Allied’s new web


first_imgAllied Bakeries has revamped its trade website for convenience stores in an attempt to boost returns for the sector.The interactive site at www. localkingsmill.co.uk includes point-of-sale kits and a profit calculator as well as category management tips and downloadable planograms. Details of Allied’s product range for convenience stores, developed as part of the company’s £40 million relaunch, are also available to view.last_img

News story: First female chief appointed to Royal Mint in its one thousand year history


first_img I have had the privilege to work for The Royal Mint for almost 10 years and it is testament to the great colleagues and opportunities I have had, that I have been able to develop the skills that enable me to take on this role. The Royal Mint today appointed Anne Jessopp as its new chief executive and Deputy Master of the Mint. She will lead work to provide Britain with its cutting-edge secure currency and will also develop the commemorative coin and bullion arm of the business.On a visit to the Royal Mint, the Exchequer Secretary officially confirmed Anne Jessopp’s appointment – the first female to take up the role in the Royal Mint’s 1,100 year history.Speaking of her new appointment, the Deputy Master of the Mint, Anne Jessopp said: One of the most famous Masters of the Mint, before it was made a political position was Sir Isaac Newton, who had previously held the position between 1700-27. It may have taken over 1,000 years but the Mint is now finally led by a woman, and I am certain Anne will do a great job. Anne Jessopp brings a wealth of expertise to this role. With her decade of experience at the Royal Mint, I am confident she will ensure the UK continues to have the most secure currency in the world, and our coins are loved and collected the world over.center_img The Exchequer to the Secretary to the Treasury, Robert Jenrick welcomed the appointment and said: What does the Deputy Master of the Mint do?As chief executive of the Royal Mint, Anne will be tasked with running the Great British institution which produces up to 90 million coins every week. At the top of her in-tray will be overseeing the introduction of the new 50 pence coin, announced last week, to mark the centenary celebrations of women’s suffrage.Her official position as Deputy Master of the Mint is one that is steeped in history. Her first ceremonial role will be to lead the annual Trial of the Pyx.First held in 1282, the Trial of the Pyx tests the integrity of the nation’s coins, ensuring that they are the proper weight and size, and contain the right amount of precious metals. Every February, coins of each denomination struck by the Royal Mint are selected at random and locked away in the Pyx chests.In a ceremony, which has not changed since before Henry VIII’s reign, the Deputy Master of the Mint brings these chests to London’s Goldsmiths’ Hall, where the coins are checked by an independent jury. The Jury consists of leaders from the financial world and six assayers from the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths who, wearing traditional red robes, put the coins to the test.After two months of rigorous testing, the trial reconvenes and the Queen’s Remembrancer asks the Jury for its verdict. In May, this verdict will be given in the presence of the Deputy Master of The Royal Mint and the Chancellor of the Exchequer (or a representative).Remarkably, the history books reveal that if the coins fail the test, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who is the ceremonial Master of the Mint, risks losing a hand as punishment.It should be made clear that in the trial’s long history, 94 Minters have had their right hands cut off by order of the King. However, this has not happened for hundreds of years.Notes to editors: I am delighted to be appointed to lead this unique and important British organisation. The Royal Mint has an impressive history of over 1,100 years and its longevity is due to its ability to adapt as society changes. This was never truer than today, as we reinterpret The Royal Mint for the 21st century, building on the values that have been at the heart of the organisation throughout our history – authenticity, security, precious metals, craftsmanship and design.last_img read more

The Kandy Bar takes Scotch Pie Champion title


first_imgSaltcoats bakery The Kandy Bar has taken the title of World Scotch Pie Champion 2014.The firm also took home a silver award for its large apple tart, and bronze awards for its sausage roll, meat, bean & potato pie and macaroni pie.The 15th annual championships saw a record number of entries, with 100 butchers and bakers submitting a total of 525 entries across the pies, pasties, sausage rolls, bridies, savouries and apple pie categories.The winners were announced at a special awards luncheon in Dunfermline yesterday (15 January).Stephen McAllister, from The Kandy Bar, said: “I am delighted. To have been given the ultimate accolade and to be able to call our pie the World Champion, as judged by a panel of experts, is just fantastic.“I am really looking forward to the year ahead and to selling more of our winning pies than ever.”last_img read more

