5 million.  The maximum for International Trade and Export Working Capital loans also has been increased from $2 million to $5 million. SBA also permanently increased microloan limits from $35,000 to $50,000, helping larger entrepreneurs with start-up costs and small business owners in underserved communities. It also raised the limit on Export Express loans, from $250,000 to $500,000, and made the program permanent.SBA Express loan limits have been temporarily raised from $350,000 to $1 million for one year.  These loans offer a streamlined application process with reduced paperwork and approval often in a matter of days.  Unlike traditional 7(a) loans, SBA Express loans carry a 50 percent guarantee and can be used as revolving lines of credit – to help restock inventories and support larger revenue sales – which are particularly critical for small businesses as they emerge out of the recession.SBA’s own trends show increasing demand for larger loans.  The percentage of lending volume for guaranteed loans greater than $1.5 million has grown, from 13 percent of total dollars approved in fiscal year 2005 to 21 percent in fiscal year 2010, with many loans actually at the $2 million maximum.  In the 504 program, the percentage of loan volume committed to loans greater than $1.5 million also has grown, from 15 percent of total dollars approved in fiscal year 2005 to 25 percent in fiscal year 2010.SBA has already put in place the alternate size standard that expands eligibility for SBA-backed loans that was included in the Jobs Act, increasing the alternate size standard to include those small businesses with less than $15 million in net worth and $5 million in average net income.Additionally, Administrator Mills announced on Tuesday that all loan applications placed in the SBA’s loan queue by small business borrowers had received final approval, amounting to 1,939 loans for nearly $970 million.  The loans were able to make use of loan guarantees up to 90 percent and reduced fees extended under the Jobs Act. Many of the loans had been in the queue waiting for the extension since May.The bill provided the agency with enough funding to support an estimated $14 billion in lending to small businesses with the extension of higher guarantees and reduced fees in the top two loan programs, first implemented as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.The Jobs Act also includes additional resources to help increase lending to small businesses, including the State Small Business Credit Initiative announced today by the Department of Treasury that will support $15 billion in lending through local programs and the Small Business Lending Fund, which will provide capital to local, community banks to increase their lending to small businesses.Additionally, the new law contains $12 billion in tax credits targeted to small businesses, including higher deductions for investing in new machines and equipment, zero capital gains for those who buy and hold small business stocks for five years, and a doubling of the maximum deduction for startups to $10,000.  It also allows self-employed Americans to completely deduct health insurance costs for themselves and their families.  Source: SBA. 10.8.2010last_img read more