Tix Now On Sale for Return of Annie Baker’s Pulitzer Prize Winner The Flick


first_img The Flick View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 10, 2016 Tickets are now available for the off-Broadway return of Annie Baker’s 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, The Flick. Directed once again by Sam Gold, the production will play a limited engagement May 5 through August 30. Opening night is scheduled for May 28 at the Barrow Street Theatre.Set in a rundown movie theater in central Massachusetts, The Flick tells the story of three underpaid employees who mop the floors and attend to one of the last 35 millimeter film projectors in the state. Their battles and heartbreaks, more gripping than the lackluster second-run movies on screen, play out in the empty theater aisles.Alex Hanna, Louisa Krause, Matthew Maher and Aaron Clifton Moten will reprise their performances in the production. The play previously ran at Playwrights Horizons in 2013.last_img read more

Vermont patients benefit from federal EHR incentive program


first_imgVITL Middlebury, Vt. (August 12) – Vermont patients are beginning to see results from a $27 billion federal program that offers incentives for physician practices and hospitals to use electronic health records systems, according to US Senator Patrick Leahy. Those benefits include Vermonters receiving more reminders about important preventive care. Senator Leahy spoke during a visit to Middlebury Family Health Friday, the first Vermont physician practice to meet all of the federal program’s criteria for improving patient care using its electronic health records system.”I am delighted that this targeted federal investment has enabled Middlebury Family Health to become the first Vermont practice to receive incentive payments from Medicare for using an electronic health record system,” Leahy said. “Better records mean better patient care and patient safety for Vermonters.  With breakthroughs like this, we are beginning to shift to a higher gear in health reform. The federal partnership with Vermont Information Technology Leaders and local physician practices has the potential to benefit every Vermonter.   Vermont has been in the front ranks of health care reform, and Middlebury Family Health’s adoption of an electronic health record system is an excellent example of this leadership.” As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Congress appropriated $27 billion to fund the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs. To participate in either of the programs, eligible health care professionals must use federally-certified EHR technology, and meet a number of criteria for becoming “meaningful users” of EHRs and improving patient care. Once documenting that they have achieved meaningful use, eligible professionals receive up to a total of $44,000 in incentive payments from Medicare over the five years they choose to participate in the program or up to $63,750 in incentive payments from Medicaid over the six years they choose to participate in the program.  Hospitals may also participate in the programs, receiving incentives based on a number of factors, beginning with a $2 million base payment.All four physicians at Middlebury Family Health recently achieved meaningful use of their EHR, and each has received the maximum first year incentive payment of $18,000 from Medicare, making them the first eligible professionals in Vermont to do so. The physician practice will use the federal funds to pay for the EHR technology and to continue to make investments in improving patient care.  “Our electronic health records system has streamlined communication in the office between physicians, nurses, and other staff,” said Eileen Doherty Fuller, MD, a partner at Middlebury Family Health. “We’ve also greatly enhanced communications with our patients. Using the EHR, we can better track which patients are overdue for physicals, mammograms, and checkups for high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol.” When the electronic health records system flags an overdue preventive service, Middlebury Family Health contacts the patient to schedule an appointment. “Often patients don’t realize it is time for them to come in, so we are able to be more proactive about reminders,” Dr. Fuller said.Other general criteria for meaningful use that directly affect patient care include: eprescribing and the ability to immediately check drug-to-drug and drug allergy interactions; maintaining up-to-date patient medical problem lists and medication lists; and providing patients with a clinical summary of their visit, including any changes to medications, instructions and other relevant information.  One feature of Middlebury Family Health’s electronic health record system that has been particularly beneficial is its ability to track whether ordered lab tests were actually completed, Dr. Fuller said. If a patient fails to show up for a scheduled test, the EHR will alert physicians who can follow up with the patient.Middlebury Family Health has also met the standards for being a patient centered medical home, and attained the highest level status in that National Committee for Quality Assurance program, Dr. Fuller noted. As a result, Middlebury Family Health will receive the highest level of payment for participating in the Vermont Blueprint for Health program. “Without the EHR, we could have never done that,” she said.”Middlebury Family Health worked with VITL and the state of Vermont using collaborative workgroups for meaningful use and the medical home. We included four staff members and two doctors to learn and implement this system. Joining me on this team were Dr. Linn Larson, Medent Specialist Michelle Clark, and Office Manager Stacy Ladd. They kept the staff involved and excited throughout the process. In addition, Christine Fuller and Connie Billings were an important resource to the team. The efforts of all our employees and this core team were critical to our success,” Dr. Fuller said. The other two physicians in the practice areJean Andersson-Swayze, MD, and Dayle Klitzner, MD. Assistance from VITLPhysician practices and hospitals around the country receive assistance in implementing EHR technology and achieving meaningful use from 62 non-profit regional extension centers funded by the federal government. Vermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL), an independent non-profit organization based in Montpelier, is the only such center serving Vermont.VITL’s staff worked with Middlebury Family Health to implement its EHR system and connect it to the Vermont Health Information Exchange, a secure statewide health data network operated by VITL. Middlebury Family Health’s four physicians received information and guidance from VITL on achieving meaningful use and qualifying for federal incentive payments.”VITL congratulates Middlebury Family Health for being the first Vermont practice to achieve meaningful use. While you are in the vanguard, there are many other practices following in your footsteps,” said David Cochran, MD, VITL’s president and CEO. “We’re working with more than 750 of the state’s 1,000 primary care providers and expect that Vermont will have one of the highest percentages of health care providers in the country achieving meaningful use. That’s great news for Vermont patients and the state’s health care reform efforts,” he said.The transition to advanced electronic health records systems is also happening in the state’s 14 hospitals, Dr. Cochran noted. Copley Hospital in Morrisville announced on June 29 that it was the first hospital in Vermont to achieve meaningful use. VITL is working with Copley and the rest of Vermont’s hospitals on meaningful use and health information exchange.VITL assisted Porter Medical Center with implementation of the hospital’s new EHR system, which went live on August 1, as well as the installation of a lab system interface to the Vermont Health Information Exchange so that Middlebury Family Health and other physician practices in the hospital’s service area can receive lab results immediately in electronic format.”Through the efforts of Porter Medical Center and area physician practices, including Middlebury Family Health, Addison County is well on the way to becoming one of the most connected communities in Vermont for medical records,” Dr. Cochran said. “Patients in the Middlebury area will experience better health care because of the increased use of health information technology, everything from smoother check-in at the front desk to greater information sharing among authorized providers, which will result in fewer duplicated tests and quicker diagnoses of medical problems.” last_img read more

Inspired to Shine: TD Charitable Foundation awards theater-based education grant to Brattleboro Retreat


first_imgTD Bank,The TD Charitable Foundation has awarded a grant for academic programming to the Brattleboro Retreat, the nonprofit psychiatric hospital announced this week. The $13,500 grant will underwrite the Inspired to Shine program, a theater-based academic program for children and youth enrolled in the Meadows EducationalCenter, a K-12 Vermont approved school located on the Brattleboro Retreat campus.‘We are honored to receive support from TD Bank, through the TD Charitable Foundation, for this innovative program,’ said Brattleboro Retreat’s President and CEO, Robert Simpson. ‘Inspired to Shine combines substantive academic material with the exceptional clinical care that is the trademark of the Brattleboro Retreat.’Piloted in the summer of 2011, Inspired to Shine ties a theater-based project in with core classroom subjects in order to help participating students improve educational outcomes, develop self-esteem, and build interpersonal skills. Students from the Retreat’s alternative therapeutic day school program, the Brattleboro Retreat Individually Developed & Guided Education Services (BRIDGES), as well as Meadows School residential patients participatetogether in the program.In the pilot session, students read several different Shakespeare works and ‘ under the direction of a theater teacher ‘ created a dramatic performance using a ‘newscast’ format to highlight various Shakespeare plots. The themes were embedded into all of the students’ core subjects: students read Shakespeare scripts forEnglish, studied the time period for history, used ancient architecture for math, and created set designs for art.‘The successful pilot session of Inspired to Shine was a rewarding and memorable experience for our students, our school staff, and the Retreat employees who served as our audience,’ said BRIDGES Coordinator Jessica Shepley. ‘We have found that success in reaching our students, many of whom have struggled in school–and helping them absorb academic material–lies in moving away from the traditional classroom setting and engaging them in hands-on, activity-based programming. Inspired to Shine exemplifies this approach,’ continued Shepley. ‘We are so grateful for TD Bank’s support and we are looking forward to continuing the program in 2012.’The Brattleboro Retreat, founded in 1834, is a not-for-profit, regional specialty psychiatric hospital and addictions treatment center, providing a full range of diagnostic, therapeutic and rehabilitation services for individuals of all ages and their families. Recognized as a national leader in the treatment mental illness and addiction, the Brattleboro Retreat offers a high quality, individualized, comprehensive continuum of care including inpatient, partial hospitalization, residential and outpatient treatment.The TD Charitable Foundation is the charitable giving arm of TD Bank N.A., which operates as TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®, and is one of the 10 largest commercial banking organizations in the United States. The Foundation’s mission is to serve the individuals, families and businesses in all the communities where TD Bank operates, having made $83.5 million in charitable donations since its inception in 2002. The Foundation’s areas of focus are affordable housing, financial literacy and education, and the environment. More information on the TD Charitable Foundation, including an online grant application, is available at www.TDBank.com(link is external).TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is one of the 10 largest banks in the U.S., providing more than 7.8 million customers with a full range of retail, small business and commercial banking products and services at more than 1,280 convenient locations throughout the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Metro D.C., the Carolinas and Florida. In addition, TD Bank and its subsidiaries offer customized wealth management services through TD Wealth, and insurance products and services through TD Insurance, Inc. TD Bank is headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J., and Portland, Maine.BRATTLEBORO, VT (January 12, 2012)last_img read more