Chile under Fire


first_imgBy Augusto Scarella Arce/Diálogo February 02, 2017 Chile has been ravaged by a series of wildfires since January 11th, with 142 disasters declared in different regions of the country’s center and south to date. Chile’s president, Michelle Bachelet, responded by issuing decrees declaring several states of emergency, which under the country’s constitution set in motion a set of measures aimed at overcoming the public disaster besetting a large swath of the country. From the beginning of this emergency, General Arturo Merino Núñez, director of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (EMCO, per its Spanish acronym), has continuously deployed units from the Emergency Operations Center to maintain precise control and coordination of the defensive measures employed to combat the wildfires. “This effort by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, with the direct consultation of the Ministry of Defense, will remain available 24 hours a day for as long as needed,” Gen. Merino said. National response More than 8,000 members of the Armed Forces are providing emergency assistance, having fought 77 wildfires to date. Of the total wildfires, covering nearly 300,000 hectares, 51 have been brought under control and 14 have been extinguished. Almost 300 vehicles, including all types of tanker and transport equipment, have been flown to the affected areas by the Chilean Air Force. Additionally, 25 planes have been brought in by the Chilean Armed Forces, which together with 18 other government organizations are working to assist members of the National Forestry Service (CONAF, per its Spanish acronym) brigades and firefighters. The national defense is also fighting fires directly through the Army Forest Fire Reinforcement Brigades, with units that provide nationwide coverage and that enjoy autonomy in deployment and logistics. Minister of Defense José Antonio Gómez made another visit to the affected areas on January 25th, accompanied by Rear Admiral Jorge Rodriguez Urria, EMCO’s chief of Operations and Joint Administration, to coordinate the military’s actions on the ground. The minister was clear and quite specific about the aid from military institutions: “They will work night and day to restore conditions that will allow rebuilding from the destruction caused by a fire of an intensity never before seen in this country.” Partner nations step in with support On January 26th, authorities met at the airport with a group of 29 Colombian brigade members who voluntarily came to help. The United States also responded very rapidly to the difficult situation Chileans are experiencing. The U.S. Agency for International Development, through its Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) donated $100 million to the non-governmental organization Caritas Chile for the local acquisition and delivery of firefighting equipment, such as power saws and weather monitoring tools requested by the Chilean National Forestry Service. “A team from the U.S. Forestry Service and USAID/OFDA is being deployed in Chile. It is made up of emergency personnel and staff with technical expertise in fighting forest fires,” said Nicole Gallagher, spokeswoman for the U.S. Embassy in Chile. On January 27th and 28th, fire brigade members from Mexico also arrived. There is a total of 609 firefighters from Argentina, Colombia, the United States, Panama, Peru, and Mexico, among other countries, fighting the flames with their Chilean counterparts. For its part, on January 29th, Brazil’s Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym) deployed two C-130 aircraft to support Chile in combatting the forest fires. Operated by the First Troop Transport Group, the aircraft arrived in Chile with 28 service members on board. “The crew follows the guidelines provided by ONEMI [Chilean Ministry of Interior’s National Office for Emergency], and the CONAF [National Forestry Corporation], who are responsible for coordinating the international aid, and it will be distributed to the place they will operate from,” explained FAB Colonel Paulo Cesar Andari, military attaché for the Brazilian Air Force in Chile, according to information from FAB. Likewise, the Peruvian Air Force transported 55 firefighters from the Civil Defense Institute and a 212 Bell helicopter aboard an L-100-20 Hercules and a C-27J Spartan aircraft from the Eighth Air Group, to help Chile fight the forest fires, according to information from defense news website Defensa.com.last_img read more

Curaçao / Aruba Forward Operating Location On The Front Line Of The Fight Against Narcotrafficking