Trail Mix: Jonathon Linaberry, aka The Bones of J.R. Jones, Releases ‘Dark Was The Yearling’


first_imgThere are days when I think it would be cool to step outside myself, to take a few minutes or hours and just become someone else.  New York musician Jonathon Linaberry feels the same way.  In fact, he has gone so far as to create a fictitious persona, J.R. Jones, through which he channels the spirits of early Americana roots players to create beautifully dark, moody and bluesy folk music.Linaberry, under the moniker The Bones of J.R. Jones, has just released, Dark Was The Yearling, his first full length record.  It is outstanding.  Drawing from a wellspring that includes blues luminaries like R.L. Burnside, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and Blind Lemon Jefferson, and old time favorites like The Carter Family, Dark Was The Yearling represents a sonic collision between the age old worlds of roots music.  Banjo driven tunes like “St. James Bed” rest side by side with acoustic gems like “The Plan” and the electrified grit of “Fury of the Light.”  This collection, like the spirit of J.R. Jones, feels old, like it was pulled, after being long forgotten or ignored, from a dusty shelf instead of cut in the digital age.  For those less interested in digital slickness, it’s a sound that definitely works.Dark Was The Yearling marks The Bones of J.R. Jones as a new voice resonating with the heaviest timbre of old time Americana.I recently caught up with Jonathon Linaberry to chat about old heroes, playing in a one man band, and whether J.R. Jones prefers beer or whiskey.BRO –  Tell me more about J.R. Jones.  Would I like to sit down and have a beer with him?  Maybe a whiskey?JL – Depends on if you are buying or not.  Honestly, he’s not picky.  If it’s wet, he will probably drink it.  He could chat mostly about anything, but I think if you really want to get to know him, I don’t think talking about his music is a good approach.  At least at first.  He tends to be a little tight lipped about all of that.BRO – The best part about being in a one man band?JL – I suppose it is the fact that I know exactly what to expect.  I can rely solely on myself, which makes things less complicated.  Generally, less complicated means less stress, which makes this whole thing a little more enjoyable.  It can be easy to travel, too, which works well for me.  All I need is a sleeping bag, guitar, and my kit.BRO – The worst part about being in a one man band?JL – I could say the worst part about all of this is the same as the best part.  It depends on my mood.  Flying solo, for all its freedom, can be overwhelming.  Mostly because when things go bad, there is only one person to blame.BRO – We are running “Good Friend of Mine” on Trail Mix this month.  What is the story behind the song?JL – That song went through a lot of transitions.  It took me a while to figure out what it was about.  I think I decided it’s about being so hopefully gone for a girl that, in a way, she is killing you.  It’s so bad that even the voice of the devil in you is the voice of reason.  I hope that makes sense.BRO – You draw inspiration from some of the early Americana and blues greats.  If you could jam or hang out with one of your long gone musical heroes, who would it be?  What might you talk about?JL – Oh, man.  There are so many.  If I had to choose, maybe Skip James of Son House.  To be honest, I don’t think I would have much to say to them.  I’d just want to hear them.  What I love about them is the pain and passion they put into their songs.  And to be able to hear that live . . . . I think it would be soul quaking.You can catch Jonathon Linaberry, as The Bones of J.R. Jones, on Friday, June 27th, at Pete’s Candy Store in Brooklyn, New York.  His calendar shows more  upcoming dates in New York and Maryland.  Stay tuned to www.the-wildness.com for more show dates and information on how you can grab a copy of Dark Was The Yearling, the brand new record.Speaking of that new record, Trail Mix would like to give you a shot at getting a signed copy for free.  Here’s what you need to do.  Shoot an email to [email protected] and answer the last question from up above – If you could jam or hang out with one of your long gone musical heroes, who would it be? We’ll pick a cool entry from all of the responses we receive by noon tomorrow (Thursday, June 26th) and get that lucky winner a copy of the record.BonesJRJones_003Good luck!last_img read more