first_imgBy Geraldine Cook November 04, 2019 The Curaçao/Aruba Forward Operating Location works with different agencies to counter transnational criminal organizations.Partner nations and the United States are on constant alert in their common battle against drug trafficking. The Curaçao/Aruba Forward Operating Location (FOL), also known as Security Cooperation Location, is a tactical location, which allows U.S. and partner nations use of the airfields at Curaçao Hato International Airport and Aruba’s Reina Beatrix International Airport to support regional efforts to disrupt security threat networks.The Curaçao/Aruba FOL is the result of a 10-year access security and defense cooperation agreement the United States and the Kingdom of the Netherlands signed in March 2000 and renewed in 2010. The Curaçao/Aruba FOL supports operations of Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF South) to detect, monitor, and track aircraft or vessels engaged in illicit drug trafficking that originate in South America and cross the Caribbean Sea to reach Mexico and the United States. The U.S. Air Force manages the Curaçao/Aruba FOL day-to-day activities providing 24/7 operational and logistics support for interagency cooperation in drug missions.“Our mission is to provide forward airbase operations in support of JIATF South’s multinational aerial counter narcotics detection, monitoring, and tracking operations in the region,” said U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel James Sinclair, Curaçao/Aruba FOL’s commander. “We do work in an environment where we trust and work together with our partners and U.S. agencies. We have a robust relationship with the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Curaçao, and Aruba’s government as well.”The Curaçao/Aruba FOL coordinates all logistics requirements to help interdiction operations upon receiving information from JIATF South Command Center, located at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Key West, Florida. Their airfield hosts P-8, P-3C, and C-130 Hercules aircraft, among others, to ensure readiness to conduct surveillance flights to detect drug cartel vessels and aircraft.“Transnational drug organizations have been pushing more of their drugs through the Pacific Ocean rather than the Caribbean, adjusting tactics, techniques, and procedures, looking for new routes,” said Lt. Col. Sinclair. “JIATF South constantly improves detection and exploitation methods to counter illicit traffU.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel James Sinclair, Curaçao/Aruba FOL’s commander (third from left) along with U.S. Air Force members and firefighters are ready 24/7 to support aerial counter drug missions. (Photo: U.S. Air Force)icking operations, working with partner nations and their capabilities in the fight against narcotrafficking organizations.”Solid partnership The Curaçao/Aruba FOL is comprised of units from Air Forces Southern’s 612th Theater Operations Group/Detachment 2 and 429th Expeditionary Operations Squadron. It also has a fire department team to support their daily activities.Counter drug operations are carried out with the participation of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Service, among other agencies, as well as the cooperation of the government of the Netherlands. As of September 2019, The Curaçao/Aruba FOL has provided logistics support to 95 counter narcotics missions and 18 non-drug related missions. They also joined missions in support of weather reconnaissance and responded to natural disasters.“We build diplomacy with our neighbors to counter the threat of drugs in the region. Having an interagency relationship builds transparency and trust not only with other agencies within the U.S. government but also builds trust with our Latin American and Caribbean countries that are part of JIATF South,” said U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Nicholas Popp, Curaçao/Aruba FOL’s director of Operations. “It shows we are working together as one team, one fight.”last_img read more

Foundation applicants needed


first_img July 1, 2005 Regular News Foundation applicants needed Foundation applicants needed The Board of Governors is seeking applicants for the following vacancy to be filled during its August 26 meeting: Florida Bar Foundation Board of Directors: Commencing immediately, one lawyer to serve remainder of a three-year term, ending June 30, 2006, on this 29-member board of directors which administers Florida’s IOTA program. Directors shall be members of the Foundation during their term(s) as directors.Persons interested in applying for this vacancy may download and complete the application online from the Bar’s Web site, floridabar.org, or may call Bar headquarters at (850) 561-5600, ext. 5757, to obtain an application form. Completed applications must be submitted to the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300 no later than close of business, Friday, August 5. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of an application.last_img read more

Credit union employee indicted


first_imgA former employee of the $65 million Allentown Federal Credit Union was indicted last month for allegedly stealing more than $640,000 from member accounts through fake fees and wire transfers.Federal prosecutors charged Julie Ann Turk, 46, of Washington Township, Pa., with bank fraud, embezzlement and money laundering.According to the indictment, Turk held several positions, including teller, Master Card coordinator, teller supervisor and general ledger coordinator, at the Pennsylvania credit union, which gave her access to AFCU’s general ledger accounts and member accounts.From January 2009 to April 2016, Turk allegedly created fraudulent credit union fees, debited the fake fees from AFCU’s general ledger account and credited the phony fees to her personal credit union account, prosecutors alleged. 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Binghamton man arrested, charged with arson


first_imgAuthorities reported a trooper noticed Hartman in the area of the fire with black soot on his forehead. Additionally, police said neighbors told troopers they saw Hartman “running” through a backyard not far from the garage fire. Police said on Aug. 9, troopers and the Nanticoke Fire Department were called to a report of a garage fire on State Route 26. State police say the investigation revealed Hartman broke into the residence to steal items and then set fire to the garage. New York State Police charged 24-year-old Alexander D. Hartman of Binghamton with arson and burglary in the 3rd degree.center_img TOWN OF NANTICOKE, N.Y. (WBNG) — Police arrested a man for starting a fire in a garage in the town of Nanticoke on Aug. 9. Hartman was transported to Broome County Central Arraignment and Processing.last_img read more