Consumers rule in the Now Economy


first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » In a world where Amazon rules and a new fintech is popping up every day to take a bite out of credit unions’ business, we must adapt to satisfy member needs instantly and at scale.Digital growth has morphed how consumers order, receive, and pay for goods and services, developing the Now Economy. The ability to order virtually anything, anywhere, at any time has placed immediacy as a priority for most businesses. Take a look at fast couture fashion: Major fashion houses blanket social media during their shows and make their collections available online for immediate purchase.Consumers’ rising delivery expectations in the Now Economy will accelerate emerging technologies, such as robots and drones. Drones make instant gratification a nearer reality by delivering more products faster, even to remote locations. For merchants, drones promise to increase efficiency and reduce costs.last_img read more

Comments on CFPB remittance rule changes due Jan. 21


first_imgCUNA is encouraging credit unions to submit their comments on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) proposal to raise the safe harbor thresholds for its remittance rule by the Jan. 21 deadline. Stakeholders can use CUNA’s Grassroots Action Center to submit comments to the CFPB.The CFPB finalized its remittance rule in February 2012, and after a mandatory rule assessment last year, is proposing to increase the “normal course of business” safe harbor threshold from 100 to 500 transfers annually.In addition, the CFPB is also proposing changes to the rule to mitigate the effects of the expiration of the statutory “fee estimates exception” that allows insured institutions to disclose estimates instead of exact amounts to consumers. That exception expires on July 21.CUNA generally supports the CFPB’s proposal, but has called for the threshold to be raised to at least 1,000 and for the CFPB to explore several revisions and additions to the proposed rule. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Canada reports progress in avian flu battle


first_imgMay 13, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Canadian authorities reported progress yesterday in their battle to stamp out avian influenza in British Columbia, while news services reported possible signs of a new strain of avian flu virus in the outbreak area.Canadian officials announced plans on Apr 5 to sacrifice about 19 million poultry in the Fraser River Valley near Vancouver to control an outbreak of highly pathogenic H7N3 avian flu. The disease has been detected in 40 commercial poultry farms and 10 backyard flocks.Yesterday the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said the campaign to destroy all poultry within 3 kilometers of infected farms was nearing completion. A total of 296 backyard flocks had been destroyed, the agency said.More than 500 sites have tested negative for avian flu, and no new infected farms have been found since Apr 29, the CFIA said. The agency said workers have begun cleaning and disinfecting 21 of the 40 infected farms.Also yesterday, British Columbia officials they had found what may be a new strain of avian flu on a duck and goose farm at Abbotsford, B.C., in the outbreak area, according to an Associated Press (AP) report.Dr. Perry Kendall, British Columbia medical health officer, said blood tests of geese and ducks revealed what looked like antibodies to an H5 avian flu virus, but the findings were not confirmed, according to the story. Confirmatory test results were expected tomorrow. The birds were not sick, the report said.The recent widespread avian flu outbreaks in East Asia, which led to 24 fatal human cases and the sacrifice of millions of birds, involved an H5N1 virus. But Kendall said the absence of illness in the Canadian birds suggests the strain involved is not the same as in the Asian outbreaks.The AP report said the finding of a possible new virus prompted officials to close a school across the road from the duck and goose farm. No children or staff members at the school had any signs of illness, said Sally Greenwood of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC). She said the school would be closed until the end of the week and that plans called for destroying all the birds on the farm by then, according to the report.The report quoted Rick Thiessen, president of the British Columbia Chicken Growers Association, as saying that 75% of the poultry in the outbreak area had been destroyed.In other developments, a consortium of British Columbia medical agencies reported last week that they had sequenced the genome of the H7N3 virus involved in the outbreak.”The genome sequencing demonstrated that this is entirely a bird isolate, and contains no human influenza A genes at this time,” stated an announcement from the British Columbia Cancer Agency’s Genome Sciences Center, the BCCDC, and the Animal Health Center of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries.The project revealed a previously unknown mutation in the virus that could explain its increased virulence, the statement said.last_img read more